Results tagged ‘ Phillies ’

Garrett Richards’ second inning: Immaculate …

nolanNolan Ryan and Garrett Richards.

That’s it.

Those are the only two guys in Angels history to record an immaculate inning, which consists of nine pitches and three strikeouts. Ryan did it on June 9, 1972, in the second inning against the Red Sox. Richards did it on Wednesday, in the second inning of a 4-0 win over the Astros.

“That was my guy growing up,” Richards said after eight shutout innings. “It’s cool. It’s cool to be put in a group with a guy like that. I didn’t even realize it until after the game. It was fun. It was a fun game to be a part of.”

Yes, Richards is way too young to grow up idolizing Ryan. He’s 26, which means he was 5 years old during the Hall of Famer’s final season with the Rangers in 1993. But his father was a big fan of Ryan, and that made Richards, raised in Southern California, a fan, too.

“I met him one time in Texas,” Richards said. “It was awesome.”

Here’s how the bottom of the second went (video here) …

Jon Singleton: 96-mph fastball (foul), 88-mph slider (swinging), 79-mph curveball (swinging).
Matt Dominguez: 95-mph cutter (looking), 97-mph fastball (swinging), 97-mph cutter (looking).
Chris Carter: 97-mph cutter (swinging), 79-mph curveball (swinging), 88-mph slider (swinging).

Three others have thrown an immaculate inning this season (Justin Masterson of the Indians on June 2, Cole Hamels of the Phillies on May 17 and Brad Boxberger of the Rays on May 8), and Richards’ is the 55th in Major League history. Thirty-three have come in the National League, twenty-two have come in the American League. Ryan also accomplished it with the Mets in 1968, and Lefty Grove did it twice in one season (1928, with the A’s). Nobody has ever done it more than once in the same game (here’s the full list).

“That’s just the type of stuff you rarely ever see,” catcher Hank Conger said. “But with a guy like Garrett, that’s the type of things that can happen, especially with his type of stuff.”

Alden

Who’s got the ninth? It’s anybody’s guess …

Joe Smith, Hank CongerOn Friday and Tuesday, Joe Smith pitched the eighth inning and Ernesto Frieri handled the ninth because the better part of the lineup — 2-3-4 on Friday, 1-2-3 on Tuesday — was batting in the eighth. But on Wednesday afternoon, Mike Scioscia threw a monkey wrench into any theory that Smith would be pitching against the better part of any lineup, when he had Frieri face the top of the order in the eighth and saved Smith for what ended up being 4-5-6 — and could’ve easily been 7-8-9 — in the ninth.

Why, exactly?

The score — 4-3 on Tuesday, 3-0 on Wednesday — surely played a factor.

“With the game one run yesterday, we liked Joe’s sinker against the bigger guys,” Scioscia explained. “Also, give guys a different look. We had the leeway if Ernie made one mistake it wasn’t going to hurt you as it might have last night.”

This much is clear by this point: There’s no hard-and-fast rule for who will be used in a save situation on a given day, be it Smith or Frieri. It’ll depend on matchups, sure, and it seems like Scioscia still trusts Smith more than Frieri. But the score will play a factor, as will giving the same hitters different looks and, certainly, the state of each reliever.

Scioscia would eventually like to have one closer, and he’d ideally like it to be Frieri so that he can maximize Smith’s versatility, but this is officially a closer-by-committee situation.

“To me, it relates to my early days with Cleveland, when I pitched the fifth, sixth, seventh and never knew when I was gonna pitch,” Smith said. “I was ready to pitch the eighth [on Tuesday]. I thought the phone call was going to be for me.”

“I just want to pitch,” Frieri said. “Especially in a close game.”

Alden

Mike Trout: ‘It’s always good to come back home’ …

Mike TroutMike Trout landed in Philadelphia at about 2 a.m. late Sunday night, then made the 45-minute drive south to his parents’ house in the outskirts of his hometown of Millville, N.J. He slept in — missing out on an invitation to watch the Philadelphia Eagles practice — caught up with his niece, nephew, brother and sister, then went to Citizens Bank Park, where upwards of 8,000 people from his hometown made a visit to root him on. Below is a partial transcript of what he had to say about it.

On coming back to Philly …

It means a lot to have fans and people that follow me and the team. Growing up as a Phillies fan and Eagles fan and all those Phillies teams, it’s going to be pretty cool to see the reaction. I know when I was growing up as a kid, going to the Eagles games, if I saw someone with a different jersey on, they were getting booed. So it’s going to be interesting. I love it here. People are great. It’s where I was brought up, so it’s always good to be back.

 On how life has changed since he left …

It’s going to be a little different, running on the field tonight as opposed to a high school game. Just to look back and be here, and all the memories coming up – and the high school team is going to be on the field for BP, so that’s pretty cool. Life’s definitely changed a lot. It’s gone quick, though. I’ve been having fun. And I’ve been blessed, with great parents and great people that brought me up. I’m just happy to be here and having fun, playing the game I love.

On the interest level …

I love the support. I go back into town and in the offseason, I go into the stores and people are coming up to me, congratulating me, wanting to take a picture. It means a lot, coming from a small town, people and scouts doubted me, doubted the East coast. We’ve got some talent on the East coast, some good kids out there. Just hard work, dedication, a lot of sacrifices. Just to have the support behind you, telling you that 8,000 people are coming from Millville. There’s a lot of fans coming. It means a lot, and I’m very excited about tonight.

 On Chase Utley …

It’s always fun to play against guys you watched growing up. It’s going to be special, just to be here, to play, actually play in the games instead of just sit in the stands and watch them. I got to watch a couple games at the Vet, and I got to showcase here before the Draft. That was pretty cool. Now to be up here playing, it’s going to be fun.

 On making it out of Millville …

Just for younger kids, playing the game, or getting good grades in school, just knwing that they have a chance, and just hard work and dedication. If you put your mind to something, it’s possible. Millville – I didn’t think they were struggling, but there’s obviously struggles there. Coming from Millville, small town, East coast, it means a lot to me, my family, my friends, it’s definitely something special.

On his first at-bat at CBP …

It’s going to be something special. To think a couple years ago that I would be playing here — not watching, but actually playing — is a special feeling. There’s going to be some boos, there’s going to be some cheers. It’s baseball. It should be like that. I’m just going to go out there and play my game.

On what he wants to tell the people of Millville …

I want to thank them for coming. Their support means a lot. It’s very special for them to come out, take the time to see me play. I wish it was a four-game series, but it’ll be a good two days.

Alden

Division-by-division: NL East …

Bryce Harper

Leading up to Spring Training, I’ll take a look at each of the six divisions in hopes of providing an overview for what to expect this coming season. First up, the NL East.

Braves
Last year’s record: 96-66, 1st place (lost to Dodgers in NLDS)
Key additions: UT Ryan Doumit, RP Luis Vasquez, SP Gavin Floyd, 1B Mat Gamel
Key subtractions: C Brian McCann, SP Tim Hudson, SP Paul Maholm, RP Scott Downs
Biggest strength: The ninth inning, where Craig Kimbrel has cemented himself as the best closer in baseball by posting a 1.48 ERA and converting 138 of 153 save chances the last three years.
Biggest question: Filling the gaps. The Braves overcame a lot in 2013 (struggles by B.J. Upton and Dan Uggla, injuries to Tim Hudson and Jason Heyward), but lost a few important pieces over the offseason and will need a lot more to go right.
Most important player: B.J. Upton. He batted a ghastly .184/.268/.289 in the first of a five-year, $75.25 million contract and needs to step up for an offense that is now without McCann (and still with Uggla).
In 25 words or less: The Braves handily won the division despite dealing with a lot of adversity last year, but the Nats are better and their holes are bigger.

Marlins
Last year’s record: 62-100, 5th place
Key additions: 1B Garrett Jones, 2B Rafael Furcal, C Jarrod Saltalamacchia, 3B Casey McGehee, RP Carter Capps
Key subtractions: 1B Logan Morrison, 3B Placido Polanco, OF Justin Ruggiano, OF Chris Coghlan, RP Chad Qualls
Biggest strength: Pitching, particularly young pitching. Despite losing triple-digit games, the Marlins had the best ERA in franchise history (3.71) and did it with an assortment of pre-arbitration pitchers with upside — Jacob Turner, Nathan Eovaldi, Henderson Alvarez, Steve Cishek and, of course, NL Rookie of the Year Jose Fernandez.
Biggest question: Offense. The Marlins ranked last in the Majors in runs scored last year. They’ve since added several new bats, but Furcal (coming off Tommy John surgery), McGehee (spent 2013 in Japan), Saltalamacchia (back issues) and Jones (.578 career OPS against lefties) all have questions.
Most important player: Giancarlo Stanton. He was limited to 116 games and an .845 OPS because of a strained right hamstring in 2013 and needs to produce in 2014 — either to help the Marlins’ needy offense, or to maximize a trade.
In 25 words or less: They’re an ownership and financial mess, but somehow the Marlins have done what they’ve always done — accrue young, talented pitching.

Mets
Last year’s record: 74-88, 3rd place
Key additions: OF Chris Young, OF Curtis Granderson, SP Bartolo Colon, SP John Lannan
Key subtractions: SP Johan Santana, SP Shaun Marcum, RP LaTroy Hawkins
Biggest strength: Starting pitching, even without Matt Harvey and in the post-Santana era. With Colon, Zack Wheeler, Dillon Gee and Jon Niese, and top prospect Noah Syndergaard likely joining them midseason, it’s their best chance to compete, now and in the future.
Biggest question: Relief pitching. They ranked 22nd in bullpen ERA last year, and they don’t know what they’ll get out of closer Bobby Parnell (2.16 ERA and 22 saves) coming off neck surgery.
Most important player: Harvey, even though he won’t even pitch this year. The 24-year-old right-hander underwent Tommy John surgery 26 starts into a brilliant sophomore season that saw him finish fourth in Cy Young voting and will spend the entire year rehabbing. If he returns to form in 2015, he’ll join a young and dynamic rotation, and then the Mets can really get going.
In 25 words or less: It’s nice to see the Mets finally spend on free agents, but there are still too many holes to compete in a tough division.

Nationals
Last year’s record: 86-76, 2nd place
Key additions: MGR Matt Williams, SP Doug Fister, RP Jerry Blevins, OF Nate McLouth, INF Jamey Carroll
Key subtractions: MGR Davey Johnson, SP Dan Haren, INF Steve Lombardozzi, RP Ian Krol, 1B/3B Chad Tracy
Biggest strength: Talent across the board. With Fister joining Stephen Strasburg, Gio Gonzalez and Jordan Zimmermann, their rotation is spectacular. With Bryce Harper, Jayson Werth, Ian Desmond, Ryan Zimmerman, etc., their offense is dangerous from top to bottom. With Rafael Soriano, Craig Stammen, Drew Storen and Tyler Clippard, their bullpen is solid in the back end.
Biggest question: A rookie manager, and whether or not he can put it together for a veteran team that has World Series aspirations and underachieved last season.
Most important player: Blevins, or Xavier Cedeno, or any other lefty reliever who can consistently get lefty hitters out in a division loaded with dangerous lefty bats. It’s the Nats’ biggest (and, perhaps, only) weakness.
In 25 words or less: Barring injury, there’s no reason why this shouldn’t be a playoff team. Plain and simple.

Phillies
Last year’s record: 73-89, 4th place
Key additions: OF Marlon Byrd, C Wil Nieves, SP/RP Roberto Hernandez, RP Brad Lincoln, RP Chad Gaudin
Key subtractions: SP Roy Halladay, SP John Lannan
Biggest strength: The top of the rotation. Not many teams can boast a 1-2 punch as lethal as Cliff Lee and Cole Hamels.
Biggest question: The health and production of the assortment of high-priced, aging superstars — namely, Ryan Howard, Chase Utley, Jimmy Rollins and Jonathan Papelbon.
Most important player: Howard. He’s owed a guaranteed $75 million over the next three years and needs to revert back to the MVP form he’s now three years removed from.
In 25 words or less: Ruben Amaro Jr. is trying to squeeze out all that’s left from this championship fruit, but it may have already dried up.

Predicted order of finish …

  • Nationals
  • Braves
  • Marlins
  • Phillies
  • Mets

Alden

Some names to consider …

Jerry Dipoto and Mike Scioscia are both coming back, and now they have a coaching staff to round out. Bench coach Rob Picciolo and hitting coach Jim Eppard were let go, Dino Ebel was promoted to bench coach and three spots are now open: third-base coach, hitting coach and a third, unidentified spot (perhaps an assistant hitting coach).

With that in mind, below is a list of potential candidates. Keep in mind that this is not an exhaustive list; there are several others who will be interviewed for the open spots. Some is based on indications I’ve received, some are just my own speculation. Here goes …

Wally Joyner: He’ll definitely draw some strong interest as hitting coach. He just declined to return as the Phillies’ assistant hitting coach and was well-regarded in that clubhouse. And, you know, there’s that whole “Wally World” thing. Scioscia had him on his team in 2001.

Tim Bogar: He was the Red Sox’s third-base coach from 2010 to 2012, before taking a job as manager of the Angels’ Double-A affiliate in Arkansas, and is considered a future managerial candidate throughout the industry.

Troy Percival: Scioscia is a big fan of the former Angels closer. The Angels hired him in 2007 to be a special assignment pitching instructor, but he walked away soon after to make a comeback in the Majors. He’s currently the baseball coach at his alma mater, Moreno Valley High School.

Brett Butler: The former Dodgers center fielder has been managing the D-backs’ Triple-A affiliate since 2008 and had a good relationship with Dipoto dating back to the GM’s time in Arizona.

Leon Durham: He’s spent the last 12 years as hitting coach for Triple-A Toledo, in the Tigers’ organization, and has been drawing interest for the same role in the Majors over the last couple of years.

Eddie Rodriguez: He was just dismissed by the Royals, who brought ex-Cubs skipper Dale Sveum to Ned Yost‘s coaching staff, and was considered a good third-base coach in Kansas City.

Daren Brown: The Mariners will presumably be cleaning house with their coaching staff after manager Eric Wedge left. Brown finished the year as the third-base coach — promoted from Triple-A, where he was manager, after Jeff Datz was diagnosed with cancer midseason — and is considered a good baseball man. Brown was interim manager in Seattle for 50 games towards the end of 2010.

Dave Anderson: He was just dismissed as the Rangers’ first-base coach, and he has a history with assistant GM Scott Servais (from their time together in Texas) and Scioscia (they were teammates on the Dodgers).

Omar Vizquel: The current Angels roving infield instructor figures to be a hot managerial candidate very soon and is very well thought of throughout the organization. He’s never had experience as a third-base coach, he likely won’t fit as a hitting coach, and Alfredo Griffin already handles the infielder. But perhaps he can be looked at for the final coaching spot. He’d definitely bring a lot of energy.

Alden

The Angels got someone for free on Sunday …

CISCOAnd guess what — he’s actually pretty good.

Right-handed reliever Mike Cisco (pictured left) was acquired from the Phillies for “no compensation” on Sunday, even though he posted a 1.80 ERA in 40 appearances in Double-A and Triple-A last year and is said to be healthy.

Why, exactly?

Well, the Phillies had an excess of pitching in Double-A and Triple-A (talk about a problem). The Angels like him, have a spot for him — in the Double-A ‘pen, most likely — and the Phils wanted to make sure he’d go somewhere he’d have an opportunity to pitch. So he was gift-wrapped to the Angels.

Cisco, who will work out of Minor League camp the rest of spring, “should help upgrade our inventory,” Angels general manager Jerry Dipoto said.

“He’s versatile, can start or relieve and throws strikes with three pitches,” Dipoto added via text message. Cisco doesn’t have big stuff and is only listed at 5-foot-11 — meaning he’s probably about 5-8 or 5-9 — but he has solid deception, has performed at basically every level and, according to Dipoto, has good makeup.

And, hey, he’s basically free!

Alden

Angels in search of a backup catcher …

The Angels, feeling a little uneasy about Hank Conger‘s throwing woes, are in search of a veteran backup catcher as Spring Training winds down, an industry source confirmed to MLB.com on Saturday. Danny Knobler of CBSSports.com first reported the Angels’ interest.

Conger, 25, came into camp as the clear-cut favorite to back up catcher Chris Iannetta and has hit well, batting .381 with two homers and 11 RBIs. The Angels like the switch-hitting Conger — who has always hit and has come a long way with his footwork and receiving skills behind the plate — but they need him to correct his throwing issues, which led to three errant throws on Sunday to up his spring total to at least five.

With rosters being pared down this time of year, the Angels will look to the waiver wire to add a steady, inexpensive, veteran presence behind the plate. They have an open spot on the 40-man roster after slipping Bobby Cassevah, now with the Rockies, through waivers. They’ll have some competition, though, with the Phillies, Pirates and Rays also looking for catching help, according to MLB.com’s Peter Gammons.

The Angels still believe in Conger. So in the event of an acquisition, they’re likely to option him to Triple-A to start the season so he can find the consistent release point that has eluded him. Conger has one option year left. John Hester (on the 40-man) and Luke Carlin (a non-roster invitee) are the other two catchers technically vying for the backup job, but both have had very inconsistent time in the Majors throughout their careers.

Alden

Vernon: ‘I want to play for the Angels’

Vernon WellsIf it wasn’t already obvious (it should’ve been), then the Phillies’ recent signing of Delmon Young seemingly sealed it: Vernon Wells and his bloated contract will be with the Angels in 2013. At least the early part of it.

The Phillies were one of few teams linked to Wells this offseason, and the fact they were only willing to guarantee Young $750,000 (with bonuses that can ramp it up to $3.5 million) is perhaps an indication of how dry the market for Wells is at this point.

The Angels expect to absorb a vast majority of the $42 million owed to Wells over the next two years in any trade, but they won’t give him away. They still feel he can contribute — as a right-handed power hitter and the first outfielder off the bench; perhaps even as insurance if Peter Bourjos gets off to a rough start — and they’d want to replace him via free agency if he departed anyway.

So, for the first time in his career, Wells will show up to Spring Training as a clear reserve, behind Bourjos, Mike TroutJosh Hamilton and DH Mark Trumbo in the outfield pecking order.

On Monday, 17 days before position players take their physicals in Tempe, Ariz., Wells joined “Angels Talk” hosts Victor Rojas and Terry Smith AM 830 KLAA. Asked about his diminished role, he took the high road — he always does — and didn’t really seem too bothered by it.

Here’s a partial transcript:

On being hurt the last couple years …

“I think that’s just part of the process. I don’t think it matters where you are in your career. You’re going to have some frustrating times, and unfortunately the last couple years have been frustrating, not only for myself, but for a lot of outsiders also. I think that’s what the offseasons are for, to kind of get a chance to regroup and refocus, and I think the thing for me moving forward is I have to be comfortable. I have to just relax and go play the game like I did when I was a kid. I don’t think I’ve done that as much as I’ve needed to.”

On the preparation going into a season when he’ll probably come off the bench …

“I think every athlete prefers just to be in the best shape they can and for whatever’s thrown at him in Spring Training. I don’t know exactly what the role is going to be. I think it’s been documented what it could be. But for me, as a competitor, you have to go in and be ready to fight. I think that’s what everyone wants to do and everybody’s going to do, because in order for this team to achieve what it needs to, everyone has to be thinking that way.”

On whether the trade rumors have bothered him …

“No, not at all. I put myself in that position, so I can’t get mad about it. I think that’s pretty obvious. You live and you learn. I’ve enjoyed my last two years, even though it’s been frustrating at times, but everything you go through you learn from it, and sometimes it takes a month, sometimes it takes a year, and sometimes it takes two years to kind of get everything straightened out. But I like the opportunity I’m going to get, and I’m going to run with whatever they tell me to do.”

On whether he’d prefer to go to a team with a more prominent role …

“I want to play, and I want to play for the Angels. But I have to earn that. That’s an easy question to answer. I want to be an Angel and I want to play. If I don’t get the opportunity to play, then obviously I need to continue to work harder because I still want to wear the uniform. I want to be able to really show what I can do, and I haven’t been able to do that the last couple of years. There’s still a lot to show some Angel fans. I’m looking forward to the opportunity to do that, and if I don’t get it, then so be it.”

Alden 

Is this the end of Frieri’s closing days? …

The Angels are closing in on a one-year agreement with Ryan Madson.

And if the deal does indeed get finalized (it can happen as early as Tuesday), you have to figure it’s so that Madson eventually becomes the closer. Recovery from Tommy John surgery may not have him ready by Opening Day, and he’ll probably need a tune-up before resuming the ninth inning (see: Nathan, Joe in 2011). But part of the appeal for Madson to sign this early, and take a low-base, high-incentive salary, is to close on a contending team. And surely the Angels sold him on that.

That would move Ernesto Frieri to the eighth inning, one year after being one of baseball’s biggest surprises.

Frieri was basically unhittable shortly after coming over from the Padres in early May, finishing the year with a 2.32 ERA, a .96 WHIP, 13.3 strikeouts per nine innings and 23 saves in 26 chances. But Madson was one of the game’s best late-inning relievers from 2008-11, posting a 2.86 ERA and a 1.18 WHIP while averaging 68 innings, 68 strikeouts and 18 walks per season. He has the better track record, is less prone to walks and went 32-for-34 in saves with the Phillies in 2011 (giving up only two homers despite pitching out of Citizens Bank Park).

So, that probably means Frieri is the setup man, with Kevin Jepsen in the seventh, Scott Downs as a floater and the likes of Nick Maronde, Jordan Walden, etc. filling out the ‘pen (though the offseason is still very young). Here’s what Jerry Dipoto told me early in the offseason about Frieri and his plans for the ninth. Appropriate on a day like today, methinks …

“We didn’t acquire Ernie with the idea that he was going to step in as our closer. We acquired him with the idea that he was going to help us get the last nine outs and he earned being the closer. That wasn’t the design. Obviously, if our staff remained unchanged, then he has a very good chance to be that guy again. But we’ll cross that bridge when we get to it. Ernie had a fabulous year. It’s very easy to lose track with the two emotional losses versus Texas and Kansas City down towards the end how good this guy was all year. It was phenomenal how big an impact he made on our season and on our team. One thing I’m certain of is that Ernesto in 2012 was a huge advantage to us and we have every expectation that he’s going to be just as high an impact in 2013. But like the question I answered a year ago, we’ll go into the offseason with the idea that Ernie is our ninth-inning guy, and we’re going to try to craft a group in that bullpen that works, and however most effectively we can get those last nine outs, we’ll get them.” 

Alden

Angels in the Arizona Fall League …

The 20th Arizona Fall League season starts Tuesday, with the Angels — along with the Giants, Nationals, Phillies and Red Sox — sending prospects to make up the Scottsdale Scorpions. The Rising Stars Game is Nov. 3 (Salt River Fields at Talking Stick) and the championship game for the six-team league will be Nov. 17 (Scottsdale Stadium).

Last year, Mike Trout played in this event. This year, Randal Grichuk — who’s known mostly for being drafted a spot before Trout but has quietly put together a nice season — is going. Nick Maronde was going to go, but since he missed the early part of the year with a strained lat muscle and he pitched through September, the Angels decided that he hold off. Veteran-ish reliever Bobby Cassevah is taking his place.

The one to watch here, though, will be 20-year-old third baseman Kaleb Cowart, who became the Angels’ top-ranked prospect after a solid A ball season. Below is the full slate of Angels representatives. Carlos Ramirez is on the taxi squad, which means he’ll only be activated Wednesdays and Saturdays. Brandon Emanuel, pitching coach for Class A Inland Empire, is part of the Scorpions’ coaching staff.

LHRP Buddy Boshers

Draft: 4th round, 2008
Age: 24
2012 (A+,AA): 2.98 ERA, 45 G (11 GF), 63 1/3 IP, 10.7 K/9, 3.0 BB/9, 1.25 WHIP
Career (5 seasons): 3.81 ERA, 150 G (34 GS, 26 GF), 324 IP, 8.5 K/9, 3.3 BB/9, 2.56 WHIP
MLB.com prospect rank: Unranked

RHRP Bobby Cassevah

Draft: 34th round, 2004
Age: 27
2012 (A+, AAA): 5.79 ERA, 49 G (18 GF), 51 1/3 IP, 5.6 SO/9, 3.7 BB/9, 1.66 WHIP
Career (8 seasons): 4.53 ERA, 268 G (14 GS, 96 GF), 401 2/3 IP, 6.1 SO/9, 4.5 BB/9, 1.59 WHIP
MLB.com prospect rank: Unranked
Cassevah isn’t what you would call a prospect, by any stretch, combining to make 46 appearances in the Majors from 2010-11 (posting a 2.87 ERA and a 1.30 WHIP). But he began the season on the disabled list with shoulder inflammation and never quite got right throughout the year — making four appearances in the Majors and struggling mightily in the PCL — which is probably why he wants to get more work in this fall.

RHRP Ryan Chaffee

Drafted: 3rd round, 2008
Age: 24
2012 (A+, AA): 2.60 ERA, 55 G (21 GF), 65 2/3 IP, 11.5 SO/9, 4.9 BB/9, 1.17 WHIP
Career (4 seasons): 5.36 ERA, 132 G (58 GS, 27 GF), 393 IP, 8.8 SO/9, 4.6 BB/9, 1.47 WHIP
MLB.com prospect rank: Unranked

RHRP Kevin Johnson

Drafted: 20th round, 2010
Age: 24
2012 (AA, AAA): 3.69 ERA, 56 G (41 GF), 18 SV, 63 1/3 IP, 4.4 SO/9, 2.3 BB/9, 1.39 WHIP
Career (3 seasons): 4.34 ERA, 121 IP (10 GS, 72 GF), 193 IP, 6 SO/9, 3.2 BB/9, 1.48 WHIP
MLB.com prospect rank: Unranked

C Carlos Ramirez

Drafted: 8th round, 2009
Age: 24
Bats: Right
2012 (AA): .204/.312/.276, 2 HR, 23 RBI, 85 G
Career (4 seasons): .269/.371/.416, 25 HR, 134 RBI, 291 G
MLB.com prospect rank: 19th on Angels
Prospect reportRamirez still has some things to work out offensively, as his numbers haven’t shown much consistency from league to league. Though he’s notched a very respectable average across four levels, the disparity between his performance in the hitter-friendly California League and each of his other stops leaves some room for concern. Ramirez is a strong defensive backstop, knows how to handle a pitching staff and has the makeup that should allow him to be an everyday catcher. If the bat doesn’t come around, his glove could land him a job as a backup at the highest level.

3B Kaleb Cowart

Drafted: 1st round (18th overall), 2010
Age: 20
Bats: Switch
2012 (A, A+): .276/.358/.452, 16 HR, 103 RBI, 14 SB, 135 G
Career (3 seasons): .275/.349/.437, 24 HR, 150 RBI, 25 SB, 214 G
MLB.com prospect rank: 1st on the Angels, 46th overall
Prospect reportCowart is a switch-hitter with a lot of bat speed that generates plus raw power from both sides of the plate. He started tapping into that power more consistently as he’s started to mature and learn the strike zone better. He’s athletic and has decent speed, which should help him stay at third long term. So will the plus arm that made him a legitimate pitching prospect in high school. He handled full-season ball well, earning a promotion from Class A to the Class A Advanced California League in June.

OF Randal Grichuk

Drafted: 1st round (24th overall), 2009
Age: 21
Bats: Right
2012 (A+): .298/.335/.488, 18 HR, 71 RBI, 16 SB, 135 G
Career (4 seasons): .296/.331/.507, 39 HR, 195 RBI, 26 SB, 305 G
MLB.com prospect rank: 12th on the Angels
Prospect reportGrichuk may forever be paired witih the other high school outfielder taken by the Angels in the first round of the 2009 Draft. What that outfielder, Mike Trout, has done, speaks for itself, but Grichuk has had a harder time moving up the ladder, largely because of injury issues. Grichuk was actually taken one slot above Trout, but 2012 was his first season with more than 300 at-bats. When he’s healthy, he’s shown glimpses of the pop that made him a first rounder along with some base-stealing acumen. He needs more time to work on the holes in his swing, but he’s still young enough to tap into that raw power and be a run-producing corner outfielder, taking a positive step forward in 2012.

CF Travis Witherspoon

Drafted: 12th round, 2009
Age: 23
Bats: Right
2012 (A+,AA): .268/.350/.418, 13 HR, 48 RBI, 34 SB (11 CS), 121 G
Career (4 seasons): .264/.332/.417, 42 HR, 171 RBI, 110 SB, 373 G
MLB.com prospect rank: 7th on the Angels
Prospect reportWitherspoon has lots of tools and the potential to be an above-average everyday player when everything comes together. He has a solid arm and plus speed, and he knows how to run a route, making him an excellent defender in the outfield. On the other side of the ball, he has the strength and bat speed to hit for power but still has work left to do in taming his aggressive approach. He’s also a plus runner with good instincts and can do some damage on the basepaths, especially if he continues to develop patience and makes more contact at the plate. Witherspoon was promoted to Double-A Arkansas on June 20. He was placed on the disabled list on July 3, with a left quad strain.

Alden
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