Results tagged ‘ Albert Pujols ’

How many All-Stars are on the Angels? …

The Angels passed the halfway point of their season on Tuesday, and did so emphatically with their first doubleheader sweep since 2009.

It’s perhaps as good a time as any to see how many All-Stars they have.

They produced their most All-Stars in 1979, when Rod Carew, Bobby Grich, Brian Downing, Don Baylor, Nolan Ryan and Mark Clear were all chosen for the Midsummer Classic. They probably won’t have that many going to Target Field this year, but they’ll have a few. Below are some names worth mentioning, with statistical comps to those who play their positions in the American League (I excluded Josh Hamilton because he missed so much time) …

OF Mike Trout

BA: .315 (T-1st)
OBP: .410 (2nd)
SLG: .617 (1st)
WAR: 5.0 (1st)
HR: 19 (2nd)
SB: 10 (12th)

Chances: He’s a sure thing. Trout ranks second in the AL in fan votes, trailing only Jose Bautista and already notching more than 4 million, and will start his second straight All-Star Game at 22 years old.

1B Albert Pujols

BA: .257 (8th)
OBP: .312 (10th)
SLG: .467 (6th)
HR: 17 (4th)
WAR: 1.5 (7th)

Chances: He looked like an All-Star again in April, but has dropped off ever since and now there are a handful of other first basemen putting up better numbers. His reputation will have to carry him. If it doesn’t, it will be three straight All-Star Game absences for Pujols.

SS Erick Aybar

BA: .277 (4th)
OBP: .316 (9th)
SLG: .419 (2nd)
HR: 4 (T-4th)
SB: 8 (6th)
WAR: 2.9 (1st)

Chances: Tough to say. Aybar has had a terrific first half, but Derek Jeter is going to start his final All-Star Game, and Aybar typically loses the popularity contests. Alexei Ramirez is also deserving.

SP Garrett Richards

ERA: 2.81 (8th)
WHIP: 1.07 (5th)
W: 9 (T-5th)
SO: 108 (8th)
IP: 109 (14th)

Chances: In my opinion, he should. But like Aybar, he’s just not as big a name — yet. I still think Richards finds a way onto the staff, especially when you consider that so many pitchers back out every year. Winning AL Player of the Month for June wouldn’t hurt, either.

SP Jered Weaver

ERA: 3.56 (20th)
WHIP: 1.16 (T-9th)
W: 9 (T-5th)
SO: 92 (T-12th)
IP: 116 1/3 (5th)

Chances: Like Pujols, he’ll need his track record to carry him to his fourth All-Star Game. Solid year so far, but by no means great.

Alden

Early on, Pujols learned from Gwynn …

gwynnAlbert Pujols used to have this videotape of Tony Gwynn conducting a hitting clinic in the late 1990s. The Angels’ first baseman was at Maple Woods Community College in Kansas City then, still striving to be the hitter who would establish himself as one of the greatest ever, and Gwynn was well on his way to a Hall of Fame career. So Pujols popped that tape in frequently, hoping to learn as much as he could from a master at his craft.

“I took a lot of notes off that,” Pujols said Monday, the day Gwynn lost his multiyear battle to salivary gland cancer at the age of 54.

“It’s a sad day,” Pujols added. “Not just for myself, because I got to know him over the years, but for baseball. We lost a great man at a young age.”

Pujols’ first year with the Cardinals – 2001 – was Gwynn’s last with the Padres, and Pujols got to be Gwynn’s teammate during his final All-Star Game at Safeco Field in Seattle that summer. Nearly two months later, when the Padres and Cardinals met for their first regular-season meeting, Pujols finally struck up the nerve to tell Gwynn about those videotapes.

But he never really talked to him about hitting.

“I wasn’t that comfortable my first year in the league,” Pujols said. “But he was always open to help all the young players.”

Gwynn went down as one of the greatest hitters of all time, a guy who compiled 3,141 hits, sported a lifetime batting average of .338, won eight National League batting titles and never struck out more than 40 times in one season.

“A legend,” Pujols said. “Just an unbelievable hitter. But I think for me, he was a better person, with everything that he accomplished in the game versus off the field. What he’s done, and what he did through his career in San Diego, it speaks for itself.”

Angels (37-31)

Kole Calhoun, RF
Mike Trout, CF
Albert Pujols, 1B
Josh Hamilton, LF
David Freese, 3B
Howie Kendrick, 2B
Raul Ibanez, DH
Chris Iannetta, C
John McDonald, SS

SP: RH Jered Weaver (7-5, 3.51 ERA)

Indians (35-35)

Michael Bourn, CF
Asdrubal Cabrera, SS
Michael Brantley, LF
Jason Kipnis, 2B
Carlos Santana, DH
Lonnie Chisenhall, 3B
Nick Swisher, 1B
David Murphy, RF
George Kottaras, C

SP: RH Trevor Bauer (1-3, 4.24 ERA)

Alden

Takeaways from a 14-inning thriller …

Collin CowgillTuesday night’s game will be remembered mostly for Collin Cowgill‘s walk-off homer, which set up the Angels’ fifth straight win and put them 2 1/2 games back in the American League West, and for Yoenis Cespdes‘ throw, one of the best anybody has ever seen. But here are some other takeaways from one of the most interesting games of the season …

  • This was the Angels’ best pitching performance of the year. Hector Santiago provided six scoreless innings in his return from Triple-A Salt Lake, scattering three hits while walking one and striking out eight. Then, six relievers (Kevin Jepsen, Mike Morin, Joe Smith, Cam Bedrosian, Fernando Salas and Cory Rasmus) combined to give up one run in eight innings, scattering five hits, walking two and striking out six, going toe-to-toe with an A’s bullpen that ranks third in the Majors in relief-pitcher WHIP.
  • The Angels, as Mike Scioscia said, “were fortunate tonight.” They made two critical baserunning blunders, with Albert Pujols running through a Gary DiSarcina stop sign in the sixth to easily get thrown out at home by Brandon Moss, and Kole Calhoun trying to advance to third in the 11th on a ground ball to shortstop Jed Lowrie, who flipped to Josh Donaldson for the easy out.
  • Scioscia made a questionable decision to have Calhoun bunt in the 13th, after Mike Trout drew a leadoff walk. Calhoun did his job, which meant Trout advanced to second, but with first base open, the A’s opted to walk Josh Hamilton (even though they had a lefty, Jeff Francis, pitching). The sac bunt took the bat out of the hands of one of the Angels’ best players, and paved the way for an inning-ending double play from David Freese.
  • The Angels and A’s play a lot of extra innings. In five matchups between the two at Angel Stadium, they’ve now gone to extra innings three times. That, in addition to the 19-inning game played in Oakland on April 29 of last year.

Alden

Calhoun finds his mojo at the leadoff spot …

Kole CalhounKole Calhoun‘s return to the leadoff spot was merely a byproduct of Albert Pujols missing his first game of the season.

But it may have gotten him going nonetheless.

Calhoun entered Thursday’s game 1-for-19 since coming off a six-week rehabilitation from a sprained right ankle, then went 2-for-4 in the 7-5 win over the Mariners, hitting a double, drawing two walks and scoring three runs. The 26-year-old right fielder believes returning to the leadoff spot played a part in feeling better than he has at the plate since coming off the DL, becuase it forced him to take pitches and be more patient.

“Your typical leadoff hitter is going to try to get on base, let these guys know what the starting pitcher has, especially early in the game,” Calhoun said. “I saw six pitches my first at-bat, laid off some close ones in my second and third at-bats. That’s something personally I need to do, and it’s good for the team. I set the table and had a good night.”

Calhoun entered the season as the team’s leadoff hitter, and hit there for 11 of his first 14 games.

Asked if he’ll continue to ride Calhoun at the leadoff spot, Angels manager Mike Scioscia said: “I think we’ll mix and match a little bit. He did a good job tonight. When he gets comfortable, we talked about him hitting at the top. Against leftie,s we got some guys who are doing a pretty good job getting on base, too. We’ll have some options.”

Translation: Calhoun may actually sit over the next two games, as the A’s start the series with lefties Drew Pomeranz and Tommy Milone. Calhoun has hit lefties well in his career, but Scioscia has been going with Grant Green and Collin Cowgill in the outfield corners in those situations.

Alden

For the first time in 2014, Pujols sits …

Albert PujolsAlbert Pujols won’t be playing in 162 games this season. Angels manager Mike Scioscia made sure of that on Wednesday, when he told his superstar first baseman he’d be sitting for the first time in Thursday’s series finale at Safeco Field and didn’t let Pujols talk his way out of it.

He tried though.

“Yeah, but they said no,” Pujols admitted, laughing. “They don’t even want me to hit. I’m just going to go to the cage just to get loose. I’m not taking batting practice, either.”

The primary goal – more so than having him in the lineup for every game – is to make sure they keep Pujols fresh throughout the season, especially after he missed the last two months of 2013 with a partial tear of his left plantar fascia. Pujols said his lower half is “good” and “better than it was on the last road trip,” when the hard turf at Rogers Centre took its toll on the 34-year-old.

Scioscia wanted to give Pujols the day off “just to get him to recharge.”

“Albert will go out and play till the cows come home,” Scioscia added. “It’s time for him to take a day today.”

Pujols is batting .262 with a team-leading 14 homers, but his production has dipped over the last month or so, with a .236/.298/.445 slash line, five homers and 19 strikeouts in his last 28 games. In his last at-bat against Felix Hernandez on Wednesday night, though, Pujols stayed back on a 93-mph fastball and drove it to right field for a two-out RBI double in the ninth.

“It was middle-out, and that was a ball I was pulling a little bit,” said Pujols, who has started at designated hitter 11 times this year. “I was able to stay through it. Hopefully I can take it to the next series, and hopefully I get an opportunity to play tonight.”

  • Josh Hamilton was slated to take live batting practice on the field Thursday, and if that went well, he’d re-start his rehab assignment with Triple-A Tacoma on Friday. Scioscia is hopeful that Hamilton will return before the end of this road trip (Thursday in Houston).
  • Dane De La Rosa (right s/c joint irritation) appeared in back-to-back outings for Triple-A Salt Lake for the first time on Wednesday and Thursday, giving up a run in each one-inning outing. He isn’t ready to join the Angels just yet. Scioscia said his “stuff looked good,” but he’s “slowly making progress” and “to get the confidence to know he’s where he needs to be might take a couple more outings.”
  • Grant Green (.388/.404/.510) started over Collin Cowgill because, frankly, Scioscia wants to get him as many at-bats as possible since he’s swinging the bat so well (full lineup here).
  • Also, Kole Calhoun is back at leadoff. Scioscia: “With Albert out, we definitely want Mike [Trout] third. If you look at his ability to work counts, even though obviously he hasn’t been locked in since he came off the DL, I think hell be a positive in the leadoff spot, and with Erick [Aybar] in there, it will give us a good look before the heart of our lineup.”

Alden

Mike Trout ‘probably’ won’t do Derby …

Gary DiSarcina, Mike TroutMike Trout, the leading vote-getting in the American League as of Tuesday, looks primed to go to his third All-Star Game in as many years. But the superstar center fielder once again sounds reluctant to partake in the Home Run Derby, saying Tuesday that he “probably” wouldn’t if asked.

“I don’t know if I’d do it,” Trout said. “I don’t think [Mike] Scioscia would want me to do it.”

Trout is correct on that.

The Angels’ manager said participating is “totally a player’s decision, and it should be.” But his stance on the event hasn’t changed.

“I don’t like it,” Scioscia said. “I think it has great fan interest; I even like watching it. But when it’s one of your players doing it, not a fan. I don’t know if a player ever takes that many full-gorilla swings in that short of a time. It’s like a long-drive contest for a golfer who has to go out there and rely on touch. I don’t think they would like that.”

Scioscia’s outlook on the Home Run Derby is the opposite as that of Albert Pujols, who took part in the event in ’03, ’07 and ’09, and has never struggled in the second half because of it.

“For guys that haven’t done it, I encourage them to do it at least once,” Pujols, sporting a team-leading 14 homers, said in late April. “It’s awesome. It’s a good time. And you put on a good show for the fans. That’s what you do it for.”

Trout took part in a home-run derby while at the lower Class A level and said it “didn’t turn out too well.”

“I hit like two or three home runs,” Trout said, but he doesn’t believe it messed up his swing.

“I didn’t think about it much,” he added. “It’s for the fans, to have fun and try to hit some home runs. After the All-Star break, you get back to the basics anyways.”

Scioscia has had four of his players participate in the Home Run Derby since he took over as Angels manager in 2000, and two of them actually won.

In ’01, Troy Glaus was shutout at Safeco Field, then had a higher OPS in the second half (.922) than in the first (.877).

In ’03, Garret Anderson won, but had a lower OPS in the second half (.807) than in the first (.943).

In ’07, Vladimir Guerrero won and stayed at about the same pace (.962 OPS in the first half, .935 OPS in the second half).

In ’12, Mark Trumbo finished third in the Derby and slumped the rest of the way, going from a first-half OPS of .965 to a second-half OPS of .630.

Scioscia let them take part, but only begrudgingly.

“I would advise any one of our guys not to do it, just for the wear and tear it takes on your whole swing,” Scioscia said. “I enjoy watching it. It’s great fan interest. But let the other guys in the league do it.”

Alden

C.J. Cron, Grant Green or Ian Stewart? …

Grant GreenJosh Hamilton should return soon — recent setback notwithstanding — and at that point the Angels will have an interesting decision in front of them.

Ultimately, it could come down to the following three guys for one roster spot …

C.J. Cron
Grant Green
Ian Stewart

It looks like Raul Ibanez‘s job is safe, partly because keeping him on the roster is the best way for the Angels to preserve their depth. Cron, Green and Stewart (still on the disabled list, but on track to be activated shortly after Hamilton) can all be optioned to the Minor Leagues. So it looks like it’ll come down to whom the Angels believe will benefit them most initially (I say “initially” because guys are sent down and called up all the time). Below is a look at what each brings, and doesn’t …

Cron

Stats: .283/.298/.478, 47 PA in MLB; .319/.369/.602, 122 PA in AAA
Benefits: A right-handed bat who can platoon with the left-handed-hitting Ibanez at designated hitter, and a natural first baseman — the only one on the roster — who can occasionally spell Albert Pujols.
Drawbacks: Cron still has some developing to do, and came up a little earlier than projected. In my opinion, he should only be up here if he’s going to get consistent at-bats. I’m not sure that would be the case with the Angels at full strength.

Green

Stats: .357/.378/.476, 45 PA in MLB; .349/.395/.505, 119 PA in AAA
Benefits: Versatility. Green is a natural shortstop who is most comfortable at second base and has gotten a lot more comfortable at third base and left field since being acquired by the Angels last July. For the last few days, he’s been getting a lot of early work at first base, too. And that could be big given what I mentioned above regarding Cron.
Drawbacks: It’s a right-handed bat for a bench that on most nights will probably have the right-handed-hitting Collin Cowgill available. Green has been much better against lefties (.935 OPS in 23 plate appearances) than righties (.768 in 22 plate appearances) during his stint in the big leagues. Still a small sample size, though.

Stewart

Stats: .176/.222/.382, 72 PA in MLB
Benefits: Stewart made the team out of Spring Training because on the nights Ibanez starts — and initially it was going to be almost all them — Mike Scioscia has a power left-handed bat off the bench. The fact Stewart can give David Freese a day off against a tough righty, while playing second and first base in an emergency situation, was also a benefit.
Drawbacks: Stewart’s performance hasn’t helped him, especially given how well Cron and Green have hit since coming up. He’s struck out 31 times in 24 games, but is working on getting his hands a little lower to shorten his swing path and hopefully cut those down.

So, which one would you pick? …

Alden

Decisions loom, but Ibanez probably safe …

Raul Ibanez, Yan GomesThe Angels will have a lot of interesting decisions to make in the next few days, but it appears Raul Ibanez’s standing on the roster will not be one of them.

Jerry Dipoto wouldn’t flat out say that the veteran designated hitter will not be released, but the Angels’ general manager did indicate that the club would continue to be patient with Ibanez – because he turned things around after a slow start last year, because they like his veteran presence, because he’s come through in late-game situations and because keeping him on the roster allows the organization to preserve depth.

“One of the real benefits about where we’re at right now is just the fact that we have unmasked some depth, and once you start peeling depth away, it’s not there anymore,” Dipoto said. “Raul has a track record. He has done this before. He has gone through cold spells, and he has gotten hot. There’s nobody here who believes Raul has had his last good days in the big leagues.”

The Angels’ current dilemma, no doubt, is a good one.

Efren Navarro, Grant Green, C.J. Cron and Luis Jimenez have come up from Triple-A and contributed in the last few weeks, and now several key position players are on the verge of being activated off the disabled list.

Third baseman David Freese (non-displaced fracture in right middle finger) and right fielder Kole Calhoun (sprained right ankle) are deep into a rehab assignment with Triple-A Salt Lake and could be back within the next couple days.

That would presumably lead to Jimenez (a right-handed-hitting third baseman) and Navarro (a left-handed hitter currently playing corner outfield) getting optioned.

But next week, when left fielder Josh Hamilton (sprained left thumb) and third baseman Ian Stewart (left hand contusion) are projected to return, is when things could get interesting.

The Angels would then perceivably have to make a decision between Green, a right-handed hitter who can play up to four different positions, and Cron, the slugging prospect who can spell Albert Pujols by playing first base and can be a right-handed-hitting complement to Ibanez at DH.

Stewart, who has batted .176 and struck out 31 times in 24 games, can be optioned to Triple-A.

“We’re finally seeing the light at the end of the tunnel in getting guys back,” Dipoto said. “And the guys who have come up and chipped in have done such a great job that it makes it tough to have conversations. But my goodness, when you look at the way the roster has been stacked, it’s been fun.”

Ibanez, 41, has a .148/.268/.269 slash line in his first 36 games, but he posted only a .511 OPS in April last year and then turned it around shortly thereafter, with a 1.031 OPS in May. The Angels believe he can do the same now.

“To be fair, you bring a guy in, you remain patient with him, you give him his opportunity,” Dipoto said. “Raul wasn’t brought in to jam into the 4-hole and hit cleanup for a month. It hadn’t been a great six weeks for him. We’ll get him where he needs to be.”

Alden

Hamilton hits on the field, headed to Arizona …

Dodgers Angels BaseballJosh Hamilton hit on the field for the first time since tearing a ligament in his left thumb on Wednesday, swinging with one hand as he took side and front tosses from interim hitting coach Paul Sorrento.

Next, he’ll go to Arizona, where he’ll hit off a tee with both hands and play catch on Friday.

Hamilton hopes to take live batting practice when the Angels return from a six-game road trip through Toronto and Philadelphia on May 15, and he hopes to return to the starting lineup for the home series against the Royals from May 23-25 – six and a half weeks since Hamilton hurt his thumb while sliding headfirst into first base in Seattle.

Hamilton had been doing drills with his bottom hand in recent days, but asked to do them outside so he could make sure he continues to stay in the middle of the field.

The silver lining in all this is that it’s Hamilton’s left thumb that’s injured, not his right.

“The top hand helps guide when you go through, but still your bottom hand leads,” Hamilton said. “If I’m getting in good position here, then I know when I put my top one back on I’m going to be all right.”

Angels manager Mike Scioscia has used five different cleanup hitters behind Albert Pujols since Hamilton went down on April 8. Raul Ibanez has hit there 12 times, Howie Kendrick has hit there nine times (including Wednesday), Ian Stewart twice, and David Freese and C.J. Cron have started one game apiece in the No. 4 spot.

With Hamilton playing in only eight of the team’s first 32 games, the Angels are 14th in the Majors in OPS from the cleanup spot.

“We’ve had to do a lot of mixing and matching in the lineup,” Scioscia said. “That big presence behind Albert is something we’re searching for more.”

Some more injury notes …

  • Scioscia said it’s “a strong possibility” that Dane De La Rosa (right s/c joint irritation) joins the Angels on its next road trip, but he’ll need at least one more rehab outing.
  • It’s also “very possible” that Sean Burnett (recovery from August elbow surgery) ventures out on a rehab assignment next, after completing yet another extended spring outing in Arizona on Wednesday.
  • Kole Calhoun (sprained right ankle) ran on the field pretty close to full intensity on Wednesday and will join Hamilton in Arizona over the weekend. He hopes to start a rehab assignment at the four-week mark, which would be Tuesday.
  • Joe Smith (tightness in lower right side) is “doing much better, and we’ll see how he does in pregame.” He may be available tonight, if needed.

Yankees (17-15)

Jacoby Ellsbury, CF
Derek Jeter, SS
Carlos Beltran, RF
Mark Teixeira, 1B
Alfonso Soriano, DH
Yangervis Solarte, 3B
Brett Gardner, LF
Brian Roberts, 2B
John Ryan Murphy, C

SP: LH Vidal Nuno (0-0, 6.87 ERA)

Angels (16-16)

Collin Cowgill, RF
Mike Trout, CF
Pujols, 1B
Kendrick, 2B
Cron, DH
Erick Aybar, SS
Chris Iannetta, C
Grant Green, LF
John McDonald, 3B

SP: LH Hector Santiago (0-5, 5.01 ERA)

Alden

Cron, Jimenez up; Freese to DL, Shuck sent down …

C.J. CronThe Angels couldn’t wait on David Freese’s finger to heal without utilizing his roster spot, so they placed the veteran third baseman on the 15-day disabled list prior to Saturday’s game against the Rangers.

And then they shook up the roster.

Up is power-hitting prospect C.J. Cron, who’s ranked third in the Angels’ system by MLB.com and will make his Major League debut as the designated hitter in the No. 5 spot of the lineup.

Joining him is third baseman Luis Jimenez, who hit .264 in 34 games with the Angels last year.

Sent down to Triple-A is outfielder J.B. Shuck, the scrappy left-handed hitter who was batting .173 in his first 19 games.

“I feel we do need more right-handed infield depth with David out,” Angels manager Mike Scioscia said, “and we definitely feel that J.B. can benefit from going down there and just figuring some things out.”

The Angels cleared a spot on the 40-man for Cron by outrighting reliever Yoslan Herrera off the 40-man roster, three days after optioning him to Triple-A. They then opened spots for Cron and Jimenez on the active, 25-man roster by sending Shuck down and placing Freese on the DL.

Freese suffered a small, non-displaced fracture in his right middle finger after getting hit by a fastball from Rangers starter Colby Lewis on Friday, but said Saturday that he’s “pretty confident” he can be ready at or around the time he’s eligible to be activated (May 18).

In the meantime, the right-handed-hitting Jimenez and the left-handed-hitting Ian Stewart figure to platoon at third base, with Jimenez batting eighth against left-hander Matt Harrison on Saturday. Grant Green batted ninth while making his Major League debut in left field, a position he figures to get most of his playing time at moving forward.

Cron, meanwhile, gives the Angels a right-handed-hitting option at DH and can also play some first base if Albert Pujols needs a day off his feet. The left-handed-hitting Raul Ibanez – with a .149/.221/.299 slash line in his first 26 games – will be an option at DH and left field.

In short, the lineup – a lineup that’s also without corner outfielders Josh Hamilton and Kole Calhoun – will change frequently.

“C.J. had a terrific spring for us,” Scioscia said of Cron. “I think he’s really found a comfort level the last couple years he’s played, had a great Fall League and spring-boarded it to a terrific Spring Training. He’s off to a great start [in Triple-A] and hopefully he’s going to give us a little boost right now because, especially with David being out, we have a right-handed void.”

Cron posted a 1.167 OPS in the Arizona Fall League, batted .292 in 12 Spring Training games and had a .319/.369/.602 slash line in his first 20 games in the Pacific Coast League.

After Friday night’s game in Salt Lake City, Utah, the 24-year-old got called into the office and saw manager Keith Johnson and director of player development Bobby Scales standing stoically. Scales told Cron his times to first base were a little slow and that he needed to work on it, to which Cron replied with “Yes, sir.” Then they started cracking up, and Johnson broke the news.

“It was really cool,” Cron said. “I didn’t really know what to expect, honestly. It was really early in the season. But I was pleasantly surprised.”

Alden

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