Results tagged ‘ Erick Aybar ’

Lineups and Notes, ST Game 2 …

The first five hitters are starting off the Cactus League schedule playing in back-to-back games and the Angels’ Opening Day starter gets his first outing against the Rockies …

Kole Calhoun, RF
Mike Trout, CF
Albert Pujols, 1B
Matt Joyce, DH
Erick Aybar, SS
Collin Cowgill, LF
Drew Butera, C
Grant Green, 2B
Kyle Kubitza, 3B

SP: RH Jered Weaver

  • When Cesar Ramos was acquired in early November, the Angels made him one promise and only one promise: “You’ll pitch.” It was a refreshing sentiment for the 30-year-old left-hander who frequently went 15 days without pitching in Tampa Bay. Angels manager Mike Scioscia said “his best role is to match up against a lefty. He spins the ball wall, but he can give you long or multi-innings if you have to.” Ramos has never really been used as a lefty specialist. He has a four-pitch mix, but could shorten that if he’s pitching to only one or two batters a game. Scioscia said the Angels “need enough length in our staff” in order to free Ramos up to be a lefty specialist. The presence of Cory Rasmus could accomplish that.
  • Matt Harvey made his first post-Tommy John surgery start for the Mets on Friday, and Tyler Skaggs — in the early part of his own recovery from TJ — is monitoring his progress, as well as Jose Fernandez‘s. “I want to see how they do,” Skaggs said. “I would think that I’ll come back stronger, better. I want to see if these guys are going to do that.”
  • Andrew Heaney and Nick Tropeano will both pitch in Monday’s game, with Heaney likely starting. After that it’ll go to Hector Santiago once again. C.J. Wilson and Matt Shoemaker go Saturday and Sunday, respectively.
  • Rockies lineup here. In case you missed it, here’s a handy little Spring Training guide.

Alden

Opening Day lineup? Possibly …

Asked if his first lineup of Cactus League play will be the same as his Opening Day lineup, Angels manager Mike Scioscia just laughed. But it sure is possible, perhaps likely (except Jered Weaver would be starting, of course).

Here’s what it looks like …

Kole Calhoun, RF
Mike Trout, CF
Albert Pujols, 1B
Matt Joyce, LF
David Freese, 3B
Erick Aybar, SS
C.J. Cron, DH
Chris Iannetta, C
Josh Rutledge, 2B

SP: LH Hector Santiago

  • Each player will get at least two at-bats, with Santiago — who has thrown like 25 bullpen sessions before this start — will go two or three innings.
  • Jose Alvarez, Adam Wilk, Cory Rasmus, Trevor Gott and Jeremy McBryde are slated to pitch in this game, as well.
  • Scioscia doesn’t think it’ll tough to get all the rotation candidates innings. They have a split-squad game on the 14th and a “B” game on the 19th.
  • Garrett Richards will repeat the PFP drills he completed yesterday, and his next step could be throwing to hitters in live BP. That could be his final stage before making his Cactus League debut.
  • The Angels still plan to fold Joyce into first base to see if he’s an option to play there part time.
  • In case you missed it, I categorized each of the 63 players who were invited to Angels Spring Training here.

Alden

Santiago to start Thursday, then Weaver-CJ-Shoe

Hector Santiago will start the Angels’ Cactus League opener against the Brewers on Thursday, Mike Scioscia announced. Following him, respectively, will be Jered Weaver, C.J. Wilson and Matt Shoemaker, which means that in all likelihood, Weaver-Wilson-Shoemaker will be the rotation order for the season-opening three-game series in Seattle April 6-8.

The Angels don’t necessarily order their starting pitchers based on righty or lefty; they like to make sure they don’t connect the guys who have the best chance of pitching deep in games, which is perhaps why Weaver and Shoemaker aren’t back-to-back.

Santiago will compete with Nick Tropeano and Andrew Heaney for a rotation spot, and there’s a good chance two of the three crack the Opening Day roster with Garrett Richards likely to start the season on the disabled list. Cory Rasmus, Drew Rucinski, Jose Alvarez and the non-roster invitees are dark-horse candidates to crack the rotation, as well.

Scioscia said he expects all of his everyday guys — namely, Mike Trout, Albert Pujols, Erick Aybar, Kole Calhoun, David Freese, Chris Iannetta and Matt Joyce — to play in the Cactus League opener from Tempe Diablo Stadium. Starters will go two to three innings the first time through the order.

Weaver would be on track to make five Cactus League starts, then be on five days’ rest before Opening Day, though he could opt for the extra day of rest earlier so that he’s on a normal schedule for his first start of the season. Scioscia doesn’t like to announce his Opening Day starter until the very end, but Weaver is on track to start his franchise-record seventh Opening Day (and sixth in a row).

Some other notes from Wednesday’s workout …

  • Tony Clark, executive director of the MLBPA, couldn’t comment on the Josh Hamilton situation because it’s an ongoing process and doesn’t know when Major League Baseball would announce what looks like a likely suspension. Clark did say, “What I hope for is support for Josh.”
  • The MLBPA was visiting Angels camp as its last stop in Arizona, and the two main topics of discussion were pace-of-play initiatives and a reported tobacco ban in California. Hamilton didn’t come up during the one-hour meeting, Clark said.
  • Richards is throwing his sixth bullpen session on Wednesday morning and Scioscia said he’ll simulate coming off the mound to cover first base for the first time.
  • Lefty reliever Atahualpa Severino has finally arrived in camp after having visa issues in the Dominican Republic. Cuban middle infielder Roberto Baldoquin could report over the weekend.

Alden

No Spring Training for Baldoquin, etc. …

Angels fans who want to get an up-close look at Roberto Baldoquin this spring will probably have to walk over to the Minor League side of the Tempe Diablo Stadium complex.

The Angels have opted against inviting the 20-year-old Cuban middle infielder to Major League Spring Training, mostly because they’ll have a lot of infielders competing for jobs but also because they want to give Baldoquin a chance to develop on his own time, without added pressure.

Since signing Baldoquin to an $8 million signing bonus – a commitment that added up to about $15 million because of the overage tax – the Angels have added Josh Rutledge, Johnny Giavotella and Taylor Featherston, all of whom will compete for the starting second base and utility infield job, along with Grant Green. Baldoquin will likely start the season at Class A Inland Empire, exclusively playing shortstop, and hasn’t really played in organized games since he left Cuba nearly a year ago.

“There’s only so much space to go around, or time that you can provide,” Angels general manager Jerry Dipoto said Tuesday. “Roberto being 20 years old, being over a year removed from competitive baseball outside of whatever he’s doing at our facility in the Dominican Republic, we felt like this was probably in his best interest and in the best interest of developing him.”

Baldoquin agreed to terms in early November, signed his first professional contract a few days before Christmas and has spent the month working out at the Angels’ academy in the Dominican, where Dipoto said he’s getting “glowing reviews for his leadership and work ethic.”

Baldoquin will spend the mornings working out on the Major League side during Spring Training and could take part in some Cactus League games as an extra player, but will mostly spend the spring working with fellow Minor Leaguers.

The Angels aren’t expecting him in the big leagues until the start of 2017, the first year shortstop Erick Aybar won’t be in the books.

“In Roberto’s case, the smartest thing we can do is slow the wheels down a little bit,” Dipoto said. “No rush. We need to make sure we’re exercising good judgment.”

Below are some additional Angels-related notes, with 23 days left until pitchers and catchers report for their physicals …

  • The Angels plan to start negotiating an extension with closer Huston Street during Spring Training and have already broached the subject with Street himself, a source said. The Angels exercised their $7 million club option on Street early in the offseason and would like to lock the 31-year-old right-hander up before he hits free agency next winter. They’d also be open to negotiating an extension with catcher Chris Iannetta, also a pending free agent, and Garrett Richards, who’s in the first of four arbitration years. But those talks probably wouldn’t begin until after Opening Day.
  • Before starting extension talks with Richards, they need to agree on his 2015 salary. Richards’ arbitration hearing is set for Feb. 11 and both sides have only made slow progress thus far. Richards is one of three arbitration-eligible players remaining for the Angels, along with pending free agents David Freese and Matt Joyce.
  • Richards, who has spent his offseason training in Arizona, is running on 75 percent of his body weight and is expected to progress to 100 percent next week. He should be throwing off a mound around the time workouts begin.
  • Dipoto wouldn’t comment on extension talks or arbitration negotiations, but did express confidence that he’d avoid an arbitration hearing with all three players. “Right now,” he said, “there’s no expectation that we won’t avoid a hearing, but no fear of going to a hearing if that’s what it comes to. Right now, the conversations have been seamless. Normal rhetoric, and I feel we’re in a good position with all three.”
  • The Angels recently signed veteran right-handers Frank Herrmann and Zach Stewart to Minor League contracts. Herrmann, a 30-year-old reliever who posted a 4.26 ERA in 95 appearances with the Indians from 2010-12, will be invited to Spring Training. Stewart, a 28-year-old swing man who had a 6.82 ERA in 103 innings from 2011-12, will not. The Angels would still like to acquire a Triple-A shortstop on a Minor League deal, and that may be the final move they make this winter.

Alden

Angels waiting on Baldoquin’s visa to finish deal

The Angels’ $8 million agreement with Cuban middle infielder Roberto Baldoquin, terms of which were reported on Tuesday, is still hinging on a visa.

Once Baldoquin secures a visitor visa from the Dominican Republic, he can fly to the United States, take his physical, sign on the dotted line and officially join the Angels’ organization. There’s no telling when that will happen – it could be early next week, it could be late in the offseason – but it’s expected to get done eventually.

Baldoquin, who turns 21 in May, would likely be invited to Major League Spring Training and could start the season in Double-A. The 20-year-old right-handed hitter is deemed by some evaluators to already be capable of handling shortstop at the Major League level, but still needs to prove he can produce consistently at the plate.

The addition of Baldoquin would represent the Angels’ first major signing of a Cuban prospect since Kendrys Morales in 2005, and it ends up being about a $14 million commitment due to international spending rules.

The Angels began the international signing period – on July 2 – with a pool of $2,383,700, which has since gone down to roughly $2 million. Because they are expected to exceed the pool by 15 percent or more with the Baldoquin signing, they’ll have to pay a 100-percent tax on the overage and won’t be allowed to sign a player for more than $300,000 over the next two signing periods.

The Angels don’t see the latter as an issue, since they rarely make that type of commitment in the international market and will have the lowest spending pool next year. They’re OK with paying a heavy tax because it doesn’t count towards the luxury tax and because they see Baldoquin as a polished player who could’ve secured a more lucrative, multi-year contract had he been a typical Cuban free agent.

Because he is under 23 and has not played in a Cuban professional league for at least five seasons, Baldoquin is instead subject to the international signing guidelines. That lowers his value and makes him the equivalent of an amateur Draft pick, which means the Angels can stash Baldoquin in the Minor Leagues and he can’t be a free agent until he attains the typical six years of Major League service time.

Baldoquin is expected to be ready to take over at shortstop once Erick Aybar’s contract expires after the 2016 season and could take over for second baseman Howie Kendrick once his contract expires after 2015. The Angels will continue to explore trading Kendrick this season, and Baldoquin’s bat may also profile at third base.

The Angels will face tight restrictions over the next couple of international signing periods, but that doesn’t mean they’ll splurge for what’s left of this one. (Remember, they still face a 100-percent tax on every dollar they spend this year.) They’ll keep tabs on another Cuban infielder, 19-year-old Yoan Moncada, but aren’t expected to go after him hard.

Baldoquin played three seasons for Las Tunas in Cuba’s Serie Nacional, the top league on the island, and was also part of the country’s 16-and-under national team. He’s been training in the Dominican Republic since February and has worked out at the Angels’ academy on the island several times.

Alden

Stories, Twitter handles leading up to the ALDS …

Royals Angels Baseball

The American League Division Series is finally here, and we’ve had a lot of content leading up to it. So, I thought it’d be a good idea to organize it all in one spot, in case you missed anything along the way and would like to give something a read …

Angels

A look at Mike Trout’s likely MVP season and who he’s evolving to as a hitter
On Jered Weaver — his success without velocity and why he may be at his best right now
Odds are against Josh Hamilton in the ALDS, and maybe that’s what finally gets him going
How “Win For GRich” became a rallying cry for the Angels this season
Q&A with Jerry Dipoto, on Mike Scioscia, ALDS chances and keeping the Angels relevant
Good friends Erick Aybar and Albert Pujols, guiding each other through their 30s
Five reasons the Angels won the American League West
Five reasons the Angels can win the World Series
A look at how the Angels were constructed
A look at the Angels’ postseason history
Finally, Mike Trout gets to play in the postseason
The Angels have a plan to counter a questionable rotation
The Angels’ 2014 season, by the numbers

ALDS

A preview for Game 1
Position-by-position breakdown of the ALDS
Royals-Angels Did You Know
Three Keys for the Angels to beat the Royals in the ALDS
Tale Of The Tape for Game 1
Angels face a big challenge taming the Royals’ running game
Will rust affect the Angels in the ALDS?

We have a great crew for the ALDS, and below are their Twitter handles …

Bill Hill (series editor)
Dick Kaegel (Royals beat reporter)
Lyle Spencer (columnist)
Phil Rogers (columnist)
Matthew DeFranks (Angels in Anaheim)
T.R. Sullivan (Royals)
AJ Cassavell (Royals in Anaheim)
Jesse Sanchez (covering both clubs)
Jackson Alexander (Royals in Kansas City)

Alden

‘Wake Me Up When September Ends’ …

Josh Hamilton, Mike TroutThe Angels’ impressive four-game sweep of the A’s put them 30 games above .500, five games up in the American League West and 3 1/2 up (on the Orioles) for the best record in baseball. They’ll start September with five more wins than they had all of last year and a realistic chance of capturing the franchise record in wins. They’d have to play .692 ball over the season’s final month; they’ve played .610 ball through the season’s first five months.

Here’s a look at how the Angels have to fare in September for certain milestones.

90 wins: 7-19
95 wins: 12-14
100 wins: 17-9
101 wins (club record): 18-8

This is the ninth time the Angels have held sole possession of first place in the AL West to start September. On five of the previous eight occasions, they went on to win the division. They blew 2 1/2-game leads in 1985 and ’98, and epically blew a 7 1/2-game lead with one month left in ’95.

So Angels manager Mike Scioscia has good reason to not look ahead.

“I know a lot of people are counting down, under 30 games — not us,” he said. “We know we have a long way to go. You want to ask me [about the standings] in about three weeks, we’ll sit down and talk. Right now, we are still in the heart of the pennant race. We need to chew this off one inning, one pitch, one game at a time.”

The Angels are off on Monday, then start a bizarre 10-game, four-city road trip through Houston (two games), Minnesota (four games), Cleveland (one game) and Arlington (three games). The Angels’ bullpen will continue to do some heavy lifting in September.

Some additional tidbits from Sunday …

  • Angels pitchers had a streak of 29 consecutive scoreless innings snapped in the eighth inning. It was tied for the longest in team history. … Sunday marked the fourth four-game sweep by the Angels this season, the most in their history. … Nineteen wins in August matched a franchise best (also done in 1986 and 2004). … This is the Angels’ largest division lead and their most games above .500 since the end of the 2009 season (10 games up, 32 games over). … At 83-53, the Angels have matched the best pace in club history after 136 games.
  • Mike Trout hit his 31st homer on Sunday and drove in three runs, giving him 97 on the year. All of those home runs and all but two of those RBIs have come from the No. 2 spot in the lineup. Among No. 2 hitters throughout history, the 23-year-old center fielder heads into September tied for ninth in homers (Eddie Mathews leads with 46 in 1959) and 10th in RBIs (Mathews and Alex Rodriguez in 1998 each had 114).
  • Matt Shoemaker is the first rookie with 14-plus wins and 115-plus strikeouts before September since CC Sabathia in 2001. He’s been a great story.
  • Chris Iannetta now leads the Angels in on-base percentage at .380 — six points higher than Trout.
  • Erick Aybar‘s hitting streak is now at a career-high 16 games. The veteran shortstop is batting .458 (27-for-59) during that span.

Alden

Richards injures knee, carried out on stretcher …

Garrett RichardsGarrett Richards’ left knee buckled while sprinting to cover first base in Wednesday’s second inning at Fenway Park and had to be carted off the field in a stretcher. The Angels initially called it a left patellar injury, awaiting further evaluations before announcing anything more definitive.

Nonetheless, the ailment looks serious.

And now the first-place Angels — sporting a one-game lead on the A’s for the best record in the Majors when play began — are facing the scenario of potentially being without their best starting pitcher for the rest of the season, with little help available in their Minor League system.

With one out, runners on first and second and the Red Sox leading, 2-0, in the bottom of the second, Brock Holt hit a grounder to the right side that Albert Pujols fielded and fired to shortstop Erick Aybar at second. Richards came over for the potential inning-ending double play, but collapsed just before reaching the bag and was on the ground for about eight minutes.

All of the Angels starters surrounded Richards, with Pujols momentarily holding Richards’ hand and Red Sox designated hitter David Ortiz came out to show his support as they lifted the 26-year-old right-hander onto the stretcher, a moment that drew a standing ovation from Red Sox fans in attendance.

Richards entered Wednesday’s start 13-4 with a 2.53 ERA and 164 strikeouts in 167 innings, numbers that made him a candidate for the AL’s Cy Young Award. The Angels have already lost 23-year-old starter Tyler Skaggs to Tommy John surgery, and are thin on starting pitching in their farm system. Potential call-ups from Triple-A include lefty Wade LeBlanc (4.00 ERA in 21 starts), lefty Randy Wolf (5.26 ERA in 25 2/3 innings) and righty Chris Volstad (5.45 ERA in six starts). Another option could be lefty Michael Roth, who is 10-6 with a 2.82 ERA in 20 starts for Double-A Arkansas.

Below are some of the tweets that have been sent out in support of Richards …

Alden

As Trout goes, so does the offense …

Mike TroutThe Angels have a deep offense; one of the deepest in the game. They have Albert Pujols, a Hall of Famer if he retired today. They have Josh Hamilton, one of the most dynamic players in the game (at least that’s what he was in Texas). They have Erick Aybar, Howie Kendrick, Kole Calhoun, David Freese, etc. — all solid hitters in their own right. They’re more than just Mike Trout.

But even they struggle to produce when the game’s best all-around player isn’t right.

The Angels — losers of back-to-back games after a 4-3 defeat on Wednesday — have averaged 3.25 runs per game since the start of the second half, all while Trout has found himself in the midst of a rare (and perhaps short) slump.

“We have to be more than Mike,” Angels manager Mike Scioscia said, “and we know we are.”

But here’s a breakdown of how the team has fared along with Trout so far this season (Trout’s slash line is in parenthesis, followed by the Angels’ runs per game and their record during that stretch) …

March 31 to April 28 (.327/.391/.606): 5.44 RPG; 12-13
April 29 to May 19 (.164/.314/.358): 4.21 RPG; 12-7
May 20 to July 13 (.356/.440/.701): 5.24 RPG; 33-17
July 18 to July 30 (.220/.304/.420): 3.25 RPG; 6-6

The league average for runs per game this season is 4.11, so the Angels still manage to do pretty well when Trout struggles from the No. 2 spot. Clearly, though, they’re at a completely different level when he’s on point. And luckily for them, his hot streaks tend to last a lot longer than his cold ones.

Asked how he feels at the plate these days, Trout said: “Timing’s a little late right now. Just picking the ball up late. Ones that I should be hitting I’m seeing late and I’m rushing my swing. That’s a little fix; nothing to worry about.”

Alden

Erick Aybar not in lineup, but ready to go …

Erick AybarErick Aybar was out of the starting lineup for a third straight day on Monday, a precaution for the sore right groin the Angels’ shortstop suffered while reaching first base on a ninth-inning single against the Mariners on Friday night.

Prior to batting practice, though, Aybar did some light agility drills on the field with strength-and-conditioning coordinator T.J. Harrington, then took some BP and felt good. The 30-year-old — an All-Star for the first time while sporting a .283/.320/.409 slash line — expects to return to the starting lineup on Tuesday and should be available off the bench for Monday’s series opener against the Orioles.

The groin initially bothered the switch-hitter while batting from the right side of the plate.

“But I’m good now, from both sides,” Aybar said in Spanish. “I’ll be ready to go tomorrow. They told me one more day, and then tomorrow I’ll [return to the starting lineup]. But I’m ready for whatever they need today, too.”

Some other notes as the Angels look to build on a Major League-best .824 winning percentage in July …

  • As I type this, C.J. Wilson is throwing his first bullpen session since landing on the disabled list with a sprained right ankle on July 10. Wilson said he has “no idea” how much longer he’ll have to be on the shelf. “It’s going to be how does it feel today throwing, and then after throwing tomorrow.” Wilson will eventually have to go out onto a rehab assignment. “I’m going to have to adjust to how it feels, because it’s not just going to heal itself in a week,” he added. “Some of the adjustment is going to have to be pain tolerance and things like that. And just learning how to use a somewhat-destabilized ankle.”
  • From Matthew DeFranks: Collin Cowgill rejoined the Angels on Monday and said he should return from the disabled list in a couple of weeks, barring an unforeseen setback. Cowgill broke his nose and thumb after he was hit by a Matt West pitch trying to bunt on July 13. Cowgill, who flew in from his home Kentucky on Sunday night, had stitches removed from his nose on Monday and said it would probably be another few days before he can take any swings.
  • The Angels signed veteran catcher John Buck to a Minor League deal and assigned him to Triple-A Salt Lake, where they currently have three active catchers. Buck, 34, was released from the Mariners on Tuesday after batting .226/.293/.286. For the Angels, he can be a third catcher when rosters expand in September — unless he finds an immediate Major League opportunity before then.

Lineup …

Kole Calhoun, RF
Mike Trout, CF
Albert Pujols, 1B
Josh Hamilton, DH
Howie Kendrick, 2B
David Freese, 3B
Efren Navarro, LF
Hank Conger, C
John McDonald, SS

SP: RH Matt Shoemaker (7-2, 4.38 ERA)

Alden

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