Results tagged ‘ Ernesto Frieri ’

Angels swap Ernesto Frieri for Jason Grilli …

Jason GrilliThe Angels took a step – and it’s probably only the first step – in trying to shore up the back end of their bullpen on Friday, sending struggling closer Ernesto Frieri to the Pirates for struggling closer Jason Grilli in what general manager Jerry Dipoto called “a classic change of scenery that I think will be good for all parties.”

Grilli, 37, posted a 2.74 ERA and saved 36 games for the Pirates from 2011-13, but has hit a rough patch this year, posting a 4.87 ERA, a 1.62 WHIP and a 1.91 strikeout-to-walk ratio while saving 11 games in 15 opportunities.

Frieri, 28, had a 3.07 ERA and 60 saves from 2012-13, but has struggled through a 6.39 ERA, a 1.36 WHIP and a 4.22 strikeout-to-walk ratio in 2014, which has seen him blow three of his 14 save chances.

Frieri is owed $3.8 million in 2014 and was arbitration-eligible for two more seasons, while Grilli is owed $4 million and is a free agent at the end of the year.

“At the end of the day, sometimes these types of address changes are just good for everybody,” Dipoto said in a phone interview. “Obviously, over the last couple weeks, it’s been a mighty struggle for Ernie. And he just needed a chance to clear himself out. This is probably best in that regard.

“We’re encouraged to get the opportunity to work with Jason Grilli, and see if we can’t get him back to where he needs to be. He still has the velocity, he still has the slider, he still has the ability to be the dominant ninth-inning presence that he was a year ago.”

But will he be the closer, like he was during that All-Star season in 2013?

“We’ll sort that through as he gets in,” Dipoto said of Grilli, who’s expected to join the Angels in time for Saturday’s game against the Royals.

“We’ll see where he fits in,” Angels manager Mike Scioscia added. “He’s pitched in the back end of games and has done a very good job in that role. We’re going to get his feet on the ground here, and then we’ll see where he fits.”

The Angels head into a weekend series at Kauffman Stadium on a six-game winning streak that has put them a season-best 11 games over .500. But they’ve suffered through 12 blown saves, tied with the Astros for the American League lead, and entered Friday ranked 26th in the Majors in ERA (4.46) and tied for 23rd in WHIP (1.38) from their bullpen.

Dipoto would still like to add a situational left-hander and perhaps another option for the ninth inning, which would free Scioscia up to use current closer Joe Smith in a more versatile role.

“We’re still open to improving and adding to our team in any way that will help us win,” Dipoto said. “We understand that the bullpen is something that needs to be addressed. I think this is a step in trying to address some of our needs down there, but I’d be surprised if it’s the only step.”

Grilli – a product of Tommy John surgery in 2002 – was originally taken with the fourth overall pick in the 1997 First-Year Player Draft but didn’t come into his own until spending the entire 2010 season recovering from a torn quadriceps muscle, when he joined the Pirates as a 35-year-old who had already spent time in five different organizations.

Grilli broke out in 2013, posting a 2.70 ERA and 33 saves while converting each of his first 25 opportunities.

His fastball velocity is basically the same this year – in the 92- to 93-mph range – but he missed 27 games because of an oblique strain earlier this season and has yet to see consistent results.

“He’s ready for a new challenge,” Pirates GM Neal Huntington said. “Jason has responded very well to a number of challenges in his life. He had a good run here, loves the city and the team, but he’s ready for a new challenge.”

The Angels believe the same can be said for Frieri, the affable right-hander who shined upon being acquired from the Padres in May 2012 but has been demoted twice from his role as closer this season.

“Ernie’s a tremendous young man,” Scioscia said. “He became part of our family. It’s tough to let go of a piece like that. Hopefully in the long run it’ll be better for Ernie to go there and get a fresh start.”

Alden

Shoemaker makes a statement …

Matt ShoemakerMatt Shoemaker certainly isn’t making the Angels’ forthcoming rotation decision an easy one, and that’s certainly a good thing for the organization.

In Tuesday’s 9-3 win, the 27-year-old right-hander got “real aggressive” and tossed a career-high eight innings, giving up only two runs, scattering five hits, walking one batter and striking out a career-high 10. He could’ve had a complete game, but the tarp came onto the field as he warmed up in the bottom of the ninth with 94 pitches, prompting an 11-minute rain delay that forced Mike Scioscia to use Ernesto Frieri (his only rested reliever).

“I was thinking if it’s a real quick one I have a chance to go back out there,” Shoemaker said. “A lot of times, it’s like a 20-, 30-minute delay, and once that happens, hopefully I get a chance to go back out there. It’s unfortunate, but I understand.”

Shoemaker will settle for the win, and continued success. In six starts since initially replacing Hector Santiago in the rotation, he’s 4-0 with a 3.41 ERA.

Asked what he feels like he’s shown the Angels since arriving from Triple-A, Shoemaker said: “That I can definitely compete at this level and be a good attribute to this team. Just keep taking that mental approach of being aggressive, and do whatever I can to help this team win.”

Tyler Skaggs could be activated early next week, at which point the Angels will seemingly have to make a decision between Santiago and Shoemaker. Santiago has stated his case, too, pitching six shutout innings against the A’s on June 10 and throwing five scoreless against the Braves on Sunday before getting hit around a bit in the sixth — and he’d probably have the upper-hand given how much the Angels were counting on him at the start of the year.

But Shoemaker has shown he deserves to stay in the big leagues, either as a starter or a swingman in the bullpen.

The latter, however, would cut into the Angels’ organizationally starting-pitching depth.

“You never try to think about that,” Shoemaker said of pending roster decisions. “Sometimes you might think about some of that. But you say, ‘OK, let’s not think about that. Let’s think about what we’ve got today.'”

Alden

Burnett ‘excited, anxious to get back out there’ …

Sean Burnett, Mike SciosciaAfter an injury-riddled season, a surgical procedure, a nine-month rehab and a frustrating setback, lefty reliever Sean Burnett finally returned to the Majors on Friday, primed to appear out of the Angels’ bullpen for the first time in nearly a year.

“It’s a special day for me,” Burnett said, “and a day I’ve been waiting for a long time. I’m excited, anxious to get back out there.”

Burnett – signed to a two-year, $8 million contract in December 2012 – appeared in only 13 games last season before finally succumbing to elbow surgery in August 2013, a procedure that saw Dr. James Andrews re-open the scar from Burnett’s Tommy John surgery in 2004 and clean up residual scar tissue.

Burnett rehabbed all winter, started throwing bullpen sessions in Spring Training, had a bad reaction to a synvisc shot – an injectable lubricant used to treat arthritis – in late March, took a couple steps back, then slowly worked his way into a rehab assignment with Double-A Arkansas, giving up three runs in his first appearance and then throwing five straight scoreless outings.

The 31-year-old’s fastball sat mostly between 88 and 90 mph, which is about where he needs it to be, and said “the biggest thing for me was the movement was there, the life was on the ball, and I was able to locate down in the zone and repeat it.”

To activate Burnett off the disabled list, the Angels optioned first baseman/outfielder Efren Navarro to Triple-A Salt Lake, going back to the standard 13 position players and 12 relievers. Angels manager Mike Scioscia called Burnett “one of those guys that you don’t realize what he brings until he’s not here.”

With Burnett – 2.76 ERA, 1.23 WHIP with the Nats from 2010-12 – the Angels finally have a proven lefty reliever in a division with several menacing left-handed bats, one Scioscia can pair with Joe Smith and Ernesto Frieri in the back end of the bullpen.

Scioscia would like to get Burnett a low-leverage inning to get him re-acclimated, but said “if that game situation finds him tonight, he’s going to be out there.”

“I’m there physically,” Burnett said. “It’s just now the anxiousness and the nerves of getting back out there and doing it again for the first time in a big league mound. The stuff’s there, and the action on the ball is where it needs to be. It’s just controlling my emotions those first couple times out and not letting the excitement get to be.”

Some additional notes prior to the opener of a three-game series against the Royals …

  • Josh Hamilton (2-for-4 in his rehab debut on Thursday) was a late scratch from the Triple-A Salt Lake lineup on Friday. Scioscia said he got jammed badly in the ninth inning, causing soreness in his surgically repaired left thumb, and didn’t feel good during batting practice. He’s expected to return to the lineup on Saturday. As for whether Hamilton can be back by Monday in Seattle, as the left fielder had hoped, Scioscia said, “We’ll take it one day at a time.” No need to rush him for that, though.
  • Mike Trout (tight left hamstring) is back in the lineup after missing Wednesday’s game and then benefitting from the Angels’ scheduled off day on Thursday. He’s feeling a lot better.
  • Third baseman Ian Stewart (left hand contusion) had a “great” workout earlier today and could go on a rehab assignment on Saturday, Scioscia said.

Royals (23-23)

Nori Aoki, RF
Alcides Escobar, SS
Eric Hosmer, 1B
Billy Butler, DH
Alex Gordon, LF
Danny Valencia, 3B
Lorenzo Cain, CF
Pedro Ciraco, 2B
Brett Hayes, C

SP: LH Danny Duffy (2-3, 1.42 ERA)

Angels (26-20)

Howie Kendrick, 2B
Mike Trout, CF
Albert Pujols, 1B
David Freese, 3B
C.J. Cron, DH
Chris Iannetta, C
Erick Aybar, SS
Grant Green, LF
Collin Cowgill, RF

SP: LH C.J. Wilson (5-3, 3.16 ERA)

Alden

Who’s got the ninth? It’s anybody’s guess …

Joe Smith, Hank CongerOn Friday and Tuesday, Joe Smith pitched the eighth inning and Ernesto Frieri handled the ninth because the better part of the lineup — 2-3-4 on Friday, 1-2-3 on Tuesday — was batting in the eighth. But on Wednesday afternoon, Mike Scioscia threw a monkey wrench into any theory that Smith would be pitching against the better part of any lineup, when he had Frieri face the top of the order in the eighth and saved Smith for what ended up being 4-5-6 — and could’ve easily been 7-8-9 — in the ninth.

Why, exactly?

The score — 4-3 on Tuesday, 3-0 on Wednesday — surely played a factor.

“With the game one run yesterday, we liked Joe’s sinker against the bigger guys,” Scioscia explained. “Also, give guys a different look. We had the leeway if Ernie made one mistake it wasn’t going to hurt you as it might have last night.”

This much is clear by this point: There’s no hard-and-fast rule for who will be used in a save situation on a given day, be it Smith or Frieri. It’ll depend on matchups, sure, and it seems like Scioscia still trusts Smith more than Frieri. But the score will play a factor, as will giving the same hitters different looks and, certainly, the state of each reliever.

Scioscia would eventually like to have one closer, and he’d ideally like it to be Frieri so that he can maximize Smith’s versatility, but this is officially a closer-by-committee situation.

“To me, it relates to my early days with Cleveland, when I pitched the fifth, sixth, seventh and never knew when I was gonna pitch,” Smith said. “I was ready to pitch the eighth [on Tuesday]. I thought the phone call was going to be for me.”

“I just want to pitch,” Frieri said. “Especially in a close game.”

Alden

Frieri back in the 9th — for one night, at least …

Ernesto FrieriErnesto Frieri pitched in a save situation against the Yankees on Monday night, his first since being demoted from the closer’s role after a nightmarish ninth inning in the nation’s capital on April 23.

But that doesn’t necessarily mean he’s the closer again.

Joe Smith was warming up in the bullpen to pitch the ninth, but then he started feeling sick, and then he, well, disgorged his lunch. So Frieri, who started to warm up as Jered Weaver got in trouble in the eighth, got up again, checked into the ninth with a three-run lead and notched a 1-2-3 inning — striking out Jacoby Ellsbury and Mark Teixeira, then getting Brian McCann to line out to end the game.

Asked about the ninth after the 4-1 win, Angels manager Mike Scioscia said: “Ernie’s got to be part of it. Joe Smith’s throwing the ball very well, and Ernie’s going to be a big part of it, for sure.”

The important thing is that Frieri is throwing better. He’s twirled 4 2/3 hit-less innings since his demotion, giving up only one hit by pitch and striking out four batters. On Monday, he used his trademark fastball to record both of his punchouts.

“It’s coming  back,” Frieri said. “I’m just letting it go, stop thinking about painting the strike zone and let the movement of my fastball take care of itself. I felt pretty good today. My fastball had a lot of life, and I’m getting more control with my breaking pitches. I threw a pretty good changeup today, too; elevated my fastball whenever I wanted to. If I can do that, I’m going to be fine.”

Alden

Frieri demoted; Smith to close for Angels …

Ernesto FrieriIn the wake of Ernesto Frieri‘s ninth-inning meltdown in Washigton, D.C., the Angels have made a change in the ninth inning, with sidearm right-hander Joe Smith taking over closing duties while Frieri works in low-leverage situations, Angels manager Mike Scioscia announced prior to Friday’s series opener against the Yankees.

“We’ll go with Joe Smith in the next couple of opportunities and just get Ernie maybe off of that treadmill and let him get an inning or two where he can try to make some adjustments,” Scioscia said. “I think historically Ernie responds well to this. We need him. I think this is the best route to take to get to the final solution that we want.”

Frieri, who was charged with four earned runs in the walk-off loss against the Nationals on Wednesday, has two blown saves, a 9.35 ERA and five homers allowed in 8 2/3 innings to start the season. With Smith, signed to a three-year, $15.75 million contract over the offseason, taking over the ninth, the Angels will handle the setup duties by committee. Michael Kohn, who has a 1.54 ERA in 12 appearances, could handle the eighth inning off the bat.

The goal is for Frieri to find it again and re-emerge as the closer.

“I think he understands it,” Scioscia said of Frieri. “And I think that he understands the team’s need right now maybe outweigh where he is. He’ll get it back. Just as he’s worked his way into the ninth-inning role from when we acquired him a couple years ago, he’ll work his way back there. He had a great season for us last year, and he’ll find it.”

Over the previous two years, Frieri — acquired in the May 2012 trade with the Padres — has posted a 3.07 ERA, a 1.11 WHIP, a 13.1 strikeouts-per-nine rate and 60 saves, while ranking eighth in the Majors in save percentages. But he’s also prone to giving up a lot of homers (1.1 homers per nine innings in his career), walking batters (4.3 career walk rate) and the occasional slump.

Last year, when Frieri gave up 12 runs in a 4 2/3-inning stretch that spanned from July 23 to Aug. 6, Scioscia changed it up in the ninth, put Frieri in less stressful situations, reinserted him later, and watched as he posted a 1.66 ERA in 19 outings the rest of the way.

He’s hoping for similar results this time.

“I think it’s a feel thing with Ernie; it’s a release-point issue,” Scioscia said. “I think mechanically he’s fine. At times he’s overthrowing, and I think when he tries to overthrow, you see him miss some of the spots that he can normally get the ball to. He’s not really a fine control guy, but he definitely knows what area he wants to throw the ball into and is usually pretty good at getting it there. He’s missing anywhere from down and away to up and in to lefties and that’s not a good way to miss.”

Alden

Ernesto Frieri and the long ball …

Ernesto FrieriIt’s early — early enough for sample sizes to be very, very deceiving — but Ernesto Frieri‘s home-run rate has more than tripled.

Nats shortstop Ian Desmond led off the ninth inning of a three-run Angels lead on Monday night with a homer to left center — a 462-foot bomb that was the second longest in Nationals Park history — that went for Frieri’s fourth home run allowed in 8 1/3 innings. His home-runs-per-nine-innings rate is now 4.32, after being a relatively high 1.32 from 2012-13 (the Major League average was 0.99 in that span).

But Angels manager Mike Scioscia sees a silver lining.

“I think it’s pretty clear with Ernie that the balls that have been hit out of the park have been mistakes,” Scioscia said. “It’s not like he’s making good pitches and they’re hitting home runs.”

The ball Desmond hit out on Monday was an 0-1 fastball that was supposed to be low and away but ran middle-in. The one Mariners first baseman Justin Smoak hit out on April 2 was an 0-2 fastball that wasn’t quite high enough. The one Corey Hart followed up with immediately thereafter was a 3-2, chest-high fastball — a pitch that was supposed to be low and away. And the one A’s catcher John Jaso crushed to win the game on April 14 was a 1-2 fastball that grooved right down the middle.

“If they’re hitting good pitches, and they’re hitting them out of the park, and it’s where you’re trying to go with pitches,” Scioscia said, “I think you have a lot more work to do than if it’s a matter of you making a few more mistakes than you used to and they haven’t missed them.”

Yes, Frieri (5.40 ERA, 2-for-3 in saves) has missed his location with all four of the homers. But they’ve all come on his go-to fastball, a pitch hitters were supposed to have a harder time squaring up now that he’s added a changeup and slider.

The lineups for the second of a three-game series …

Angels (9-10)

J.B. Shuck, RF
Mike Trout, CF
Albert Pujols, 1B
Raul Ibanez, LF
Howie Kendrick, 2B
Erick Aybar, SS
David Freese, 3B
Chris Iannetta, C
Tyler Skaggs, SP

Nationals (11-9)

Denard Span, CF
Danny Espinosa, 2B
Jayson Werth, RF
Anthony Rendon, 3B
Ian Desmond, SS
Bryce Harper, LF
Tyler Moore, 1B
Sandy Leon, C
Taylor Jordan SP

Alden

Baylor could be back with team by April 28 …

Don BaylorAngels hitting coach Don Baylor is currently in physical therapy and manager Mike Scioscia is hopeful that he can rejoin the team when it returns from a three-city road trip, for the April 28 series opener against the Indians.

It’ll still be a while before Baylor can be in the dugout during games, and even longer before he can travel with the team. But Baylor, who suffered a fractured right femur while catching the ceremonial first pitch thrown by Vladimir Guerrero on Opening Day, can at least work with hitters and attend pregame hitters before home games in about 13 days.

“Don’s a tough guy,” Scioscia said. “He’s anxious to get back. We’ve texted a lot. He’s in touch with [hitting coaches] Dave [Hansen] and Paul [Sorrento] on a daily basis. He’s still keeping tabs on everything that’s going on.”

Baylor was discharged from UCI Medical Center on April 4, three days post-op. Based on his initial prognosis, the 64-year-old is still at least three weeks away from being able to put weight on his right side, so he’d probably be getting around on a walker upon returning to Angel Stadium.

Scioscia said he doesn’t “anticipate Don back in full force for a while.”

“Even being here and being in the dugout, getting involved; I’m not sure when that’s going to be.”

Some other pregame notes from Jackie Robinson Day …

  • Scioscia did not back off from his statements (and Howie Kendrick‘s) from Monday night regarding the bang-bang play at first base in the ninth inning: “We said it last night and we looked at it again yesterday. I don’t know what angle they were looking at, but the way it’s explained to us is the ball has to hit the back of a fielder’s mitt before you stop the play to see where the runner’s foot is. And Howie’s foot is clearly on the bag before that ball hits the back of [Daric] Barton’s mitt.
  • Asked if he believes David Freese, dropped to seventh after striking out twice in each of his last two games, is putting added pressure on himself, Scioscia said: “We’ve had those conversations with David and we monitored them very quickly. He’s very calm on the baseball field and I think he understands that he can play better than he did last year. Coming to a new team, there might be an element of that. But I think he’s very comfortable with the teammates, he’s very comfortable with what his role was on the club, and hopefully he’ll start to hit stride and get the big hits that he’s capable of getting.”
  • It appears, though it’s unofficial yet, that Dane De La Rosa was reaclled from Triple-A Salt Lake so that he could be placed on the 15-day disabled list. Scioscia said the injury “is not significant” and that De La Rosa will continue in his throwing program. … Sean Burnett is playing catch again today and is expected to go to Arizona to throw off a mound in a few days. … And yes, Ernesto Frieri is still the closer.

Athletics (9-4)

John Jaso, C
Jed Lowrie, SS
Josh Donaldson, 3B
Brandon Moss, 1B
Yoenis Cespedes, LF
Alberto Callaspo, DH
Josh Reddick, RF
Craig Gentry, CF
Eric Sogard, 2B

SP: RH Dan Straily (1-1, 2.77 ERA)

Angels (6-7)

Kole Calhoun, RF
Mike Trout, CF
Albert Pujols, 1B
Raul Ibanez, DH
Howie Kendrick, 2B
J.B. Shuck, LF
David Freese, 3B
Chris Iannetta, C
Erick Aybar, SS

SP: RH Garrett Richards (2-0, 0.75 ERA)

Alden

An encouraging outing for Hector Santiago …

Hector SantiagoHector Santiago‘s Angels career started off 0-2, with eight earned runs in 9 1/3 innings through two starts against the Mariners.

He needed a change.

So he took the mound against the A’s on Monday with his socks up high for the first time.

“You gotta change it up sometimes,” Santiago said, trying to crack a smile despite a crushing 3-2 loss. “Actually, it was kind of scary, because the last two times I did that with the White Sox it didn’t go so well.”

The more tangible difference was that Santiago had much better command in the opener of a three-game series, while pitching seven innings of one-run ball in what ended up being a no-decision because of John Jaso‘s two-run, ninth-inning homer off Ernesto Frieri. Against an A’s team that came in ranked third in the American League in walks, Santiago — with his career walk rate at 4.6 — didn’t issue a free pass until the seventh inning and didn’t allow much hard contact besides Yoenis Cespedes‘ fourth-inning solo homer.

Santiago felt “more in control of myself,” and that was particularly obvious while working out of jams in the sixth and seventh.

The Angels’ defense extended Santiago’s inning in the sixth, when Erick Aybar had a tough time reading Craig Gentry’s liner off the bat and Albert Pujols threw high of second on an ensuing pickoff. But Santiago got Jed Lowrie to line out and struck out Josh Donaldson for his third punchout. The A’s put runners on first and second with one out in the seventh, but Santiago induced a flyout of Nick Punto and came back from down 3-0 to get Josh Reddick to pop out behind the plate.

This was the kind of outing the 26-year-old left-hander badly needed.

“Definitely; there’s no doubt,” Santiago said after lowering his ERA from 7.71 to 4.96. “Coming into today I was like, ‘I need some positive [momentum] moving forward. [First start of the season], I was antsy, man. I had a lot of adrenaline going. First game as an Angel. Last game I think I was just like, ‘OK, forget about it and let’s attack. Let’s go at ‘em, let’s go as hard as I can as long as I can.’ Today I was like, ‘Let’s attack, but let’s be under control.’ I took a little bit from each of those first two games and made it work in this game.”

And for next game, the high socks will return.

“Oh, there’s no doubt,” Santiago said. “I’m going to stick with it until it tells me not to. … I love the look, you know. I love the look for sure. And sometimes you just have to mix it up.”

Alden

De La Rosa, Burnett throw in sim game …

Dane De La RosaKey Angels relievers Dane De La Rosa and Sean Burnett took important steps in their respective rehab programs while taking part in simulated games at Angel Stadium early Wednesday afternoon.

Not a moment too soon.

The Angels’ bullpen has started the year by giving up eight runs over six innings through the first two games, with closer Ernesto Frieri and setup man Joe Smith sitting idly by as the middle relievers struggled to keep small deficits manageable. On Monday, Kevin Jepsen and Nick Maronde gave up six runs in the ninth. On Tuesday, Michael Kohn gave up two more in the ninth.

But by the time the Angels play their next home game — on April 11 against the Mets, following a six-game road trip through Houston and Seattle — De La Rosa expects to be back.

“I’m getting antsy,” said De La Rosa, who’s working his way back from a right forearm strain suffered on March 6. “When we get everybody healthy, together at the same time, we’re going to be a shutdown bullpen.”

Before April comes to an end, Burnett — limited to 13 games last year, recovering from August elbow surgery — also hopes to return, giving the Angels a critical late-inning lefty reliever.

“I just want to get out there and play,” Burnett said. “I’m a baseball player. It’s been what I’ve doing since I was a little kid. I’m itching to get back out there.”

De La Rosa, who has already taken part in a couple of Minor League games, threw roughly 35 pitches in the bullpen and 25 more to hitters knew what was coming ahead of time. When the Angels hit the road, De La Rosa will venture out on a rehab assignment with Double-A Arkansas in hopes of being activated by next Friday.

Burnett threw 30-some-odd pitches in the bullpen and another 15 in the sim game. It was his first time facing hitters since May 26, 2013, and called it “the biggest hurdles I think I can possibly clear.” He’ll throw in another sim game in Arizona in two days, then hope to go out on a rehab assignment after that.

“I couldn’t throw the ball much better than I did today,” Burnett said. “Now it’s just arm strength, building up to 25, 30 pitches.”

Here are the lineups for the series finale, with the tarp currently on the field …

Mariners (2-0)

Abraham Almonte, CF
Brad Miller, SS
Robinson Cano, 2B
Justin Smoak, 1B
Corey Hart, DH
Stefen Romero, RF
Dustin Ackley, LF
Mike Zunino, C
Willie Bloomquist, 3B

SP: LH James Paxton (0-0, -.– ERA)

Angels (0-2)

Kole Calhoun, RF
Mike Trout, CF
Albert Pujols, 1B
David Freese, 3B
Josh Hamilton, LF
Howie Kendrick, 2B
Raul Ibanez, DH
Chris Iannetta, C
Erick Aybar, SS

SP: LH Hector Santiago (0-0, -.– ERA)

Alden

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