Results tagged ‘ Howie Kendrick ’

Baylor could be back with team by April 28 …

Don BaylorAngels hitting coach Don Baylor is currently in physical therapy and manager Mike Scioscia is hopeful that he can rejoin the team when it returns from a three-city road trip, for the April 28 series opener against the Indians.

It’ll still be a while before Baylor can be in the dugout during games, and even longer before he can travel with the team. But Baylor, who suffered a fractured right femur while catching the ceremonial first pitch thrown by Vladimir Guerrero on Opening Day, can at least work with hitters and attend pregame hitters before home games in about 13 days.

“Don’s a tough guy,” Scioscia said. “He’s anxious to get back. We’ve texted a lot. He’s in touch with [hitting coaches] Dave [Hansen] and Paul [Sorrento] on a daily basis. He’s still keeping tabs on everything that’s going on.”

Baylor was discharged from UCI Medical Center on April 4, three days post-op. Based on his initial prognosis, the 64-year-old is still at least three weeks away from being able to put weight on his right side, so he’d probably be getting around on a walker upon returning to Angel Stadium.

Scioscia said he doesn’t “anticipate Don back in full force for a while.”

“Even being here and being in the dugout, getting involved; I’m not sure when that’s going to be.”

Some other pregame notes from Jackie Robinson Day …

  • Scioscia did not back off from his statements (and Howie Kendrick‘s) from Monday night regarding the bang-bang play at first base in the ninth inning: “We said it last night and we looked at it again yesterday. I don’t know what angle they were looking at, but the way it’s explained to us is the ball has to hit the back of a fielder’s mitt before you stop the play to see where the runner’s foot is. And Howie’s foot is clearly on the bag before that ball hits the back of [Daric] Barton’s mitt.
  • Asked if he believes David Freese, dropped to seventh after striking out twice in each of his last two games, is putting added pressure on himself, Scioscia said: “We’ve had those conversations with David and we monitored them very quickly. He’s very calm on the baseball field and I think he understands that he can play better than he did last year. Coming to a new team, there might be an element of that. But I think he’s very comfortable with the teammates, he’s very comfortable with what his role was on the club, and hopefully he’ll start to hit stride and get the big hits that he’s capable of getting.”
  • It appears, though it’s unofficial yet, that Dane De La Rosa was reaclled from Triple-A Salt Lake so that he could be placed on the 15-day disabled list. Scioscia said the injury “is not significant” and that De La Rosa will continue in his throwing program. … Sean Burnett is playing catch again today and is expected to go to Arizona to throw off a mound in a few days. … And yes, Ernesto Frieri is still the closer.

Athletics (9-4)

John Jaso, C
Jed Lowrie, SS
Josh Donaldson, 3B
Brandon Moss, 1B
Yoenis Cespedes, LF
Alberto Callaspo, DH
Josh Reddick, RF
Craig Gentry, CF
Eric Sogard, 2B

SP: RH Dan Straily (1-1, 2.77 ERA)

Angels (6-7)

Kole Calhoun, RF
Mike Trout, CF
Albert Pujols, 1B
Raul Ibanez, DH
Howie Kendrick, 2B
J.B. Shuck, LF
David Freese, 3B
Chris Iannetta, C
Erick Aybar, SS

SP: RH Garrett Richards (2-0, 0.75 ERA)

Alden

ST Game 28: Angels 8, Cubs 4 …

Brandon LyonMost important thing: It actually took place in the backfields of the Angels’ Tempe Diablo Stadium complex, where Jered Weaver made his last start of the spring and was lights out against the Brewers’ Triple-A team, pitching seven shutout innings, giving up four hits, walking one and striking out eight in a 102-pitch outing. He’ll start Opening Day on five days’ rest.

Second-most important thing: Three outs away from snapping a six-game winning streak, the Angels plated six runs in the ninth inning, getting a leadoff homer from Ian Stewart, an RBI double by Collin Cowgill, an RBI single from Shawn O’Malley, a two-run single by Abel Baker and an RBI single from Stewart when he came up again.

Third-most important thing: Weaver’s start in a controlled environment made Tuesday a bullpen game. Brandon Lyon gave up a couple of runs while recording only one run in his second inning of work; Ernesto Frieri pitched his eighth straight scoreless inning of the spring; Fernando Salas had a clean inning to put his spring ERA at 3.00; and Michael Kohn gave up a run on two hits and a walk to put his spring ERA at 7.00.

Fourth-most important thing: All the everyday players except Howie Kendrick (stomach virus) and David Freese (tight quad) got a couple of plate appearances. Albert Pujols had a sac fly, Josh Hamilton walked and hit a double that almost left the ballpark, Raul Ibanez hit a solo homer and Mike Trout went 1-for-2 to finish Cactus League play with a .412 batting average.

Fifth-most important thing: Grant Green went 2-for-4 with a double and a triple to put his batting average at .362. John McDonald is officially the Angels’ utility infielder now, and it’s unlikely that Green makes the team. But he’s had a very nice spring at the plate and is getting better at shortstop.

Best defensive play (that I actually saw): Speaking of Green, he made a nice diving stop in the first inning while playing second base.

Best quote: Mike Scioscia on Freese being a late scratch: “He was ready to play. It was not even anything that would hamper him from taking ground balls. But the medical staff thought it would be prudent to have him take today off and tomorrow so he’ll be ready to play. It’s not even a concern.”

Angels’ record: 16-10-2

Alden

ST Game 27: Angels 11, Giants 4 …

Josh Hamilton, Hector SanchezMost important thing: Josh Hamilton hit two doubles, running really well on each of them, and scored a run. He’s clearly healthy, his timing looks to be back, and he’s batting .391. He looks ready.

Second-most important thing: Tyler Skaggs pitched around seven hits and three walks to give up only two runs (one earned) in 5 1/3 innings. His stuff looked much better than it did five days ago, when he gave up five runs in 4 1/3 innings against the White Sox.

Third-most important thing: The Angels have won six games in a row. I know Spring Training records mean next to nothing, but every starter looks on track, their key relievers have pitched well and the offense looks very good. Let’s see how it translates into the regular season.

Fourth-most important thing: One guy who hasn’t been clicking much is Raul Ibanez, but he got an RBI single and hit two balls hard on Monday. A good sign for someone who entered with only eight hits in 42 at-bats.

Fifth-most important thing: It’s getting close to decision time, and Grant Green (2-for-3 with a double and three RBIs, putting his batting average at .349) and J.B. Shuck (2-for-2 with a double and two RBIs, now batting at a .283 clip) had strong games.

Best defensive play (that I actually saw): Two good plays, actually — one to Skaggs for avoiding a broken bat that was flying at his face in the first, one for Howie Kendrick for diving up the middle to get a force out on a Michael Morse grounder.

Best quote: Mike Scioscia on the Angels’ winning streak: “We’re doing a lot of things that we’re going to need to do to win ballgames during the season. We’re playing defense, our pitching has been really, really strong all spring, and on the offensive side you can see the potential depth of our lineup when you have a guy like Howie hitting sixth or seventh. There’s some good things that we’ve been doing the last couple weeks and we just need to keep going these last few days; keep pushing and get ready for Opening Day.”

Angels’ record: 15-10-2

Alden

ST Game 22: Angels 14, White Sox 10 …

Mike TroutMost important thing: The Angels unveiled their everyday lineup on Wednesday, and it did some serious damage. In the six innings the starting nine was together, they plated nine runs and scored in every frame. Albert Pujols lined two doubles to right-center field, Mike Trout hit a solo homer to left-center, Kole Calhoun and Howie Kendrick each notched a couple of hits, Josh Hamilton and David Freese contributed RBI singles, and Erick Aybar brought in a run with a suicide squeeze.

Second-most important thing: Tyler Skaggs struggled once again, despite being given a big lead. The 22-year-old left-hander gave up five runs on seven hits and three walks, striking out two in 4 1/3 innings. Skaggs has now given up 11 runs in his last 11 1/3 innings, putting his Cactus League ERA at 6.14. Two starts remain.

Third-most important thing: Michael Kohn walked the first two batters he faced in the seventh, then gave up an RBI single to Jose Abreu before recording back-to-back outs and exiting. Cory Rasmus immediately gave up a three-run homer to Matt Davidson, charging two more runs to Kohn and making his 8.53 spring ERA deceiving. Mike Scioscia said that while the ball is coming out of Kohn’s hand well, he’s “yanking” the ball, which means he’s flying open with his left shoulder and it’s causing him to miss outside on right-handers.

Fourth-most important thing: Trout took a first-pitch curveball from right-hander Erik Johnson to the left wrist, then stole second base two pitchers later.  On Saturday, Trout was hit in the back and stole second base on the next pitch. He loves doing that.

Fifth-most important thing: Some bench hopefuls did some good things. J.B. Shuck hit his fourth triple of the spring, Ian Stewart hit a long home run and Grant Green handled two grounders at shortstop, one of which was a slow roller.

Best defensive play (that I actually saw): With two on and two outs in the fifth, Calhoun crashed up against the right-field fence to catch a long line drive off the bat of Dayan Viciedo.

Best quote: Skaggs on his outing: “The command was definitely not what I wanted it to be. I made some good pitches in tough times, but one that you definitely build off as a learning experience today, kind of not going out there and having the command of any of my pitches.”

Angels’ record: 10-10-2

Alden

ST Game 16: Angels 8, White Sox 6 …

Most important thing: The Angels came out of the gate hot again, scoring seven runs in the first two innings. In the first five innings of their last three games — including both games on Wednesday — they’ve scored a combined 26 runs.

Second-most important thing: Michael Kohn, who still has to earn a spot in the bullpen, gave up three runs and couldn’t finish the eighth inning. Kohn gave up a triple and a walk, allowed a run to score on a strikeout-wild pitch, then served up a two-run homer.

Third-most important thing: Garrett Richards fought himself for most of the afternoon, giving up seven hits and hitting a batter, but he only gave up two runs and he didn’t walk a batter (he hasn’t walked one all spring).

Fourth-most important thing: Several of the regulars had solid days. Mike Trout went 3-for-3 with a triple and is batting .444. Howie Kendrick went 2-for-3 to put his batting average at .435. Kole Calhoun hit a two-run triple. And Erick Aybar smoked an RBI double. Raul Ibanez smoked two line drives. And David Freese notched a hard-hit RBI single.

Best defensive play (that I actually saw): With two outs in the sixth, Pujols — playing first base for the third straight day, went a long way in foul territory and made a nice over-the-shoulder catch near the fence.

Best quote: Mike Scioscia, on the offense: “We talked about the opening day of spring when we killed the ball, and then we were talking about seven, eight, nine games trying to get things together. But these guys are starting to hit stride. They’re getting into their 20, 30 at-bats, and there’s no doubt they’re putting some things together.”

Alden

De La Rosa diagnosed with a forearm strain …

Dane De La Rosa, Scott Van SlykeDane De La Rosa‘s forearm injury, which caused a rough outing against the Dodgers on Thursday and prompted him to leave the game early, was diagnosed as a sprain, an MRI confirmed, and the Angels’ power reliever doesn’t believe he’ll start the season on the disabled list.

“I doubt  it,” a relieved De La Rosa said Friday morning, while hooked up to an electronic muscle massager.

“I should be fine. I’m not sure about the timeline, I can’t really say, but it won’t be too long.”

Starting the sixth inning from Tempe Diablo Stadium, De La Rosa — the journeyman 31-year-old coming off a breakout season in 2013 — allowed five of the seven batters he faced to reach and served up a grand slam to Scott Van Slyke. With two outs in the inning, he was checked on by the Angels’ medical staff and removed from the game.

“I just didn’t feel the ball,” De La Rosa said. “There were a few times when I just had no idea where it was going. I just couldn’t feel fingertips. If you can’t feel your fingertips when you’re pitching, it’s not a good thing.”

De La Rosa said he and the Angels will “attack [rehab] pretty aggressively,” but he didn’t have a gauge on a timeline because he hasn’t visited with the team’s medical staff yet. Angels manager Mike Scioscia said a return by Opening Day, on March 31, is “still realistic because he’s a bullpen guy, but we’ll cross that bridge when we get to it.”

De La Rosa earned the nickname “Everyday Dane” last season for the frequency of his usage. He pitched in 75 games, fifth-most in the American League, while posting a 2.86 ERA and emerging as the team’s setup man down the stretch.

Asked if all those appearances have caught up with De La Rosa, Scioscia said: “I mean, his bullpens have been great. He didn’t show any signs of anything last year. But I don’t know if you ever really know.”

  • C.J. Wilson on Dr. Frank Jobe, who passed away on Thursday: “The pitcher’s elbow is like Humpty Dumpty, and he figured out how to put it back together again.” The Angels left-hander, like many, believes guys like Dr. Jobe and Dr. Lewis Yocum, who passed away last year, should be enshrined in Cooperstown.
  • The Angels will meet with Major League Baseball at some point in the next week, where they’ll look at video of Thursday’s play at home plate. Scioscia said the meeting was pre-planned and not a reaction to yesterday’s play. Mike Trout was looking at pictures of his slide on his phone in the clubhouse and said he’s still confused about Rule 7.13 on home-plate collisions. Many are. “Guess I have to do my homework,” he said.
  • Former Chicago Bears linebacker Brian Urlacher is in full uniform today and was chatting up with Trout during warmups. He’ll shag fly balls and take batting practice. Albert Pujols has played golf with him several times and, not surprisingly, says he can drive the ball a long, long way.
  • Catcher John Hester is fine after taking a fastball to his left wrist in the ninth inning of Thursday’s game. He didn’t require X-rays and may even play against the Rockies today.
  • Today is the Angels’ first split-squad game of the spring. Triple-A manager Keith Johnson will focus on the offense, player information coach Rick Eckstein will handle the defense and Erik Bennett will be the pitching coach.
  • Some notes for the game against the Cubs in Tempe today: Kole Calhoun has led off in six of the Angels’ seven Cactus League games, so, yes, he’ll be the leadoff hitter this year. “You kind of get caught in the middle, I guess, because I do like to be aggressive but right now you kind of have to take a step back and see some more pitches,” Calhoun said. … Trout, Pujols, David Freese, Howie Kendrick, J.B. Shuck, Hank Conger and Erick Aybar are also in that lineup, with Hector Santiago starting.
  • Some notes for the game against the Rockies at Salt River Fields: Grant Green will get his first spring start at third base. … Bench competitors Andrew Romine (shortstop), Ian Stewart (first base), Collin Cowgill (center field) and Brennan Boesch (left field) are also in the lineup, with Joe Blanton starting.

Alden

ST Game 1: Angels 15, Cubs 3 …

Mike TroutMost important thing: The Angels were dialed in. Yes, it’s only Spring Training, and it came against a bad Cubs team that was basically only playing with three regulars, but it’s important for the Angels to assert themselves early in hopes of avoiding another season-crippling start. And their offensive showing, after doing live batting practice for about a week week, was uplifting. Mike Trout hit a grand slam, Chris Iannetta fell three feet shy of a two-homer day, J.B. Shuck had a three-run triple and the Angels had two crooked-number innings, scoring four in the second and nine — nine! — in the fourth.

Second-most important thing: Jered Weaver looked good. He went three full innings in a Cactus League opener for the first time in his career and gave up only one hard-hit ball. Weaver threw 41 pitches and sat around 87 mph. That’s basically where he was last year, and he should build up from that as he continues to throw. His changeup looked great, and he felt like he could’ve kept pitching after three one-hit innings.

Third-most important thing: Maybe not important, but fun — Trout’s grand slam was a laser beam. He got a 2-0 fastball low and inside, kept his hands in beautifully and drove it over the picnic area in left field. In case you hadn’t noticed, he good.

Fourth-most important thing: All the everyday position players (except Josh Hamilton, who’s nursing a strained left calf) played five innings on defense. That included Albert Pujols (0-for-2 with a strikeout and a walk), who didn’t have any balls hit to him but was moving around well in pre-game infield.

Fifth-most important thing: Howie Kendrick singled in his first at-bat and has now hit safely in 27 of his last 29 Spring Training games. His Cactus League batting averages from 2007-13, respectively: .348, .382, .339, .313, .364, .383, .435.

Best defensive play (that I actually saw): A tie between Andrew Romine and John McDonald, the two guys fighting to secure the utility infield spot. In the eighth, McDonald — playing second base — slid to his right to backhand a sharp Dan Vogelbach grounder and then made a nifty glove-flip to Romine in one motion, starting a 4-6-3 double play. In the ninth, Romine — playing shortstop — ranged deep in the hole to backhand an Albert Almora grounder and made a long, loopy throw to first to record the out just in time.

Best quote: Mike Scioscia, when sheepishly asked if he felt Trout’s ball had a chance to go out: “I think it was out before he got out of the batter’s box.”

Taco power rankings (updated every Friday): 1. Los Taquitos, 2. Sombrero’s Mexican Grill, 3. Fuzzy’s Taco Shop, 4. Carolina’s Mexican Food, 5. Poliberto’s Taco Shop

Alden

Dipoto, from Day 1 of the Winter Meetings …

DipotoAs reporters waited in the hallway for their scheduled session with Jerry Dipoto, the Angels’ general manager walked towards his suite while chatting with D-backs GM Kevin Towers. “Just friends talking,” Dipoto said. Maybe. But the D-backs are one team that could be interested in someone like Mark Trumbo, and may have some cost-controlled starting pitching they’re willing to give up (more on Trumbo’s potential availability in a trade here).

In any case, Dipoto said he doesn’t expect the Angels to make any moves on Monday, Day 1 of the Winter Meetings from the Walt Disney World Swan & Dolphin Resort. But he did get the sense that more teams appear willing to access pitching via the trade market, rather than a free-agent market that has seen prices skyrocket.

Here are the highlights from Dipoto’s session with the media (with outstanding camera work provided by the iPhone of Angels PR man Eric Kay) …

On the most likely scenario to address the two holes in the rotation — free agency, trades or both …

I’m not really a prognosticator in that way. Any of them are all still possibilities. We’re open to the trade market, we’re open to free agency, we’re open to any combination of the two. Like I’ve said throughout, especially these last couple of weeks, we know what our needs are, they’re pretty clearly defined, and we’re going to go out and fill them the best we can.

On whether the Angels are a match with the D-backs …

Still trying to figure it out, like with a lot of teams.

On whether not signing a top-tier starter can impact who is available via trade …

Everything you do in a roster, all 25 players, work hand-in-hand. Often times one will define the next move, or what kind of flexibility you have available to make the next move. But in this particular case, as I’ve said throughout, we’re not particularly excited about the idea of losing our first-round Draft [pick]. That’s not Plan A. We’re going out, we’re looking at the rest of the market, we’ve not closed the door on any candidates specifically, we’re open-minded to how we’re going to fill our needs. And if that comes in some combination of trade or free agency, then that’s what we expect.

On whether he’d be willing to part ways with prospects …

If it makes sense in doing a deal, sure. With Major League players, with prospects in the system, you have to go in open-minded and see where it leads you. Obviously we’re not looking to unload our Minor League system to achieve anything in the big leagues, but you have to be open-minded to all the different ways you can access what you’re looking for. In this case, we know what we’re looking for – we’re looking for starting pitching, and however we get there, we’re going to learn a lot about that in these next couple of days.

On whether it’s easier when your needs are so clearly defined (starting pitching) …

We really do have a short shopping list, but that can change. As we’ve all talked about before, every move opens up a whole new avenue. Your roster looks one way today, it can look another way tomorrow. The same is true of 29 other teams. We’re trying to stay in tune with what’s happening in the market, even outside of what our specific shopping needs are, and be abreast of where it goes should our dynamic change, because it’s possible it could.

On if teams and free agents are generally waiting for Masahiro Tanaka to be posted/sign …

Not really. Just the conversations we’ve had today with other teams, it’s business as usual. I don’t think there’s any one person or event holding up the market.

On whether he has a sense he can get something done during the Winter Meetings …

Not yet. We haven’t been here 24 hours yet. But the way the Winter Meetings are now, you do so much prep work before you get here, dating back to well before the GM Meetings – conversations with teams, the discussions of what may or may not be out there trade-wise. Free agency has been open for quite some time now. We’ve had at least some exchange in rhetoric with free agent groups on their desires, what they’re looking for, both in contract and term for their player, and then the fit – the city, the team, the ballpark, etc.

On if teams still view the Angels as a ‘championship contender’ …

For the players out there, they know they’re getting into a competitive situation. This is the same team that won 89 games the year before last, and like I said, the talent that you can roll out there on paper, that just so happened to not be out there all the time in performance last year, whether it be due to injury, struggle, what-have-you, there’s still players that are respected with what they do presently, what they have done in their careers, and we are I think a very attractive destination for free agents as a result.

On if it’s safe to say Trumbo has been the most-inquired-about player …

We’ve been hit a fair amount on a number of our players, and particularly Mark. Mark’s been a popular name, Howie [Kendrick has] been a popular name, and there have been others. We’ve been asked in context about most of the players on our roster, which is not uncommon. It’s very similar for a lot of other teams. But I would say there’s been fairly heavy traffic on guys like Mark specifically.

On a potential Mike Trout extension …

It’s something we’re definitely aware of, I know it’s something Mike’s aware of, but it’s nothing that we’ll talk about publicly. Those are private conversations that we’ll have with Mike and his people at the appropriate time.

Alden

Angels’ competition getting tougher …

Robinson CanoThe American League West didn’t necessarily, well, impress last year.

Here’s how it stacked up in combined wins …

AL East: 433
NL Central: 421
AL Central: 400
NL West: 399
NL East: 391
AL West: 387

And here’s where it ranked in run-differential …

AL East: 235
NL Central: 219
AL Central: 0
NL West: -137
AL West: -138
NL East: -179

But AL West teams have been particularly aggressive in the early portion of this offseason — and yes, it’s worth reminding all of you that it is, indeed, still early — which could make for an interesting dynamic in 2014, and should make the Angels’ return to the postseason that much tougher.

The Mariners just reeled in the biggest free agent of the offseason, snatching Robinson Cano from the Yankees via a reported 10-year, $240-million, Albert Pujols-like contract. No, they aren’t an instant contender. And as the Angels themselves have shown, throwing the most dollars at the best free agent in no way guarantees success. But this is an important building block for a Mariners team that has always struggled to land the big names (see: Josh Hamilton and Prince Fielder). At some point, you have to overpay to lay a foundation (the Mets thought the same thing with Curtis Granderson). This reminds me of the Jayson Werth deal the Nationals made three offseasons ago. It was a vast overpay at seven years and $126 million. But at that time, it was the only way the Nats were going to land a premier free agent. Adding Werth — even if he isn’t a star to the magnitude of Cano —  changed the expectations in Washington and ultimately helped make it a place where free agents wanted to play. Same can happen in Seattle, where the Mariners are showing a willingness to spend. And if they trade for David Price — they have the prospects to do it — watch out.

In the words of one executive, “The A’s may have one of the best bullpens in history.” It’s not much of an exaggeration when you consider that they added Luke Gregerson to a group that includes Jim Johnson, Ryan Cook, Jerry Blevins, Sean Doolittle, etc. Their rotation — Jarrod Parker, A.J. Griffin, Scott Kazmir, Dan Straily, Sonny Gray, in whatever order — is darn good, as well. But here’s the most important part about the current A’s: After back-to-back exits in the Division Series, they’re going for it. You don’t trade for one season of Johnson, flip a talented prospect (Michael Choice) for Craig Gentry or give  Kazmir a two-year, $22 million contract if you aren’t.

Then there are the Rangers, who you just know have another big more or two in them. I actually liked the Fielder-for-Ian Kinsler deal for them (and loved it for the Tigers). They’re  paying Fielder $138 million over the next seven years, which is very reasonable for a guy whose home-run rate will inflate in Texas and who gives them the middle-of-the-order bat they’ve been missing since Hamilton left. Over the last four years, the Rangers have the third-best regular-season winning percentage in the Majors (.570, trailing only the Yankees and Braves) and have been to the World Series twice. They had the 10th-best staff ERA in baseball last year, and they surely aren’t done.

Even the Astros have made some moves. They reached agreement on a three-year, $30 million deal with starter Scott Feldman — a guy the Angels would’ve liked, but not for three years — and previously traded for former Rockies center fielder Dexter Fowler. They were easily dead last in 2013 in winning percentage (.315) and run-differential (minus-238), so they’re a ways away. But they have the second-best farm system in the Majors, per Baseball America, and they’re on their way.

What does all this mean for the Angels?

Well, nothing. At least not now.

They have about $15 million and some trade chips — Howie Kendrick still chief among them — to fill two spots in their starting rotation. They still have baseball’s best player in Mike Trout, two premier superstars in Pujols and Hamilton, two legit starters at the top of their rotation in Jered Weaver and C.J. Wilson, and a bullpen that can be among the deepest in baseball if Sean Burnett returns to full health. If they can sign someone like Matt Garza, they’re no doubt a legit playoff contender, regardless of how bad this past season turned out for them.

But their competition just keeps getting better.

Alden

How much is left for starting pitching? …

The Angels’ budget got a little clearer on Monday, upon announcing they were non-tendering Jerome Williams, Tommy Hanson, Chris Nelson and Juan Gutierrez. That clears about $10 million in projected salary, crucial to an Angels team that needs to add at least two starting pitchers while staying below the luxury-tax threshold of $189 million.

So, how much room do they have left on the budget?

Let’s have a look …

The Collective Balance Tax Payroll is the average annual value of all 40-man-roster contracts, plus benefits, pensions, bonuses, etc. First, let’s add up the AAV of the 10 players on the budget …

Josh Hamilton: $25M
Albert Pujols: $24M
Jered Weaver: $17M
C.J. Wilson: $15.5M
Erick Aybar: $8.75M
Howie Kendrick: $8.375M
Joe Blanton: $7.5M
Joe Smith: $5.25M
Chris Iannetta: $5.18M
Sean Burnett: $4M

That equals $120.56 million. Then you have to add the $18.6 million the Angels owe the Yankees for the final season of Vernon Wells’ contract, which puts the total at $139.16. Then you have to project ahead for arbitration. Below are the Angels’ five remaining arbitration-eligible players, with the projections provided by MLBTradeRumors.com …

Mark Trumbo: $4.7M
David Freese: $4.4M
Ernesto Frieri: $3.4M
Kevin Jepsen: $1.4M
Fernando Salas: $700K

That’s $14.6 million, and it puts the CBT payroll at $153.76 million.

The last part is when it gets really uncertain with more than four months left before Opening Day (keep in mind: a team’s final CBT payroll isn’t calculated until after the season). To that figure, you have to tack on all the contracts for players with zero to three years of service time (the Major League minimum in 2014 is $500,000) plus benefits. I’m told the best way to go about it is to just allocate $20 million for all of this.

That puts the Angels’ CBT payroll at roughly $174 million, which gives them about $15 million of wiggle-room before hitting the luxury tax.

That figure is nowhere near exact, but as close as you can get at this point.

Alden

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