Results tagged ‘ C.J. Wilson ’

You can win in October without dominant starters …

Mike Scioscia, Dino EbelIt’s no secret. If the Angels — considering a three-man rotation for the American League Division Series — are to go far in the playoffs, they’ll have to rely heavily on their deep bullpen.

The question is: Will it work?

One of baseball’s dogmas says teams that are “built for the playoffs” are the ones that have dominant starting pitching. But in the Wild Card era, that hasn’t proven to be true. Consider: Since 1995, the Major League quality-start percentage has been 48.88 in the regular season, 48.88 in the postseason and 51.96 in the World Series; in terms of innings per start, it’s 5.91 in the regular season, 5.76 in the postseason and 5.88 in the World Series. That’s a very negligible difference, especially when you consider all the bad teams that are lumped into that regular-season category.

Now here’s a case-by-case look at each of the last 19 World Series champions, with the first stat being innings per start and the second being the amount of quality starts throughout the postseason …

2013 Red Sox: 5.81 IP, 8 of 16 QS
2012 Giants: 5.64 IP, 6 of 16 QS
2011 Cardinals: 5.11 IP, 7 of 18 QS
2010 Giants: 6.44 IP, 11 of 15 QS
2009 Yankees: 6.29 IP, 11 of 15 QS
2008 Phillies: 5.9 IP, 10 of 14 QS
2007 Red Sox: 6 IP, 6 of 14 QS
2006 Cardinals: 6.20 IP, 10 of 16 QS
2005 White Sox: 7.66 IP, 9 of 12 QS
2004 Red Sox: 5.61 IP, 9 of 14 QS
2003 Marlins: 5.66 IP, 8 of 17 QS
2002 Angels: 5.02 IP, 2 of 16 QS
2001 D-backs: 7.08 IP, 14 of 17 QS
2000 Yankees: 6.42 IP, 8 of 16 QS
1999 Yankees: 6.58 IP, 10 of 12 QS
1998 Yankees: 6.79 IP, 9 of 13 QS
1997 Marlins: 5.83 IP, 5 of 16 QS
1996 Yankees: 5.42 IP, 5 of 15 QS
1995 Braves: 6.64 IP, 10 of 14 QS

That’s nine of 19 champions that got less than six innings per start during the playoffs, and seven that won the World Series despite receiving a quality start in less than half of their postseason games. Look at the 2002 Angels. Stunning. Managers tend to have quick hooks in the playoffs, because it’s all hands on deck and because the off days tend to keep bullpens relatively fresh.

So, you can win in October with a deep bullpen, a good offense and a rotation that keeps you in the game. And the Angels have the potential for that. Since Garrett Richards went down, Jered Weaver, C.J. Wilson, Matt Shoemaker and Hector Santiago have allowed three earned runs or less in 20 of 23 starts (includes tonight).

Just something to think about.

Alden

Sound bites from the Angels’ clincher …

Jered WeaverHere’s what several members of the Angels had to say after clinching the American League West on Wednesday night

Leadoff man Kole Calhoun, on popping the first bottle of champagne after the A’s lost: “I was more nervous to pop that first bottle of champagne than I was to play baseball.”

Catcher Hank Conger, on watching the game from the clubhouse: “They came back that ninth inning, and everybody was like, ‘Don’t jinx anything, don’t pop anything yet.’ As soon as they made that last out, that groundball, everyone erupted, man. Everybody was hugging each other, champagne was flowing everywhere, man, it was unbelievable.”

President John Carpino, on the fans sticking around to watch: “It’s so special. It’s so special. Look at these people. It’s 11:15 and the game has been over for an hour and a half. Angels fans have a lot of passion.”

Third baseman David Freese, on battling adversity: “You look at every team, up and down the league, and every team goes through adversity, things like that. This group just keeps plugging away. It shows. To win a division like this, it’s unbelievable. What a great group.”

Ace Jered Weaver, on coming out and seeing the fans: “Indescribable, really. This is the only reason why they’re here; they want to see us win. It’s been long overdue. Hopefully we can make a good push here in the postseason.”

Owner Arte Moreno, on his favorite part about the team: “There’s probably not one sentence you can say. They all love each other, they all like each other, they have fun together, and we have a really great mix of veterans, and we have a lot of young people. People were questioning how many young people we have in the organization, but just a lot of young guys stepped up this year.”

Manager Mike Scioscia, on returning to the playoffs after a four-year absence: “It feels great. We had gotten close, but we won our division, and we couldn’t be prouder of these guys.”

Center fielder Mike Trout, on playing in the postseason: “I’m just going to go out there, play my game and help my team win. I’m not going to put too much pressure on myself. I know the atmosphere is going to be awesome, and it’s going to be fun for sure.”

First baseman Albert Pujols, on the group: “Great chemistry. Like I’ve said before, you don’t just win with one or two guys. It takes 25 guys for us to accomplish our goals. We have a great group of guys, starting in Spring Training. I’ve been saying it all year long. And we believe in each other. We’re picking each other up.”

Starter C.J. Wilson, on his start: “It’s good. It’s what I need to do. If we’re going to win, I need to pitch like that.”

General manager Jerry Dipoto, on what it took to turn it all around: “It’s just a thrill. Mike and the staff had a great year. They did an unbelievable job, kept everybody together and cohesive. Obviously we made some changes along the way, but most importantly it was the character and the makeup of the guys. When the boat left the dock this spring, that’s what we talked so much about, and that’s what these guys did. They really did. They bound together. Very proud of them.”

Alden

Shoemaker has ‘very mild’ left oblique strain …

Matt ShoemakerTuesday’s MRI revealed what Matt Shoemaker said was a “very mild” strain in his left oblique, an injury that occurred while facing his final hitter in 7 2/3 innings of one-run ball against the Mariners on Monday. Angels manager Mike Scioscia said Shoemaker will miss his next scheduled start on Saturday, with yet another bullpen game likely taking place.

Everything else, including Shoemaker’s availability for the postseason, is up in the air.

“The good thing about it is they said it’s mild, so we’re going to literally take it day-by-day,” Shoemaker said. “It’s all by feel. I feel better than I did yesterday, which is a good thing. It’s just soreness, which is to be expected.”

Scioscia isn’t addressing any questions about the Angels in the playoffs because, in his mind, they haven’t clinched a postseason berth until they nail down the American League West title and thus avoid a do-or-die Wild Card game (the Angels’ magic number is three heading into Tuesday). Asked if he’s at least been assured that he can be ready to pitch in the playoffs, Shoemaker said: “Very optimistically, yeah. There’s not been one thing set in stone that says you’re going to be ready in one week, you’re going to be ready in two weeks. There’s none of that. I’m going to show up tomorrow, do more treatment and see how it feels. So, we’ll know something each day.”

The Angels’ standing allows them to rest Shoemaker as long as possible, and they can back him up as deep as Game 4 of the AL Division Series, which would be slated for Oct. 6. Jered Weaver, C.J. Wilson and Hector Santiago would start the first three games.

Shoemaker suffered the injury while throwing a couple of sliders to Mariners catcher Humberto Quintero with two outs in the eighth inning at Angel Stadium on Monday, ultimately forcing him into an RBI groundout and then exiting with 96 pitches under his belt. The 27-year-old rookie, now 16-4 with a 3.04 ERA in 136 innings, only feels the oblique injury when he does “abnormal movements,” and was encouraged by the fact he already feels better than he did on Monday night.

“The news,” Scioscia said, “could’ve been much worse.”

But oblique strains are tricky. Their time frames can vary, and sometimes, when players think they’ve fully recovered from them, they creep back up. Shoemaker will continue to get treatment and right now, Scioscia said, “it’s open-ended” as to when he can pick up a baseball again.

“You never know where these things go with pitchers,” Scioscia said. “Like hamstring injuries, they have a life of their own, can go a lot of different ways. But Matt does feel that there’s not that much discomfort today. We’ll monitor it these next few days and see where it goes.”

The Angels have already lost two key starters in Garrett Richards (left knee surgery) and Tyler Skaggs (Tommy John surgery) since the start of August, and don’t have a fifth starter to take the ball on the days Richards’ spot comes up (reliever Cory Rasmus will start in his place for the fourth straight time, with Scioscia hopeful of getting the usual three to four innings).

Shoemaker’s absence would be crippling in October.

“Unfortunately, right now, you’re talking about three-fifths of your rotation you’re depending a lot on that are out,” Scioscia said. “But you have to move forward, you have to keep pitching, you have to keep getting outs, and we’re confident we will. It just might be a little bit unconventional right now how we do so.”

Additional injury notes …

  • After missing the last 11 games with stiffness near his right shoulder, Josh Hamilton returned to the Angels lineup on Tuesday, batting sixth and serving as the designated hitter. The 33-year-old had what Scioscia hoped was a “breakthrough” workout on Monday, taking batting practice on the field and running the bases. He planned to return on Wednesday, but Scioscia said he “felt great after working in the cage.”
  • Albert Pujols exited Monday’s game in the third inning because of a cramp in his left hamstring, but was right back in the lineup and starting at first base the following day. “Albert is adamant that there’s no pull,” Scioscia said. “The medical staff feels there’s nothing there but a cramp that, really, was gone after the game. We just wanted to err on the side of caution last night. We’ll monitor him in pregame closely today, but right now he feels good to go.”

Angels (94-56)

Kole Calhoun, RF
Mike Trout, CF
Pujols, 1B
Howie Kendrick, 2B
David Freese, 3B
Hamilton, DH
Erick Aybar, SS
Chris Iannetta, C
Collin Cowgill, LF

SP: RH Rasmus (3-1, 2.80 ERA)

Alden

No Garrett Richards against the A’s …

Garrett RichardsGarrett Richards starts the series opener against the Rangers on Friday, which means his next turn will be Wednesday in Boston, which means his next turn after that will be Monday, at home against the Marlins.

And that means the Angels’ best starting pitcher of 2014 won’t be starting against the team they’re chasing.

The Angels are in Oakland next weekend, and it’ll be Hector Santiago, C.J. Wilson and Jered Weaver starting on Friday, Saturday and Sunday, respectively. The only way Richards – 12-4 with a 2.54 ERA – could start against the first-place A’s would be to either skip his next turn or go on short rest.

It’s too early for that, Angels manager Mike Scioscia said, and that’s too dangerous for someone who’s in his first full year in a Major League rotation.

“We have a lot of baseball left,” Scioscia added, “and I think you want to make sure guys are rested and they come back. Most of those guys are going to be going on five days’ rest now – we don’t have many breaks – and if we have to reserve the right to bring them back on three days at the very end, if it’s meaningful, that’s something for the last week to 10 days of the season.”

If Richards pitches every five games the rest of the season, he’d start against the A’s at home on Aug. 30, then miss them in Oakland during the second-to-last series of the regular season. But the Angels have an off day on Sept. 1, their last one until Sept. 25, which Scioscia could use to line up his rotation for the final month.

But it isn’t time for that yet.

“I think it’s too early,” Scioscia said, “and where our guys are, we still need five guys going out there and throwing the ball to their capabilities.”

Here’s the Angels lineup …

Kole Calhoun, RF
Mike Trout, CF
Albert Pujols, 1B
Josh Hamilton, LF
Howie Kendrick, 2B
Erick Aybar, SS
Brennan Boesch, DH
David Freese, 3B
Chris Iannetta, C

SP: RH Richards

Alden

CJ: ‘”I have my good stuff; I’m just not locating’ …

C.J. WilsonFor C.J. Wilson, it’s quite simple: He isn’t throwing strikes.

“I have my good stuff; I’m just not locating it precisely,” Wilson said. “Precision is the issue.”

Wilson threw 46 of his 100 pitches for balls in Thursday’s 7-0 loss to the Dodgers. Of the 26 batters he faced, he started off 1-0 10 times and got into three-ball counts nine times. His strike percentage is now 58.6, which would represent a career low (it was 61.4 percent in his previous four years as a starter). His walk rate is 3.94, on pace to be his highest since 2012. And over his last five starts, a stretch in which he’s posted an 11.10 ERA, Wilson has issued 14 walks and two hit batters in 18 2/3 innings.

Angels manager Mike Scioscia said “this is probably the worst C.J. has struggled since he’s been a starting pitcher,” which is obvious. “But,” he added, “seeing how hard C.J. works, and seeing that it doesn’t look like it’s anything physical with him, we’re very confident that he’s going to get back on that beam and do what we need him to do.”

Stuff-wise, Chris Iannetta said, Wilson was “much better” from where he was in a six-run, 1 1/3-inning outing against the Rays on Saturday, his first since coming off the disabled list with a right ankle sprain.

“But that’s not saying much,” Wilson added, “because I think I could’ve thrown right-handed and pitched better last time.”

Wilson threw a 60-pitch bullpen session between starts, mainly because he only threw 50 of them in his previous game. Stamina-wise, he feels good. And besides a curveball that had way more bite than he wanted to on Thursday, his stuff is good. But he just can’t put it where he wants.

Here’s how Wilson explained it …

The location is the issue. There’s no issue with stuff or anything else; it’s just location. Today, you can watch the game, you can see the guys that are getting hits that are hitting the ball on the ground. They’re breaking their bats, balls are flaring in there. [Juan] Uribe hit the ball hard, but it’s not like dudes are taking Billy Madison swings and hitting balls off the rocks. The stuff is decent — making guys miss, striking guys out. It’s just the walks. It’s getting to the point where I’m throwing the ball at the corner and it’s not on the corner; it’s off the corner. Or trying to go in and it’s a little bit too far in. If you went through the video and watched every single pitch, the misses that I had tonight were pretty good misses for the most part.

Not good enough. Not by a long shot. Wilson is supposed to be the No. 2 starter in this rotation, a key cog for a team with World Series aspirations. But he’s 8-8 with a 4.82 ERA that’s the third-highest among qualified American League starters. And he’s scuffling at a time when the Angels need starting-pitching help more than ever.

Is he confident it’ll turn around?

“Very confident,” Wilson said, “because the quality of the stuff is there.”

Alden

Angels claim a reliever; can they claim a starter? …

The Angels claimed reliever Vinnie Pestano, a veteran sidearmer who was really good very recently (2.45 ERA in 137 appearances for the Indians from 2011-12) and who carries plenty of flexibility (he can be optioned this year and next year, and is under club control for three more years).

What would really be great is if they could acquire the Pestano equivalent as a starting pitcher.

That’s “really hard,” Angels general manager Jerry Dipoto said.

“The idea that you can make the perfect acquisition for your rotation in August is not great, but there are going to be available options. We just have to determine what the right timing is, or if we need one.”

The Angels currently have Tyler Skaggs nursing a forearm strain that will put him out an indefinite amount of time and C.J. Wilson holding a 12.50 ERA in five starts leading up to tonight’s Freeway Series finale. That leaves their rotation very vulnerable, with Hector Santiago and Matt Shoemaker being counted on to step up in support of Jered Weaver and Garrett Richards, and very little available to them in their Minor League system.

Dipoto pointed out that left-hander Wade LeBlanc, reacquired on June 17, has been pitching well at Triple-A Salt Lake, where he has a 4.04 ERA in 18 starts. Chris Volstad is also there, with a 5.18 ERA in four starts. But the Angels — with money available — will continue to monitor the waiver wire in hopes of landing additional starting pitching depth.

“Unfortunately, we don’t have the household name sitting in the 7 hole right now,” Dipoto said. “I don’t know that anyone really does. That’s what august waiver are for. That’s what our minor league system is for.”

It’s Mike Trout‘s 23rd birthday, in case you hadn’t heard. Here’s what he said about that pregame …

  • His best gift? “Nothing too crazy for my birthday. I got Cornhole. I played it over the All-Star break and I liked it. Parents got it. My mom’s brother builds them and he sent me one. Other than that, I don’t need gifts.”
  • Trout has homered in each of his last two games on his birthday. Pressure to hit one tonight? “Nah, no pressure to do so. If I hit one tonight, I hit one.”
  • Do you feel old? “Everyone keeps asking me that. I was talking to [Jered Weaver] about it, looking at how much time I have up here. After this year, over three years. It’s been quick. I’m having fun here; this is where you want to be. I can’t ask for anything else.”

And the lineups for tonight’s Freeway Series finale …

Dodgers (65-50)

Justin Turner, 2B
Yasiel Puig, CF
Adrian Gonzalez, 1B
Hanley Ramirez, DH
Matt Kemp, RF
Scott Van Slyke, LF
Juan Uribe, 3B
A.J. Ellis, C
Miguel Rojas, SS

SP: LH Hyun-Jin Ryu (12-5, 3.39 ERA)

Angels (67-46)

Erick Aybar, SS
Trout, CF
Albert Pujols, DH
Josh Hamilton, LF
Howie Kendrick, 2B
David Freese, 3B
Chris Iannetta, C
C.J. Cron, 1B
Collin Cowgill, RF

SP: LH C.J. Wilson (8-7, 4.74 ERA)

Alden

Can the Angels ‘respond’ to the aggressive A’s? …

Arte Moreno, Jerry DipotoI asked Jerry Dipoto recently about watching the A’s, not just where they’re at in the standings but what moves they make, and how that affects whether the Angels win the division or have to play for one of those do-or-die Wild Card spots. He said they have to focus on what’s best for them, and that if you try to react to other teams and get wrapped up in a game of scenarios, “you’ll talk yourself into bad decisions.”

Fair enough.

But the A’s just got Jon Lester. It was the ultimate “win-now” move, sending fan favorite Yoenis Cespedes to the Red Sox in exchange and bringing former fan favorite Jonny Gomes back. Now Lester — three-time All-Star, big-time postseason performer — joins a rotation that includes recent addition Jeff Samardzija along with Sonny Gray, Scott Kazmir and Jesse Chavez.

The A’s have better starting pitching than the Angels (that almost goes without saying). They also have a better record (leading by 2 1/2 games when play began on Thursday). On top of that, they have a far more favorable schedule (I went into that here). And the last thing the Angels want is for their season — a great season, with the second-best record in baseball, amid an ever-shrinking championship window — to come down to one elimination game because they had to settle for the Wild Card.

But here’s the problem: It would be really hard for the Angels to “react” to the aggressive A’s, even if they wanted to.

Lester going to Oakland won’t magically inject the Angels’ farm system with a bevy of prospects necessary to get a top-of-the-rotation starter. They just don’t have it. What little they had was sent to San Diego in exchange for closer Huston Street. Prior to getting Street, the Angels checked in on David Price (again), and they tried to acquire teammate Ian Kennedy. And the message they received was clear: Their farm system isn’t getting them a major rotation upgrade. So, they went the bullpen route, and created one of the best relief corps in baseball.

It seems there are only two ways for the Angels to truly beef up their rotation …

1. If they want to do it before 4 p.m. ET, they’d have to part ways with Major League players. Asked about that late last week, Dipoto said, “I don’t want to break up this group.” That, of course, was before the A’s traded for Lester. Maybe he changes his mind on this; but that remains doubtful.

2. Wait until August. And this is a legitimate possibility, because the Angels have money left over (they’re somewhere between $10 and $15 million under the luxury-tax threshold, if my math is correct) but don’t want to give up more prospects from a thin farm system they’re trying to cultivate. The former plays in August, when teams can put in claims on anybody who goes through waivers and players can’t be traded unless they clear; the ladder, not so much.

So this is where the Angels stand moving forward. Tonight, they’ll play another game against another contender, and they’ll try to avoid a sweep from Oriole Park at Camden Yards. They can look forward to the possibility of C.J. Wilson likely rejoining the rotation by Saturday, and hope that he’s fixed whatever it was that caused him to give up 19 runs in 16 2/3 innings from June 24 to July 9.

And that, still, may be the best acquisition they make.

Alden

Scioscia wouldn’t change playoff format …

Mike SciosciaA lot of season remains and a lot can still happen, but if the schedule ended today, the Angels would easily have the second-best record in the Majors – they were five games better than the third-place Tigers when play began Tuesday – and still their season would come down to one game.

It’s the misfortune that comes with playing in the same division as baseball’s best team – the A’s, who the Angels trail by 1 1/2 games – and it’s the bad timing of playing in an era with two Wild Card teams in each league.

Angels manager Mike Scioscia has long been a proponent of divisional play, believing teams that win their division should have clear advantages over those that make the playoffs as a Wild Card. And the fact that his club is on the other side of that isn’t making him change his stance.

“I think the weight that is on winning a division is warranted,” Scioscia said prior to the series opener from Oriole Park at Camden Yards. “I think that if you’re going to have divisional baseball, you have to really make winning a division the first objective of any team that’s contending. And if you don’t quite reach that goal, and you play well enough, then you have the opportunity to work your way into the playoffs.”

One alternative to a team running into the scenario the Angels are currently in is to extend the Wild Card into a three-game series, but Scioscia said that would penalize the division winners because “you will lose your edge, no doubt about it, with that much time off.”

Another would be to eliminate divisional play, which the Angels’ long-time skipper doesn’t like. And a more unconventional one would be to have four divisions, something Scioscia floated out as a possibility if more expansion takes place.

The ladder isn’t necessarily feasible right now, which makes the current goal pretty simple.

“Win your division,” Scioscia said. “Let’s just put it that way.”

Some notes from today …

  • C.J. Wilson gave up two runs in 5 1/3 innings in a rehab start for Double-A Arkansas on Monday, scattering four hits, waling two and striking out seven. His ankle feels good, and he should be lined up to start this weekend in St. Petersburg, Fla., but Scioscia wants to wait until Wilson gets through his bullpen to make any determinations. Wilson also discovered some tightness in his left hip that was limiting a flexibility, a problem he fixed and an issue he believes will get him back on track.
  • Josh Hamilton moved from left field to designated hitter, but it wasn’t injury related. Hamilton didn’t get much sleep while flying to North Carolina to deal with a family emergency in his native North Carolina.
  • Grant Green (lower back) and Collin Cowgill (thumb, nose) stayed in Arizona rehabbing.
  • Mike Trout is currently in Baltimore, which is about a two-hour drive from his hometown of Millville, N.J., but he doesn’t expect a huge crowd. Trout said he left like 15 tickets.

Lineup …

Kole Calhoun, RF
Trout, CF
Albert Pujols, 1B
Hamilton, LF
Erick Aybar, SS
Howie Kendrick, 2B
Efren Navarro, DH
David Freese, 3B
Hank Conger, C

SP: RH Jered Weaver (11-6, 3.36 ERA)

Alden

Wade LeBlanc DFA’d; Jarrett Grube called up …

Angels left-hander Wade LeBlanc was designated for assignment on Saturday, one day after a bullpen-saving performance in a 9-5 loss to the A’s, and called up right-hander Jarrett Grube to take his place on the roster.

LeBlanc, out of options, gave up four runs in 6 1/3 innings on Friday night in relief of Garrett Richards, who allowed five runs before recording the third out of the first inning. Now the Angels risk losing LeBlanc off waivers, unable to send him back down to Triple-A unless 29 other teams pass up a chance to acquire him.

Grube, 32, has a 3.52 ERA in 11 starts for Triple-A Salt Lake, posting a 1.14 WHIP and a 2.83 strikeout-to-walk ratio in 61 1/3 innings. In the Major Leagues for the first time, Grube was a 10th-round Draft pick by the Rockies in 2004, spent half a season in independent ball, was in the Mariners organization two years and was acquired by the Angels as a Minor League in July 2012.

Grube has a 4.14 ERA, a 1.14 WHIP and a 2.83 strikeout-to-walk ratio in his professional career.

It’s a tough break for LeBlanc — and may end up being a tough break to the Angels if they lose him — but he was basically out of commission to the Angels for the next four days because he threw 94 pitches. The Angels could’ve tried to bide their time with a six-man bullpen until then, especially since they’re off on Monday and are pushing back Matt Shoemaker (starting C.J. Wilson, Garrett Richards and Tyler Skaggs, respectively, in the three-game Houston series from Monday to Wednesday).

But apparently felt they needed that extra length right away.

Alden

Scioscia: Feldman ‘was working slow’ …

Scott FeldmanAngels manager Mike Scioscia felt Astros starter Scott Feldman may have been taking a little too long between pitches while throwing seven innings of one-run ball against the Angels on Saturday, though he doesn’t believe his pace was ultimately an issue.

“He’s certainly more deliberate,” Scioscia said. “And the umpires were aware of it. I don’t think there was an issue. It seemed like there was a lot of miscommunication with the catcher, and we looked at the catcher and definitely he was shaking a lot of signs off.”

Rule 8.04 states that when bases are empty “the pitcher shall deliver the ball to the batter within 12 seconds after he receives the ball.” Each time the pitcher goes over the allotted time, a ball is supposed to be called.

That rule, however, is rarely enforced. And when guys are on base, pitchers can take as long as they’d like.

Chris Guccione, the home-plate umpire, he tried to keep it going as best he could,” Scioscia said. “I think you’re going to have those times. He was working slow, no doubt about it.”

The Angels have seen Feldman a lot from his time with the Rangers, from 2005-12, and know he’s among the pitchers who usually takes a while. C.J. Wilson, who starts Monday’s series finale for the Angels, is similar.

Did Feldman’s pace affect the Angels hitters in Saturday’s 7-4 loss?

“I think if guys let it become a distraction, it could,” Scioscia said. “But I don’t think it was an issue.”

Here’s the Angels lineup, with David Freese sitting against a tough right-hander …

Angels (2-4)

Kole Calhoun, RF
Mike Trout, CF
Albert Pujols, 1B
Josh Hamilton, DH
Raul Ibanez, LF
Howie Kendrick, 2B
Ian Stewart, 3B
Chris Iannetta, C
Erick Aybar, SS

SP: LH Wilson (0-1, 9.53 ERA)

Astros (3-3)

Jonathan Villar, SS
Robbie Grossman, CF
Jose Altuve, 2B
Jason Castro, DH
Jesus Guzman, LF
Chris Carter, 1B
Matt Dominguez, 3B
Carlos Corporan, C
L.J. Hoes, RF

SP: RH Jarred Cosart (1-0, 0.00 ERA)

Alden

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