Results tagged ‘ Luis Jimenez ’

Door is open for a fast Angels start …

A strong belief in one’s roster is usually followed by a phrase like “as long as we stay healthy.”

Well, the American League West is anything but to start the season. The Rangers are littered with injuries, with starter Derek Holland (right knee), second baseman Jurickson Profar (right shoulder) and catcher Geovany Soto (knee) all out until midseason and Yu Darvish (neck) starting the year on the disabled list. A’s Opening Day starter Jarrod Parker will miss all of 2014 after undergoing his second Tommy John surgery and A.J. Griffin (right flexor muscle strain) is on the shelf. And the Mariners — in town the next three days — have two starters on the DL in Hisashi Iwakuma (right middle finger) and Taijuan Walker (right shoulder).

The door is wide open for the Angels.

Mike Scioscia, Jerry DipotoThey’ve had the fourth-worst April winning percentage the last two years, crippling any chances they had of reaching the playoffs. But of the Angels’ 27 games through the month of April this year, only nine will come against teams that made the playoffs in 2013. Four will come against an Astros team that has lost 100 games three straight years (though, granted, they won 10 of 19 games against the Angels last year), and three will come against the Mets, who haven’t been to the playoffs since 2006. But there’s one really tough swing — a three-city trip from April 18-27, which will see the Angels visit the Tigers, Nationals and Yankees.

The Angels will also be off in each of their first six Thursdays. Yes, you’d rather have the days off at the end of the year, but a fast start is crucial this year, and those off days certainly won’t hurt that cause.

In hopes of facilitating a better start, the Angels tweaked their Spring Training program. Position players took more swings and focused more on situational hitting. Starting pitchers were stretched out earlier. Relievers attacked their bullpens more aggressively. Live BP was re-introduced after a one-year hiatus. And more shifting is taking place defensively, after the Angels went from 2nd to 27th in Defensive Runs Saved over the course of one season.

One year after having by far the worst Spring Training record and ERA in the Majors, the Angels had a much better camp. Here’s a look at the numbers …

Record: 19-11-2, 2nd in the Cactus League
Runs: 190, 4th in MLB
OPS: .803, 3rd in MLB
SP ERA: 4.01, 11th in MLB
RP WHIP: 4.20, 4th in MLB

Josh Hamilton, Albert Pujols, Kole CalhounPositives from camp: Albert Pujols looked light on his feet around the bag and on the bases. … Josh Hamilton quickly got his timing back after missing time with a strained left hamstring. … Tyler Skaggs was mostly sitting at 95 mph, after having a hard time touching 90 mph last year. … Erick Aybar and Kole Calhoun — batting ninth and first, respectively, and ahead of Mike Trout — drew a combined 21 walks. … C.J. Wilson had a 1.88 ERA in 28 2/3 innings. … Ernesto Frieri didn’t allow a run in 10 outings. … Trout batted .414/.460/.828. … The Angels rid themselves of two potential distractions, releasing Joe Blanton and signing Trout to the much-talked-about extension. … Out-of-options infielder Andrew Romine was turned into much-needed starting-pitching depth in Jose Alvarez.

Negatives from camp: Sean Burnett is still working his way back from August surgery, but he’s expected to face hitters for the first time in a sim game on Tuesday or Wednesday. … Dane De La Rosa is starting the season on the DL with a right forearm strain, but he could be back as soon as the weekend series in Houston. … Brian Moran is working his way back from left elbow inflammation, leaving Nick Maronde (1.89 Cactus League WHIP) as the only lefty in the bullpen to start the year. … Skaggs and Hector Santiago had their occasional long innings, an indication that there will be some growing pains. … Newcomers David Freese (one extra-base hit) and Raul Ibanez (.218 batting average) didn’t have great results at the plate, but both were happy with the way they were driving the ball.

Now, what does all this mean for the regular season?

I have no idea.

***

The Angels’ depth chart can be found here.

Now, if you’ve followed baseball long enough you know that a team never goes an entire season with the same 25-man roster (or even the same five-man rotation). So, here’s a look at who’s next in line at every position …

Catcher: Luis Martinez
Third base: Luis Jimenez
Shortstop: Tommy Field
Second base: Grant Green
First base: C.J. Cron
Left field: J.B. Shuck
Center field: Matt Long
Right field: Brennan Boesch
Starter: Wade LeBlanc or Alvarez
Reliever: Brandon Lyon

***

Mike TroutOn that Trout contract

For months, many wondered how much Trout would be worth in the open market and speculated what it would cost to lock up the best all-around player in baseball. They put his three arbitration years at upwards of $60 million, had him pegged as a $35 million free agent and believed he could be baseball’s first $300-million player.

But three are three important things to keep in mind about Trout’s situation …

1. He isn’t in his free-agent years yet. He still needed to get through three arbitration years, which greatly limits how much a player can make.

2. Being a $300-million player would’ve probably required a 10-year, contract, and that wouldn’t have been ideal because Trout wants to cash in on another monster contract by hitting the open market before age 30.

3. There’s just as much incentive for Trout as there is for the Angels, no matter how great he is. Why? Because free agency is a whole four years away, a lot can happen in four years, and it’s hard to turn down that much financial security so early.

So, Trout’s contract is $144.5 million over the course of six seasons, from 2015-20 (with a full no-trade clause, basic incentives and no additional option years or opt-outs). And I think it gives both sides what they want. It gives the Angels three additional years of Trout and some cost-certainty. It gives Trout a chance to be a free agent again at age 29 and makes him the highest-paid player relative to service time at every juncture.

Here’s a look at the year-by-year breakdown, and who Trout surpasses …

2014: $1M (Pujols in 2003 and Ryan Howard in ’07 with $900K for a pre-arbitration player)*
2015: $10.25M (Howard, $10M in ’08 for first-year arbitration)**
2016: $15.25M (Howard, $15M in ’09 for second-year arbitration)
2017: $19.25M (Howard, $19M in ’10 for third-year arbitration)
2018-20: $33.25M (Miguel Cabrera, $31M AAV in ’14 for a free agent)

* the $1M compensation was done before the contract
** $5M of that will be paid to Trout in 2014, as part of a signing bonus

***

Jered WeaverSome questions, answered …

Can the Angels stay competitive for the next seven seasons to keep Trout’s interest in the team? (@ryanwjsmyth)

One of the reasons Trout felt comfortable staying with the Angels long term is because he knows the owner, Arte Moreno, isn’t afraid to put his money into making this team competitive. One thing is for sure: The Angels will not be in rebuild mode over the life of Trout’s contract, or even while Moreno is around. But it’ll be harder and harder to stay below the luxury tax and put a World Series-contending product on the field as Hamilton and Pujols naturally decline. Jerry Dipoto has a tough task at hand — continue to build a contending team while also developing young pitching. Getting Santiago and Skaggs is a good start, though. Also, keep in mind: Trout’s decision to stay will be based more on how good the Angels can be after 2020, not necessarily what they’ve done leading up to it.

Will Albert Pujols hit 30+ home runs this season? (@adreamersview)

If healthy, I think you can bank on that. He hit 30 in 2012 even though he went a month and a half without hitting his first (and I don’t expect that to happen again). Plantar fasciitis didn’t just limit his defense and baserunning. It made his right knee, surgically repaired the previous offseason, swell up. And it sapped his power because a hitter is nothing without a healthy base. I’m never going to doubt Pujols’ ability to hit. He’s proven it long enough.

If the Angels make a run for the postseason what do you see them doing at the trade deadline? (@gizmosol)

Trying to get their hands on more starting pitching. Justin Masterson and Max Scherzer are heading into their final seasons before free agency, Cliff Lee and David Price may get shopped, and all sorts of other starters could become available in July. The Angels still have roughly $15 million below the luxury-tax threshold that they’re willing to use. Yes, the farm system is still pretty barren. But the list of teams in the market for a starting-pitching rental in July is usually very short, and the Angels could dangle Cron or Taylor Lindsey or Kaleb Cowart or some of their (few) good pitching prospects if they feel they’re close (and hope for a better result than the 2012 trade for Zack Greinke).

***

Here are some links to our Opening Day coverage …

The Angels 2014 Season preview
Jered Weaver gets franchise-record sixth Opening Day nod
Ibanez reflects on what Opening Day means to him
Broadcaster Jose Mota talks about the upcoming season

Some feature stories from earlier in the spring, in case you missed them …

Weaver leads rotation’s quest for redemption
Pujols, Hamilton facing more doubt than ever
Mike Scioscia eager to reclaim winning formula
John McDonald “a magician” with the glove
The odyssey of De La Rosa, and a lesson in never giving up
Trout can’t believe how fast this is all happening

Alden

Hamilton batting 3rd, at DH, vs. Giants …

If you’re coming to Tempe Diablo Stadium today, you’re going to see Josh Hamilton — back at his customary 240 pounds — make his Spring Training debut. He’s batting third and serving as the designated hitter, and will get two or three at-bats.

St. Patrick’s Day is exactly two weeks from Opening Day, but Hamilton said Sunday that starting the season on the disabled list “isn’t even on the table,” even though he typically likes to get somewhere between 45 and 55 at-bats to get ready for the regular season. He can load up on at-bats in Minor League games, and he’s been taking part in live batting practice in each of the previous three days.

Some other notes from Monday morning (the two split squad lineups are here and here) …

  • Raul Ibanez, as you might have noticed, debuts at first base today — a position he hasn’t started since 2005. If Ibanez and/or Calhoun can prove capable of playing first base, then Scioscia won’t have to change his lineup on the days Albert Pujols DH’s.
  • Garrett Richards will pitch on the main field at Tempe Diablo Stadium at 1 p.m. PT during the Angels’ off day on Tuesday, against another organization’s Triple-A team. Hank Conger will catch, and Ernesto Frieri is also slated to pitch. Richards will get up at least six times.
  • Pujols got permission to leave the team today in order to attend an event benefiting the Pujols Family Foundation in Chicago. He’s expected back on Tuesday.
  • Speaking of Pujols, we’re five days away from the first official game of the regular season (in Australia), which is a good time to look at the Angels’ No. 5.
  • The Angels optioned five players to Triple-A Salt Lake: Right-handed reliever Josh Wall, left-handed reliever Buddy Boshers, first baseman Efren Navarro, third baseman Luis Jimenez and shortstop Tommy Field. They’re now at 44 players.
  • Mike Scioscia will stay at home to watch Hector Santiago; pitching coach Mike Butcher (and probably a ton of scouts) will go to Mesa, Ariz., to watch Joe Blanton.

Alden

ST Game 6: Giants 3, Angels 2 …

Albert PujolsMost important thing: Albert Pujols played in back-to-back games for the first time this spring, and started at first base for the fourth time in six games, and made two very nice diving stops. He also singled in his third at-bat, snapping an 0-for-9 skid.

Second-most important thing: Jered Weaver pitched four complete innings in his second start, giving up two runs (one earned) on four hits while giving up four hits, walking two and striking out two. Weaver said he “probably left a couple pitches up, a little excited, but other than that, I felt pretty good out there.”

Third-most important thing: Grant Green started at shortstop for the first time, playing six innings and handling the only two routine grounders hit to him — a slow roller that he changed and a charity hop he fielded slightly to his left. Angels manager Mike Scioscia said “at times he got a little too deep, but his throws across were good.” Green is expected to get a start at third base by the end of the week.

Fourth-most important thing: The Angels had two defensive blunders — on a fly ball Brennan Boesch lost in the sun and a slow roller that sneaked under Weaver’s legs before he recovered — but overall played a very strong defensive game, with nice plays by Luis Jimenez, Matt Long and Pujols.

Fifth-most important thing: Kevin Jepsen had a scoreless outing for the second straight time, giving up one hit and striking out one in the sixth.

Best defensive play (that I actually saw): With one out in the first, Giants shortstop Brandon Crawford smoked a liner to right field, but Pujols dove full-extension to his right, fielded it cleanly and made the flip to Weaver.

Best quote: Weaver, on the difference between Pujols this spring compared to last spring: “It’s night and day. Just the way he’s running around, the way he’s moving at first — just walking in general he looks more healthy.”

Angels’ record: 3-3

Alden

ST Game 4: Angels 3, D-backs 2 …

Most important thing: The Angels got their first taste of expanded instant replay. Angels manager Mike Scioscia used it to challenge a botched hit-and-run that saw Luis Jimenez get thrown out at second. Scioscia thought Aaron Hill missed the tag after fielding Bobby Wilson‘s high throw, but umpires upheld the call and Scioscia couldn’t challenge anything the rest of the day. The Angels have 14 more of these “replay games.”

Second-most important thing: Garrett Richards looked really good, breezing through three scoreless innings while giving up just two hits, walking none and striking out two. The 25-year-old right-hander looked great last spring, too, with a 1.45 ERA in 18 2/3 Cactus League innings.

Third-most important thing: Ernesto Frieri made his spring debut, after temporarily leaving the team while his wife gave birth on Friday, and pitched a 1-2-3 fourth inning.

Fourth-most important thing: Jimenez and outfielder Collin Cowgill, both competing for spots off the bench, each had two hits.

Fifth-most important thing: Only two regulars were in the Angels starting lineup (Kole Calhoun and platooning catcher Hank Conger). Most of the rest of the everyday players took part in a scrimmage at Tempe Diablo Stadium in the morning.

Best defensive play (that I saw): Hill smoked a line drive off Frieri to start the fourth, but Jimenez extended to his left and snared what looked like a sure single.

Best quote: Richards, when asked whether not having to fight for a job will alter his approach this spring: “These last two years, I’ve competed for a spot, so I know what it’s like to be on that end of the stick. I try keep the same mentality I’ve had every spring. Just because I’m in the rotation right now doesn’t mean I’ll be in the rotation at the end of the year. I have to stay sharp and improve.”

Alden

ST Game 2: Mariners 5, Angels 3 …

peoriaMost important thing: They got to play a little bit. Given the storms hitting Arizona in the morning, it almost seemed foolish for the Angels to take the 40-minute bus ride from Tempe to Peoria. But with storms shading north, there was a window to get at least some of Saturday’s game in. They ultimately played six and a half innings, with C.J. Wilson, four relievers and everyone in the starting lineup getting their full-day’s work before the heavy rain came down.

Second-most important thing: Wilson looked sharp while striking out the side in the first, but got hit around in the second, facing seven batters, giving up two smoking line drives to center field — one of which would’ve gone out for a home run if not for a giant fence — and allowing two runs to come across. The 33-year-old left-hander called his April last year “average,” and felt his season would’ve gone from good to great if he had started off the season a little bit better. So he’s looking to be more aggressive out of the gate this spring. In his first Cactus League start, he threw all of his offspeed pitches.

Third-most important thing: Seven of those in the Angels’ starting lineup — J.B. Shuck, Ian Stewart, Hank Conger, Carlos Pena, Chad Tracy, Collin Cowgill, Andrew Romine and John McDonald — are among those competing for three bench spots. Grant Green, Luis Jimenez, Tommy Field and Brennan Boesch were folded in later, an indication that they’re on the outside looking in — which is no surprise. Green was the only player to have a multi-hit game, going 2-for-2 with a double and an RBI.

Fourth-most important thing: Mike Morin, ranked eighth in the Angels’ system and coming off a very solid year at Class A Advanced and Double-A, was hit hard while coming in relief of Wilson in the third, putting four consecutive runners on and allowing two runs to score.

Best defensive play (that I actually saw): For the second straight day, it’s a tie between two guys battling for a spot. With two outs in the third, Shuck leaped up against the left-field fence to rob Mike Zunino of extra bases and save Morin from further  damage. To start the fourth, Cowgill dived forward full extension to snare a hard line drive off the bat of Carlos Triunfel.

Best quote: Wilson, on pitchers being pushed harder this spring: “It sends a good message when you get a phone call in the offseason and they say, ‘Hey, we’re going to expect a little bit more out of you this year in Spring Training.’ I think the average guy comes in in better shape because of that. The one thing that we haven’t had the last couple years is durability out of the starters as a whole. That’s the goal, obviously, is to get more durability out of the starters.”

Alden

Game 151: Angels-Athletics …

Angels (73-77)

CALJ.B. Shuck, DH
Howie Kendrick, 2B
Mike Trout, CF
Josh Hamilton, LF
Mark Trumbo, 1B
Kole Calhoun, RF
Erick Aybar, SS
Chris Iannetta, C
Andrew Romine, 3B

SP: RH Garrett Richards (7-6, 3.91 ERA)

Athletics (88-62)

OAKCoco Crisp, CF
Daric Barton, 1B
Josh Donaldson, 3B
Brandon Moss, LF
Yoenis Cespedes, DH
Josh Reddick, RF
Alberto Callaspo, 2B
Stephen Vogt, C
Eric Sogard, SS

SP: RH Sonny Gray (3-3, 2.63 ERA)

  • Chris Nelson‘s season looked finished when he suffered a strained hamstring on Aug. 28. Today, he was activated off the disabled list. Mike Scioscia said he’ll initially be available as a defensive replacement and pinch-hitter, and may work his way back towards playing third base regularly. “With hamstrings you never know,” Scioscia said. “But when he came off the field, you were thinking man, this is not good on the timing of the season, how long it will take. He’s worked really hard; definitely available to play defense and ran well enough that hopefully he’s day-to-day before he can get out there and start playing and get some at-bats.”
  • Luis Jimenez, however, is still “a ways away” from getting back, Scioscia said. His right shoulder remains sore, and he has a ways to go before being able to throw again. So, he’s probably done for the year.
  • Trout’s home run was initially thought to be 420 feet. But after coming back up from the clubhouse, ESPN’s Home Run Tracker put it at 452 feet. That distance was still not enough for Scioscia. “At 452, that ball is still in the air past that fence. I’m sorry. That ball is 500 feet.”
  • Cool stat from the game notes: Trout is one double and one triple shy of being the first ever member of the 10-20-30-40 club (10 triples, 20 homers, 30 steals, 40 doubles) in Major League history. Trout is at 9-24-33-39.

Alden

Game 144: Angels-Blue Jays …

Pretty fitting that the Angels and Blue Jays — two clubs with bloated payrolls, high expectations and underachieving 2013 seasons — enter a three-game series at Rogers Centre with the exact same record. Angels manager Mike Scioscia, asked of any similarities between the two teams, said …

“I can only speak from our angle. I don’t want to dissect their team. But I can tell you that no matter what a perceived strength is of a club — and you can talk about payrolls all you want — you’re only going to be as good as your pitching staff is going to allow you. And I think it’s proved its point in the last three weeks, as you guys have seen our team on a daily basis. When we get those starters giving us a chance to win, we’ve set up games the way we’ve needed and we’ve held leads. And that was an issue for long stretches of the season and we paid a price for it. I think it still comes down to the depth and the strength of your pitching staff moving forward. And ours just hasn’t held up the way that we needed to.”

Indeed, the Angels entered Tuesday 28th in the Majors in pitching ERA (4.29). The Blue Jays are 26th (4.26).

Lineups …

Angels (67-76)

ANACollin Cowgill, CF
Erick Aybar, SS
Mike Trout, DH
Mark Trumbo, 1B
Josh Hamilton, LF
Chris Iannetta, C
Kole Calhoun, RF
Grant Green, 2B
Andrew Romine, 3B

Pitching: RH Jerome Williams (6-10, 4.60 ERA)

Blue Jays (67-76)

TORJose Reyes, SS
Ryan Goins, 2B
Brett Lawrie, 3B
Adam Lind, 1B
Rajai Davis, LF
J.P. Arencibia, C
Moises Sierra, RF
Anthony Gose, CF
Kevin Pillar, DH

Pitching: LH Mark Buehrle (11-7, 3.88 ERA)

  • Howie Kendrick was activated for today’s game, but isn’t expected to start at second base until Friday’s series opener in Houston. The Angels want to avoid bringing him back on the turf. Kendrick did some more running in the early afternoon today and feels the left knee is finally 100 percent.
  • Jered Weaver felt some tightness in his right forearm during his start in steamy Minnesota on Monday, but he’s expected to take his next turn through the rotation.
  • Luis Jimenez is still not available. More of an issue right now are his shoulders, which got banged up in a home-plate collision with A.J. Pierzynski on Saturday.
  • Peter Bourjos had successful surgery on his right wrist today. Recovery time is eight weeks.
  • In case you missed it, here’s a story on the Angels’ 2014 schedule.

Alden

Game 29: Orioles-Angels …

Orioles (17-12)

BALNolan Reimold, LF
Manny Machado, 3B
Nick Markakis, RF
Adam Jones, CF
Chris Davis, 1B
Matt Wieters, C
J.J. Hardy, SS
Steve Pearce, DH
Alexi Casilla, 2B

SP: RH Miguel Gonzalez (2-1, 4.60 ERA)

Angels (10-18)

laaErick Aybar, SS
Mike Trout, CF
Albert Pujols, 1B
Mark Trumbo, RF
Josh Hamilton, DH
Howie Kendrick, 2B
Alberto Callaspo, 3B
Chris Iannetta, C
J.B. Shuck, LF

SP: LH Jason Vargas (0-3, 4.85)

  • As you might have noticed, Callaspo was activated off the disabled prior to Friday’s game. But going down was Andrew Romine, not Luis Jimenez. Mike Scioscia likes having a power right-handed bat off the bench like Jimenez — it’s essentially the role Bill Hall was going to play, before he got hurt in Spring Training — and he feels Brendan Harris can be used as a utility infielder. A big question with this decision, however, is Harris’ defense. It’s not his strong suit. Offense is. Romine was a much more capable defender. And maybe Jimenez would’ve benefited from some more at-bats in the Minors to polish up his approach, which has led to a lot of strikeouts at this level.
  • In tune with his new role, Jimenez was getting some work in left field pregame. Scioscia said right now he’s only comfortable using Jimenez there in an “emergency” situation, but perhaps that can change if he gets better at it.
  • Garrett Richards is going back to the bullpen, with Jerome Williams taking his spot in the rotation on Sunday. The move makes sense on a couple of fronts. First and foremost, the Angels need a relief pitcher to bridge the gap to the later innings, and Richards can do that in what he said is “a primary role” in the back end. Williams has struggled as a starting pitcher in recent outings, but he’s been really good in long relief lately.
  • Sean Burnett said today that he’s going to fly to Florida to see Dr. James Andrews on Monday morning. After that, he’ll fly to Houston to rejoin the team on their two-city trip. The lefty reliever, out since April 27 with left forearm irritation, didn’t sound very concerned. But it’s always frightening when pitchers see Dr. Andrews, so it’s definitely something worth monitoring.
  • It looks like Scott Downs (pain in his right side) will avoid the DL. At least for now. He probably won’t be available Friday, but Scioscia is going to have him go through his normal pregame nonetheless.
  • Mark Lowe (left neck strain) will pitch two innings for Class A Inland Empire on Sunday. He’s eligible to be activated that day, so that may be Lowe’s final outing before rejoining the team.
  • Shortstop Tommy Field suffered a broken finger shortly after he was sent down on April 23. He’s on the 7-day Minor League DL and could miss a month.

Alden

Minutiae from a wild, 19-inning night …

APTOPIX Angels Athletics BaseballSome additional tidbits from Monday night’s 19-inning, 10-8 loss to the A’s, courtesy of the Angels’ PR department …

  • At six hours and 32 minutes, it was the longest game in Angels history, surpassing the six-hour, six-minute game played on April 13, 1982 against the Mariners (20 innings).
  • Innings-wise, it was the third-longest in Angels history. The Angels have played 20 innings twice, on the above-mentioned game against Seattle and July 9, 1971, against the A’s. That means two of the three 19-inning games in Angels history have been walk-off losses to the A’s.
  • It was the longest MLB game since the Pirates beat the Cardinals, 6-3, in 19 innings on Aug. 19, 2012, in St. Louis; it was the longest AL game since the White Sox beat the Red Sox, 6-5, in 19 innings on July 9, 2006, in Chicago.
  • The 18 runs scored were the fourth-most in 19-inning, Major League history.
  • The two clubs used a combined 16 pitches (eight each) and threw a combined 597 pitches. The 297 pitches the Angels threw were the most since at least 1988.
  • Howie Kendrick and Brendan Harris each went 2-for-9, becoming the second and third Angels players to log nine at-bats in a game. The first was Don Baylor, who went 5-for-9 on 4/13/82. It was the first game since 1993 to have three players (also Jed Lowrie) log nine at-bats in a game.
  • Six different Angels pitchers allowed a run for the fifth time in team history, and first time since Sept. 30, 2000.
  • Four players (Peter Bourjos, Luis Jimenez, Coco Crisp, Chris Young) exited early with injuries.
  • Seven of the Angels’ nine position players went the full 19 innings, including catcher Chris Iannetta, who worked 18 2/3 innings behind the plate. The last American League catchers to be behind the plate for more than 18 innings in a game were A.J. Pierzynski and Jason Varitek in 2006, in a game between the White Sox and Red Sox that ended with one out in the bottom of the 19th.

Alden

Game 26: Angels-Athletics …

The Angels’ 19-inning loss last night was a devastating one, but it was also quite memorable. It was the longest game in Angels history — A’s, too — and it witnessed several encouraging performances. Tommy Hanson pitched six innings of two-run ball with a heavy heart, Chris Iannetta squatted for 19 innings behind the plate, Mark Trumbo hit a 475-foot homer that was tied for the longest in the Majors this season, Albert Pujols had four hits, went deep twice and played the field despite having plantar fasciitis on his left foot, and Jerome Williams hurled six innings of one-run ball in relief.

Still, though, the Angels were in no mood to reminisce on Tuesday.

“I don’t feel any nostalgia towards it,” Trumbo said. “It’s all about winning, and we didn’t do it.”

Angels (9-16)

CALErick Aybar, SS
Mike Trout, CF
Pujols, DH
Trumbo, 1B
Josh Hamilton, RF
Howie Kendrick, 2B
Hank Conger, C
Brendan Harris, 3B
J.B. Shuck, LF

SP: RH Garrett Richards (1-1, 3.65 ERA)

Athletics (15-12)

OAKJohn Jaso, DH
Adam Rosales, SS
Seth Smith, LF
Yoenis Cespedes, CF
Brandon Moss, 1B
Josh Donaldson, 3B
Josh Reddick, RF
Derek Norris, C
Eric Sogard, 2B

SP: RH Jarrod Parker (0-4, 8.10 ERA)

  • The Angels officially placed Peter Bourjos on the disabled list today with a strained left hamstring, activating Aybar. Also, outfielder Scott Cousins had his contract purchased from Triple-A Salt Lake and Michael Roth was sent down. The Angels’ 40-man roster is back at 40, and the Angels are back to the traditional seven relievers and four-man bench — despite the fact seven relievers accounted for 12 2/3 innings the night before. “Really, we’re as banged up on the lineup side,” Mike Scioscia said.
  • It looks like only Jerome Williams and Michael Kohn will be unavailable tonight. Ernesto Frieri is good to go, as are Barry Enright, Dane De La Rosa, Nick Maronde and Scott Downs.
  • Luis Jimenez‘s bruised left shin is “a little tight,” Scioscia said, but he may be available to play defense. If the Angels get a lead late, don’t be surprised to see him sub in for Harris at third.
  • Still no time frame on how long Bourjos’ hamstring will keep him out. Obviously, as a speed guy, he needs that to be 100 percent before returning.
  • Ryan Madson is still not throwing.
  • Jimenez has some experience in the outfield from winter ball, so that may be an option for him once Alberto Callaspo returns.

Alden

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