Results tagged ‘ Mike Trout ’

Scioscia hopes to meet Hamilton ‘face-to-face’ …

The Angels are in Houston this weekend, and they hope to see Josh Hamilton for the first time in 2015.

“Hopefully we’ll connect with him face-to-face,” Angels manager Mike Scioscia said prior to Monday’s game against Hamilton’s former team, the Rangers. “Everybody’s been in touch with him, but we want to connect with him and just see where everything is. Hopefully we’ll get a chance to see him.”

Hamilton — without a locker at Tempe Diablo Stadium or Angel Stadium — has been in Houston since early February, rehabbing from surgery to his right A.C. joint while staying at a friend’s house. There’s a growing sense that Hamilton won’t play for the Angels this season, with the only question being whether the two sides can agree on a buyout for a contract that will pay him $83 million through the 2017 season.

The 33-year-old outfielder is not expected to stop by the visiting clubhouse at Minute Maid Park during the upcoming weekend series in Houston, a person with knowledge of the situation said.

Scioscia said the situation is “very frustrating” “on some levels.”

“It just seems like as you try to get more clarity, it seems like it’s getting foggier and foggier,” Scioscia said. “We’ll see where this is and where this leads, and just where Josh is. I think first and foremost, we’re hoping Josh is getting the help and support that he needs.”

Some additional notes from Monday …

  • Kole Calhoun is out of the lineup for a second straight game, with Collin Cowgill leading off and Matt Joyce starting against a lefty (both firsts). Calhoun took part in pregame activities, though, and expects to return Tuesday. He could be used as a pinch-hitter on Monday if needed, too.
  • Remember that Prince Fielder bunt against the Angels in Spring Training? Yeah, that won’t happen again. The Angels will have David Freese on the left side of the infield when he comes to bat tonight in case he tries it again. Freese will then move to where the shortstop is situated on two-strike counts.
  • Asked if Tuesday’s start for Triple-A Salt Lake will be Garrett Richards‘ last one before returning to the rotation, Scioscia said “possibly.” “We’re definitely going to err on the side of caution,” Scioscia added. “But if a guy is down there wasting pitches, you don’t want to get in that scenario. We’ll balance it out, see where Garrett is, get information from our medical staff and from our Triple-A staff and see where he is.”
  • Mike Trout didn’t hear from anybody on the Royals after his brief dust-up with Yordano Ventura on Sunday. “It was just one of those things,” Trout said. “I was playing my game. I hit a single, and things got a little chippy.”

Alden

And so it begins …

safeco-fieldOpening Day is finally here, and Safeco Field seems like a fitting place to start. It’s home to the team many have picked to win the American League West. And it kicks off with a matchup between Felix Hernandez and Jered Weaver, the two guys who have made the most consecutive Opening Day starts in the Majors (Hernandez at seven, Weaver at six).

But Opening Day is only a ceremonial thing. “One of 162,” as many say. The season is long and arduous. And by the end of it, what happens on Opening Day or even in the first series will be nothing but a distant memory (like last year, when the Mariners embarrassed the Angels with a lopsided sweep in Southern California at the start of April).

If the Angels want to win another division title, they’ll have to answer several questions over the course of these next six months. And below are the seven most prominent …

1. What becomes of Josh Hamilton?

It doesn’t take a rocket scientist to realize the Angels aren’t necessarily in a welcoming mood with Hamilton, who’s still recovering from shoulder surgery and won’t be suspended for a self-reported drug relapse. The tone of their statements after news broke — and what they’ve said privately leading up to it — made you wonder if they even want him around. He’s a very likable guy, but he hasn’t lived up to his massive contract and his latest relapse struck a nerve with the Angels’ brass (make of that what you will). He won’t be going away, though. He’s owed $83 million over the next three years, so the Angels have to see what they get out of him. How does he fit into the roster? What type of production does he provide in his age-34 season? And how does he mesh with a team that may be better off without him? It’ll be the most fascinating storyline this season.

2. How good is Garrett Richards?

Richards has yet to allow a run in three Minor League outings and could return to the rotation by April 19 if all goes well, which means he basically misses only two starts. How good will he be upon returning, though? As good as he was leading up to the season-ending left knee injury he suffered Aug. 20? If so, this Angels rotation — with Jered Weaver, C.J. Wilson, Matt Shoemaker and Hector Santiago set to open the season — is more dangerous than people think. If not, they’re very vulnerable. A lot rides on Richards’ 26-year-old right arm (not to mention that left knee).

3. What will the Angels get out of second base?

They aren’t fooling themselves into thinking they’ll replicate the production of Howie Kendrick. If C.J. Cron takes the next step in his maturation process (see: patience), David Freese stretches his last four months into a full season and Albert Pujols continues to look as good as he did this spring, they won’t need it. But replacement level production would be nice. Johnny Giavotella will get the first crack, but we may see many guys play second base this year.

4. Who gets the lefties out?

The Angels haven’t had a true lefty specialist since the 2012 version of Scott Downs, and Downs wasn’t really used as a lefty specialist. Last year, the Angels’ go-to reliever to get lefty hitters out was the right-handed Fernando Salas, who has a nice changeup that darts away from left-handed hitters. Ideally, they’d have that traditional left-on-lefty guy. Mike Scioscia has mentioned Cesar Ramos and Jose Alvarez as possibilities, but they’re multi-inning relievers who don’t have the big stuff that plays in that role. The next hope would be Santiago, but that would hinge on Andrew Heaney or Nick Tropeano developing well enough to warrant Santiago’s current rotation spot.

5. How do they upgrade the roster?

Even without saving any money on Hamilton’s contract, the Angels enter the season with $10 to $15 million of wiggle room. That’s what Arte Moreno said early in camp. It’s more payroll flexibility than they’ve had in a while, and they plan to use it. Question is, how? Do they get a second baseman, even though there aren’t many of them out there? (Chase Utley looks like a long shot, because of how intimidating his contract is and because of his no-trade clause). Do they get an outfield/DH bat? Do they get a starting pitcher (a lot of big names are entering their walk years)? Or do they add more bullpen pieces, like they did last year? June/July should be very eventful.

6. What kind of year does Mike Trout have?

You could reasonably expect a great one, considering he stays healthy. But how does he follow up a season that saw him win the AL MVP unanimously? We saw Trout transition into more of a power game last year, hitting more home runs and stealing fewer bases. But he’s only 23 years old, scary as that seems, and he’s still figuring out who he’s going to be in this game. My guess is he cuts down those strikeouts — I don’t know anyone who truly believes Trout is a 180-strikeout-a-year player — but doesn’t increase his stolen-base total by much. The Angels seem content with how often they sent Trout last year. Teams watch him closely and, far more relevant in this matter, steals cause a lot of wear and tear on the body.

7. Are the Angels better than the Mariners?

That’s probably what it’s going to come down to. The Mariners are a popular pick to win the division, because their rotation could be something fierce, their bullpen was one of the best in the game last season and their lineup got a big missing piece they needed in power hitter Nelson Cruz. But the Angels return the core group of a team that led the Majors in wins and finished second in run-differential last year. They’re starting a season with what should be a reliable bullpen for the first time since Jerry Dipoto came on board in October 2011 and they carry the confidence of succeeding with this group.

It should be interesting.

And to get you ready, here’s a look at our Opening Day content, in case you missed anything …

MORE LINKS! An updated depth chart is here, injury updates are here, pitching probables are here and a look at the top 30 prospects is here. You can follow me on Twitter, Instagram and Facebook. And you can subscribe to my weekly Angels podcast with Richard Justice here.

MLB.com compiled dozens of predictions on who will win each division, how the postseason will play out and where all the major individual awards will go. Below were my picks, if you’re interested …

NL East: Nationals
NL Central: Cardinals
NL West: Dodgers
AL East: Red Sox
AL Central: White Sox
AL West: Angels
NL Wild Cards: Marlins, Pirates
AL Wild Cards: Mariners, Indians
NL champion: Nationals
AL champion: Angels
World Series champion: Nationals
NL MVP: Giancarlo Stanton
NL Cy Young: Max Scherzer
NL Rookie of the Year: Kris Bryant
AL MVP: Josh Donaldson
AL Cy Young: Chris Sale
AL Rookie of the Year: Steven Souza

Feliz Opening Day!

Alden

Uncertainty remains for Josh Hamilton …

Josh Hamilton didn’t have a locker at the Angels’ Spring Training facility, and he currently doesn’t have one at Angel Stadium, either.

His old locker, tucked away in a back corner of the home clubhouse, now belongs to the new second baseman, Johnny Giavotella. The Angels said they didn’t assign Hamilton a locker because there are only 38 of them, and that’s the exact amount of players who needed one for the opener of a three-game, exhibition Freeway Series against the Dodgers on Thursday night.

The Angels were hopeful of getting clarity on Hamilton’s situation by the end of this week, but it looks like they’ll have to wait a little longer.

Major League Baseball Commissioner Rob Manfred recently told SiriusXM Radio that a decision on a potential suspension for the Angels’ outfielder will “probably” be made “shortly after” Opening Day, which means next week at the earliest.

“I think that we’ll have something on Hamilton in relatively short order — it probably has been a little slower just because he’s not available to play,” Manfred told SiriusXM Radio on Wednesday.

Thirteen days earlier, Manfred told the Associated Press he expected a resolution “before Opening Day,” but the timeline has been moved back, because a lot of factors still have to be weighed.

There are questions about how to account for Hamilton’s past transgressions, which occurred when he was a Minor League player and were not subject to the current Joint Drug Agreement. There may be leniency for a player who has done an admirable job of coping with an addiction since his reinstatement nearly nine years ago. And there’s involvement from the MLB Players Association, which seeks sympathy for Hamilton.

This much is clear: The issue is out of the Angels’ hands, and none of the players have any idea what will happen.

“We’re always obviously thinking about him,” Angels center fielder Mike Trout said. “He’s our teammate. But until we know more information, we really can’t do much. You can’t really think about him too much because you don’t know what’s going on. He’s our teammate. We’re always trying to figure out what’s going on with him. Everybody wants to know, and nobody has answers. It’s kind of been like that the last couple of weeks.”

Hamilton met with MLB officials in New York on Feb. 25 over what sources say was a drug-related relapse that occurred late in the offseason. Hamilton then remained in Houston, staying with a friend while recovering from right shoulder surgery. Angels officials have checked in with Hamilton sporadically to check on his injury rehab, most recently saying that he’s been taking swings off a tee.

Angels starter C.J. Wilson, a friend of Hamilton’s dating back to their days on the Rangers, has been in touch with the 33-year-old of late and said, “I feel like he’s doing everything he can to get ready to play baseball again.”

“I was very surprised that there was news about this at all, just because I didn’t really see it on the horizon,” Wilson said of Hamilton’s relapse. “He doesn’t seem to be a mopy, murky person. Every time I talk to him, he seems fine.”

Players who violate the JDA for a drug of abuse are initially placed in a treatment program, with the first violation of the program resulting in a suspension of 15-25 games, a second being 25-50, a third being 50-75 and a fourth being at least a full season. Players aren’t paid while suspended, but they are eligible for full salary retention in the first 30 days of a treatment program.

The length of his suspension will have a big impact on the Angels’ financial situation, considering he’s owed $23 million. A potential extension with closer Huston Street, entering his final season before free agency, won’t be finalized until there is more clarity with Hamilton. Once there is, the Angels will have to figure out how to fold him back into a team that may be well into its season by then.

First, they’ll play without him.

“I think we’re deep enough on the offensive side that we should be OK,” Angels manager Mike Scioscia said. “But you can’t plan on using what you don’t have.”

Hamilton was once a can’t-miss blue-chip prospect who spent four years away from baseball, fighting addiction. He made substantial strides, becoming a perennial All-Star in his five years with the Rangers and an inspiring story that captivated the nation and brought hope to addicts.

But he hasn’t met expectations since coming to the Angels on a five-year, $125 million contract in December 2012.

Hamilton batted .250 with 21 homers and 79 RBIs in 2013 and finished an injury-plagued ’14 season with a .263 batting average and 10 home runs in 89 games. He missed 10 weeks while recovering from left thumb surgery early in 2014, then spent almost all of September recovering from injuries along his right side — shoulder, trapezius, chest, ribcage — and went 0-or-13 in an AL Division Series sweep at the hands of the Royals.

Hamilton felt pain in his shoulder once he started swinging with full force again, requiring surgery on Feb. 4 to repair his right AC joint. The injury timeline was six to eight weeks, with the possibility of a return by May.

The fact he wouldn’t have been ready by now has made it easier to cope with the uncertainty.

“Josh isn’t ready to play baseball right now,” Scioscia said. “We’re just kind of business as usual and we’ll just take stuff one step at a time. You can’t answer questions until you’re really confirmed on exactly what they’re going to be. We’ll get the first step here shortly and just see what we’re dealing with.”

Alden

The midway point …

Rangers Angels Spring BaseballWe’ve reached the midway point of the Angels’ Cactus League schedule. Whether that came fast or slow is merely a matter of your own perspective. But we’re here. 14 down, 14 to go, with an off day (sort of) conveniently placed in the middle and the three-game, exhibition Freeway Series following the Angels’ stint in Arizona.

Here’s what we’ve learned so far …

Second base really is wide open: And I’m not really sure if that’s good. Thing is, none of the three candidates for the everyday role have really stuck out. Grant Green (7-for-23) hasn’t looked comfortable defensively, Josh Rutledge (7-for-31, eight strikeouts) hasn’t hit and Johnny Giavotella (5-for-20) hasn’t done anything to wow you on either end. One guy who has looked good to me is Taylor Featherston, who’s being groomed for the utility-infield job. I like his defense, I like his speed, and his bat may be starting to come around. But I view second base the same way I did at the start of camp: We’ll either see a lot of different guys play the position this year, or we’ll see the Angels go after someone (Chase Utley?).

The rotation order is not: It’s pretty clear that, barring injury, the Angels’ rotation will line up in this order to start the season: Jered Weaver, C.J. Wilson, Matt Shoemaker, Hector Santiago, Andrew Heaney. Yes, the fifth spot was deemed an open competition between Santiago, Heaney and Nick Tropeano, but here’s the thing: (1) Garrett Richards is pretty much guaranteed to start the season on the disabled list, because the Angels are being extra, extra cautious with his rehab, as expected; (2) with Richards on the DL, it’s senseless to have both Tropeano and Heaney in your rotation and Santiago in the ‘pen, as opposed to having Heaney or Tropeano in Triple-A, because it messes with your starting-pitching depth; (3) Heaney and Tropeano have been pitching on the same day, but Heaney started the first one, pitched the home half of a split squad in the second and will start against the Dodgers on Thursday, with Tropeano relegated to pitching in a “B” game. It’s Heaney’s spot to lose, and he’s done nothing to lose it thus far.

A big decision with Santiago awaits: Richards will be ready some time around the middle of April, if his rehab continues to go well. At that point, the Angels will have a big decision to make with Santiago, who has posted a 3.58 ERA in 106 games (51 starts) in the Majors the last three years. Do they keep him in the rotation and send Heaney (or Tropeano) to Triple-A? Do they move him to the bullpen, even though he seems somewhat redundant with Cesar Ramos (another lefty who pitches multiple innings and doesn’t profile as a left-on-left specialist)? Do they use him as trade bait? I can see any of those three scenarios taking place, but I’d be somewhat shocked if they sent him to Triple-A, like they did in May of last season.

The Angels will have two lineups: Assuming Rutledge gets the first crack at the second-base job (that’s what it’s looked like all along), this looks like the lineup against righties: Calhoun/Trout/Pujols/Joyce/Freese/Aybar/Cron/Iannetta/Rutledge. This looks like the one against lefties, on most days: Calhoun/Trout/Pujols/Freese/Aybar/Cron/Joyce/Iannetta/Rutledge. Mike Scioscia still needs to figure out how often he’ll use the right-handed-hitting Collin Cowgill to sit Matt Joyce against lefties, and whether he’ll have a left-handed bat to sit C.J. Cron against tough righties. And that brings me to my next point …

Efren Navarro looks like a good fit: I didn’t have Navarro in my projected Opening Day roster at the start of Cactus League games, mainly because I felt they’d keep Giavotella (out of options) to maintain as many options as possible for the second-base job. But Navarro looks like an ideal fit for the last bench spot. He’s a patient left-handed hitter who can sit Cron against tough righties, he plays great defense at first base and he’s more than adequate in the corner-outfield spots. Getting 10 hits in his first 26 at-bats hasn’t hurt, either.

Cory Rasmus won’t be a starting pitcher: Well, he won’t be in the traditional sense. Scioscia said recently that Rasmus won’t be stretched out to the 100-, 110-pitch range, but will still be stretched out somewhat in case the Angels need some length. This only validates what I anticipated all along: Rasmus will crack the Opening Day bullpen as a long reliever, basically being used in the same role he pitched in down the stretch last year. It’s a nice role for him.

Mike Trout is really good: He has 12 hits in his first 22 at-bats, and three of them have gone over fences. He also has the same amount of strikeouts as he has stolen bases (3). What else do you want?

Albert Pujols looks good: Several members of the Angels feel Pujols is poised for an even better year now that he’s even healthier in his lower half, and he’s looked good so far, going 8-for-25 and hitting the ball hard to right-center field. The latter is key for him.

David Freese is going to be really important: I think he’s the Angels’ most important everyday player, because they’ll be counting on him to provide additional pop in the middle with Howie Kendrick and Josh Hamilton not there and because he’ll probably be playing all nine innings now that the Angels don’t have a natural defensive sub. Of the four second base/utility infield candidates, Featherston has looked the best at third, but he hasn’t played above Double-A, so I doubt the Angels will be putting him in games with a one-run lead in the ninth.

Richards still throws hard: Besides occasionally having a hard time burying the breaking ball, Richards’ stuff has looked about as explosive as it usually does this spring, which is a very good sign.

Cron looks good: Sometimes he’ll strikeout chasing the fastball up near his head. You’re going to get that with Cron, who chased the same percentage of pitches outside the strike zone as Hamilton last season. But Cron has also driven the ball well this spring, hitting long home runs to left and some well-struck doubles to right-center. If Freese is the No. 1 most important member of the lineup, Cron is 1B. He’s the wild card.

It’s Lindstrom’s job to lose: if Rasmus is in the Opening Day bullpen, then only one spot is open (the others go to Huston Street, Joe Smith, Mike Morin, Fernando Salas and Ramos). Matt Lindstrom looks like an ideal candidate for that final spot, because he still throws pretty hard (few others in the ‘pen do), has a good track record and is an XX(B) free agent, which means he has the right to opt out of his contract (or make an additional $100,000 as a retention bonus) if not on the Opening Day roster. But he has to earn it. And aside from giving up two runs on three hits on March 12 — while pitching in the inning when Will Ferrell played center field — Lindstrom has looked good. If Lindstrom doesn’t make it, I expect Vinnie Pestano to be in the ‘pen. Pestano has options, though.

Alden

ST Game No. 8: Angels 10, Cubs 9 …

Spring Training Ferrell BaseballWill Ferrell took Mike Trout‘s glove and position, held up giant signs while coaching third base and struck out against a former Major League pitcher. It was an eventful day at Tempe Diablo Stadium, where professional baseball was also played.

Most important thing: Trout was on point, before and after being subbed out by Will Ferrell in center field. He went 3-for-3 with two doubles, two RBIs and two runs scored, also drawing a walk and picking up a stolen base. His Cactus League batting average is now at .500.

Second-most important thing: Sean Newcomb couldn’t finish his inning, giving up two runs on three hits and a walk and recording only two outs in the first. He topped out at 95 and broke a few bats; he just didn’t have much luck.

Third-most important thing: Bullpen candidates Matt Lindstrom and Frank Herrmann combined to give up six runs on seven hits and two walks in 1 2/3 innings. “Matt just missed with a couple pitches; his stuff is good and he’s having a good spring” Mike Scioscia said. “Herrmann was just missing with some pitches; got into bad counts. But both their arms are good.”

Fourth-most important thing: Albert Pujols, C.J. Cron, Collin Cowgill and Drew Butera each had two-hit games. Cron and Butera (!) homered.

Best defensive play (that I actually saw): Erick Aybar dove full extension to his right to snag a Mike Olt liner in the first.

Quotable: Zach Stewart, on coming in to face Ferrell: “He’s a menacing figure at the plate, so I knew I had to bring my best stuff to get him out.”

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Alden

C.J. Wilson expects to take his next turn …

C.J. Wilson was supposed to start today, but he tweaked his left knee during a PFP drill and decided to take some time off. The Angels’ left-hander got a precautionary MRI that checked out fine. He’s slated to throw a bullpen session on Saturday and then take his next turn on Tuesday.

The lineups for Will Ferrell Day

Kole Calhoun, RF
Mike Trout, CF
Albert Pujols, 1B
Matt Joyce, LF
David Freese, 3B
Erick Aybar, SS
C.J. Cron, DH
Drew Butera, C
Josh Rutledge, 2B

SP: LH Sean Newcomb

  • Newcomb won’t pitch that much. He’ll throw the first inning, then perhaps face a batter or two in the second. The 21-year-old left-hander, drafted 15th overall last June, will get stretched out in Minor League camp later in spring.
  • Matt Lindstrom, Cesar Ramos, Ryan Mattheus and Frank Herrmann are among those also slated to pitch.
  • Garrett Richards is tentatively slated to pitch in another two-inning simulated game over the weekend, this time with pitchers’ fielding practice mixed in, and then he’ll be ready to pitch in his first Cactus League game perhaps middle or late next week. Mike Scioscia said he’ll probably only just throw one inning in his first game. “Some parts of it he’s moving into more of a Spring Training environment, but that part of it is definitely something you want to watch closely,” Scioscia said.
  • Huston Street is back with the team after getting sick right before game time Tuesday and staying in his room on Wednesday. He’ll throw a bullpen session on Saturday and expects to pitch in a game on Sunday.
  • Joe Smith has yet to appear in his first Spring Training game because of lower leg stiffness. He said if it were the regular season, he would’ve only missed a couple days. “It’s just one of those things early in spring, they just wanted me out there with nothing,” Smith said. He should pitch in the next couple days. He’s got plenty of time to be ready for the season. “I think I’m still loose from last year.”
  • The overwhelming favorite Will Ferrell movie in the Angels clubhouse is “Step Brothers.” Calhoun said he watched it three times in theaters, twice on DVD. “It’s one of those movies that get funnier every time you watch it.” Most of the guys were bummed that they may not get much time with him, since he’s hitting up five different games.
  • The Angels completed their annual, Spring Training toy drive, raising $5,000 to purchase toys that will be donated to Children’s First Academy. Sherman Johnson was in charge of collecting money and purchasing the toys this year.
  • Cubs lineup is here.

Alden

Wilson scratched; Newcomb to start Thursday …

Angels starter C.J. Wilson has been scratched from his scheduled Thursday start against the Cubs after tweaking his left knee during pitchers’ fielding practice a couple days ago, Mike Scioscia said. Sean Newcomb, the 21-year-old left-hander who was drafted 15th overall last June, will start in his place.

Wilson didn’t take part in agility drills with his teammates Wednesday morning, but did play catch.

Scioscia said Wilson is “fine; we just want to give him a couple days to get over it.” The Angels’ manager isn’t concerned about this holding him back in spring.

“I think [pitching coach Mike Butcher] has a flexible program of where these guys need to be and they start early enough to where you can absorb a little bump like this,” Scioscia said. “We can even push him back a full five days and he’ll be OK.”

Here’s Wednesday’s lineup against the D-backs, which is their first time facing a lefty starter (Robbie Ray) this spring …

Kole Calhoun, RF
Mike Trout, CF
Albert Pujols, 1B
David Freese, 3B
Erick Aybar, SS
Chris Iannetta, C
Matt Joyce, DH
Collin Cowgill, LF
Grant Green, 2B

SP: RH Jered Weaver

  • This could very well be the Angels’ lineup against lefties, particularly with Freese at the cleanup spot and Joyce moved down to seventh. Scioscia said he’d like to get righties Cowgill and C.J. Cron at-bats against lefties, so Joyce could sit against some tough lefties. It’ll be up to him. His playing time against lefties could hinge largely on how he handles them this spring. “We’ll see how Matty handles it,” Scioscia said. “When he’s going well, you don’t want to take him out just because there’s two lefties in a row. You don’t want him sitting down for two days.”
  • Closer Huston Street is not with the team today. He started feeling really sick right before game time on Tuesday, was scratched from his scheduled appearance and stayed back Wednesday, recovering.
  • Setup man Joe Smith has yet to appear in his first game because of some “lower leg stiffness.” He was slated to throw a bullpen session on Thursday and should pitch in the next three to four days, Scioscia said.
  • Here is the D-backs lineup (no Mark Trumbo).

Alden

ST Game No. 5: Reds 7, Angels 5 …

Angels Spring BaseballMost important thing: Andrew Heaney (pictured) looked OK in his Cactus League debut, giving up a hit and a run, walking two and striking out three (including Joey Votto) in his three-inning outing. His main competition for a rotation spot, Nick Tropeano, struggled with his fastball command and it hurt with three straight long drives in the fifth — a double by Skip Schumaker off the right-center-field wall, a homer by Kyle Skipworth right around the same place and another homer to left by Jason Bourgoeis.

Second-most important thing: Up one with two on and one out in the bottom of the ninth, Ryan Mattheus — a long shot to make the Opening Day bullpen — served up a line-drive, walk-off three-run homer off the top of the right-field fence to Reds Minor League outfielder Juan Duran. It was the third straight game the Angels have lost in the ninth inning, after Edgar Ibarra gave up a couple of runs to the A’s on Saturday and Jeremy McBryde gave up four runs to the Royals on Sunday. You can officially get worried if it happens to Joe Smith and Huston Street.

Third-most important thing: Albert Pujols went 2-for-3 and drove in a couple with a line-drive single up the middle in the third. That’s four hits in the last two days for the Angels’ first baseman.

Fourth-most important thing: Johnny Giavotella sent a high fastball out to left-center field, Grant Green and Josh Rutledge each had opposite-field hits, and Taylor Featherston singled to left and stole a base. And that was your second base update for the day.

Fifth-most important thing: Mike Trout drew a walk on four straight pitches with first base open in the third and hit an infield single off Aroldis Chapman in the fifth. And that was your Mike Trout update for the day.

Best defensive play (that I actually saw): Non-roster outfielder Roger Kieshnick tracked a long fly ball from Brayan Pena, leaped up against the right-field fence and made a nifty catch for the second out of the sixth.

Quotable: Mike Scioscia on Tropeano and Heaney: ““For their first outing, they did fine. Chris [Iannetta] is trying to work with them to understand their stuff a little bit. It’s gonna take a little time. But I think the first impressions were very good. Nick Tropeano has terrific stuff. He just missed with his fastballs and those guys crushed them. Heaney looked strong. He has a lot of his life to his fastball.”

Alden

Matt Joyce: ‘I’ll be in there tomorrow’ …

Angels outfielder Matt Joyce took the last couple of days off due to stiffness in his right side but expects to be back in the lineup on Tuesday, when the Angels host the Rangers at Tempe Diablo Stadium.

Joyce took some swings on Monday morning and said he feels “great.” The 30-year-old left-handed hitter felt soreness from swinging the bat on Saturday and the Angels told him to take a couple of days off as a precaution.

“I guess it’s just one of those things — it’s early, and every time you deal with your side, there’s a chance of having the oblique involved,” Joyce said. “They really want to be cautious. I’m not worried about it.”

A lot of starters are playing in back-to-back games for the second time this spring, and traveling all the way to Goodyear to do it …

Kole Calhoun, RF
Mike Trout, CF
Albert Pujols, 1B
Erick Aybar, SS
C.J. Cron, DH
Chris Iannetta, C
Collin Cowgill, LF
Josh Rutledge, 2B
Kyle Kubitza, 3B

SP: LH Andrew Heaney

  • Nick Tropeano will also pitch, which officially makes this the start of what should be a fun competition between Tropeano and Heaney for a rotation spot. With Garrett Richards slated to start the season on the disabled list and Hector Santiago having far more experience, it could very well come down to these two.
  • Richards is slated to do some more pitchers’ fielding practice on Monday morning, which involves covering first base and basically simulating the play that led to a ruptured left patellar tendon on Aug. 20. Richards will throw to hitters for the second time on Tuesday and looks to be on track for Cactus League games by early next week. Mike Scioscia said he’s doing the PFP drills “as hard as he can.” “He really showed no favoring of his gait,” Scioscia said. “Right now there’s a conditioning component he needs, but he’s doing fine.”
  • The Angels expect Cuban infielder Roberto Baldoquin to report for Spring Training at some point this week. Baldoquin has been delayed by visa issues in the Dominican Republic. He was slated to spend the spring in Minor League camp, which recently began, but Angels coaches were looking forward to having him on the Major League side for drills earlier in camp.
  • Cesar Ramos, Matt Lindstrom, Frank Herrmann, Ryan Mattheus, Danny Reynolds, Scott Snodgress and Edgar Ibarra are also slated to pitch today.
  • Reds lineup is here.

Alden

Lineups and Notes, ST Game 2 …

The first five hitters are starting off the Cactus League schedule playing in back-to-back games and the Angels’ Opening Day starter gets his first outing against the Rockies …

Kole Calhoun, RF
Mike Trout, CF
Albert Pujols, 1B
Matt Joyce, DH
Erick Aybar, SS
Collin Cowgill, LF
Drew Butera, C
Grant Green, 2B
Kyle Kubitza, 3B

SP: RH Jered Weaver

  • When Cesar Ramos was acquired in early November, the Angels made him one promise and only one promise: “You’ll pitch.” It was a refreshing sentiment for the 30-year-old left-hander who frequently went 15 days without pitching in Tampa Bay. Angels manager Mike Scioscia said “his best role is to match up against a lefty. He spins the ball wall, but he can give you long or multi-innings if you have to.” Ramos has never really been used as a lefty specialist. He has a four-pitch mix, but could shorten that if he’s pitching to only one or two batters a game. Scioscia said the Angels “need enough length in our staff” in order to free Ramos up to be a lefty specialist. The presence of Cory Rasmus could accomplish that.
  • Matt Harvey made his first post-Tommy John surgery start for the Mets on Friday, and Tyler Skaggs — in the early part of his own recovery from TJ — is monitoring his progress, as well as Jose Fernandez‘s. “I want to see how they do,” Skaggs said. “I would think that I’ll come back stronger, better. I want to see if these guys are going to do that.”
  • Andrew Heaney and Nick Tropeano will both pitch in Monday’s game, with Heaney likely starting. After that it’ll go to Hector Santiago once again. C.J. Wilson and Matt Shoemaker go Saturday and Sunday, respectively.
  • Rockies lineup here. In case you missed it, here’s a handy little Spring Training guide.

Alden

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