Results tagged ‘ Albert Pujols ’

Trout arrives, focused on a title …

troutMike Trout arrived to Arizona late Sunday night. On Monday, he shot an all-day commercial for Nike. On Tuesday, he shot an all-day commercial with Clayton Kershaw for Subway. On Wednesday, about 30 media members congregated at the warning track in right field to hear the reigning American League Most Valuable Player speak publicly for the first time in 2015.

In case you hadn’t noticed, Trout is a bona fide superstar.

“It’s crazy,” Trout said, “but it comes along with it. I’m having fun with it. I’m not taking it for granted, putting on a uniform. I’m always coming to the ballpark having fun. It’s a little different, going out in restaurants and stuff like that, getting noticed a little bit more. But I’m having fun with it.”

Trout posted a .287/.377/.561 slash line with 36 homers and an AL-leading 111 RBIs and 115 runs scored while becoming the youngest unanimous \MVP in baseball history. But his stolen-base total dipped to 16 and his strikeouts rose to an AL-leading 184, the most ever by an MVP.

“It’s plain and simple, I was chasing the high pitch,” Trout said of his punchouts. “Everybody knows that. There’s things you can work on, but the majority of the time, they’re balls, and I was just chasing them. I don’t really go into video. I don’t like over analyzing my swing. I just like going out there and doing stuff that helps me work on things in the cage and in BP, and during the games, just go out and hit.”

Trout, who stole 82 bases from 2012-13, said it’s “definitely” a goal to swipe more bags in 2015.

“That’s another thing,” he said. “Just trying to run more. I haven’t talked to [manager Mike Scioscia] or Dino [Ebel, the bench coach,] but they’re probably on board with it, trying to get me to second as much as I can. … They were doing a good job of holding me on. It’s going to be a challenge.”

There’s a chance Trout could move into the No. 3 spot this season — something that may only be possible if Josh Hamilton is healthy and productive — but the 23-year-old said he doesn’t care where he hits. Trout called being swept by the Royals in the AL Division Series a “terrible feeling” and admitted to putting a little added pressure on himself in October, which saw him go 1-for-12 with a home run.

Trout called Howie Kendrick “a big loss,” but likes how the team looks.

“We’re looking to win,” Trout said. “We have the core group, besides Howie, and Josh is banged up a little bit. But other than that, we’re going to try to win some ballgames and get after it.”

Trout did a lot of hunting and a lot of fishing over the offseason — the funnest thing was snatching a few barracudas in the Bahamas — and said “this is probably the best I’ve ever felt, coming into Spring Training.” He came in weighing 239, two pounds more than he finished the season at.

He’s attained almost everything possible at a very young age, but he’s still motivated.

“Putting on a uniform every day and competing since I was a kid, that motivates me,” Trout said. “And just trying to win a championship. If that don’t motivate you, you’re in the wrong sport. You want that ring. Having fun. That’s the biggest thing. Just having fun.”

Alden

Richards looks ‘outstanding’ in third bullpen …

Garrett Richards completed his third bullpen session on Monday morning, throwing 40 pitches – four-seam fastballs and two-seam fastballs – from the stretch at the Angels’ Spring Training complex.

“Outstanding,” Angels pitching coach Mike Butcher said. “He looked really good.”

Richards is full weight-bearing on his surgically repaired left knee, but Angels manager Mike Scioscia said he’s still about 10 days away from taking part in pitchers’ fielding practice and won’t be close to pitching in Cactus League games the first time through the rotation.

Before doing that, Richards still needs to throw from the windup, still needs to work on fielding his position, still needs to incorporate his off-speed pitches and still needs to face hitters in a controlled environment.

“There’s a progression that a pitcher needs to do to get ready for a season,” Scioscia said. “He’s not in that progression to get ready for a season. He’s still in rehab mode, so we’ll see how that goes.”

Some additional notes from Monday’s workout …

  • Josh Rutledge, Johnny Giavotella, Taylor Featherston and Grant Green are competing for jobs as the starting second baseman and utility infielder, but the Angels are very open to the possibility of carrying three of them on the Opening Day roster.
  • Drew Butera, in competition for the job as backup catcher, has been doing all of his drills alongside starter Chris Iannetta in the early part of Spring Training. Butera is out of options and has the most experience among the candidates, seemingly making him a favorite for the job.
  • Asked if he’d like to keep Albert Pujols at the same range of games at first base as last year (116), Scioscia said: “It’s just going to be based on how he feels. We’re a better team with him at first base, but realistically, we know how important he is hitting in the middle of our lineup.”
  • Angels first-base coach Alfredo Griffin saw 20-year-old Cuban infielder Roberto Baldoquin train in the Dominican Republic before the club gave him an $8 million signing bonus and compared him to Jose Iglesias. “I think he can stick at second and short,” Griffin said.
  • There’s still no update on Josh Hamilton, who’s in the early stages of his recovery from surgery to his right AC joint. “He’s in Houston doing his physical therapy,” Scioscia said. “Same timetable we had. It’s just open-ended right now.”

Alden

Could 2020 be Albert Pujols’ final season? …

Albert Pujols has a 9-year-old daughter, Sophia, who’s really passionate about gymnastics and really good at it. On Saturday, Pujols and his wife, Deidre, saw her win first place at a big meet in St. Louis.

“It brought tears to our eyes,” Pujols said Sunday afternoon, minutes after joining his Angels teammates in Spring Training.

Sophia is gunning for the 2020 Summer Olympics, which will take place in Tokyo. That prompted a reporter to say he could still be in the Major Leagues while his daughter is in the Olympics.

“And that might be the year I have to retire,” Pujols said. “You can put that in the paper, because I don’t want to miss it.”

Sophia, born in November 2005, would only be 14 by the time the 2020 Olympics start, and right now you must be at least 16 to enter. But Pujols said she’s targeting 2020 nonetheless.

“Who knows,” he said. “They’re always changing the rules.”

Pujols’ 10-year, $240 million contract runs through 2021, so if he holds true to that, he’d be leaving his contract with two years left on it, just before his age-40 season. Don’t take this as something written in stone, though. Pujols was being playful, and later joked, “Maybe I’ll just have them put me on the DL for a couple weeks.”

But the superstar first baseman has hinted in the past about the possibility that he doesn’t play out the entire contract, and instead just works something out with the Angels. He wants to go out on his terms, and has too much pride to hold on when he can’t be productive.

Right now, though, he really loves seeing his daughter compete.

Watching her in November was part of the reason he opted out of participating in the Japan Series.

“We were so happy for her,” Pujols said. “It was almost a sign. We want to support her and want to continue for her to have that success.”

Alden

Some Spring Training reading material …

garrett_richards_stills7Pitchers and catchers report for their physicals on Thursday, and with that a new season officially begins. Physicals take place away from the Tempe Diablo Stadium complex, so “report day” isn’t quite as eventful for the Angels as it is for other teams. But some players will trickle in, and Mike Scisocia will speak with the media later in the afternoon, shortly after meeting with his coaching staff.

Before all the madness begins, I thought I’d do my best to help you get caught up. Below is a list of previews, features and blog post from the offseason that you might have missed and are still timely with the start of Spring Training upon us.

You can see an updated 40-man roster here, a depth chart of where those 40 players fit in here, a list of non-roster invitees here, the Top 20 Prospects here and injury updates here. No changes were made to the coaching staff, but Tim Bogar was added to the front office and a variety of changes were made to the Minor League development staffs, with Keith Johnson reassigned and Dave Anderson, Johnny Narron and Pepperdine University product Chad Tracy among those hired.

Spring Training preview series

A look at players on the rebound
Examining the new faces
Prospects to watch
Angels are better for the future, but are they better in the present?
Projecting the lineup, rotation, ‘pen
Three big questions

Around The Horn

Catcher
Middle infield
Corner infield
Outfield
Rotation
Bullpen

Features

Pre-Spring Training Inbox
Story and video on Garrett Richards‘ recovery
On Matt Shoemaker‘s against-all-odds journey to the Rookie of the Year race
Chance to strengthen right leg has Albert Pujols excited
Jered Weaver has bulked up, wants to pitch deeper
Coaches believe Mike Trout can cut down on his strikeouts
Can Josh Hamilton bounce back?
Tyler Skaggs ‘bittersweet’ about start of Spring Training
Depth charts are at the heart of Angels’ strategy
An inside look at the pursuit of Roberto Baldoquin
How Andrew Heaney became the guy the Angels couldn’t pass up
Finally some representation in MLB.com’s Top 100 Prospects

Blogs

The Angels finally have some payroll flexibility
A look at how the Angels would look without Josh
Will Jerry Dipoto dabble in next winter’s premier class of FA starters?
Examining a tougher AL West
Talent on the Triple-A affiliate is on the rise
When will the Angels get their first Hall of Famer?
Video highlights of Trout’s best moments from the 2014 season

Alden

Angels to enter 2015 with financial flexibility …

accountantThe Angels avoided arbitration with Matt Joyce earlier on Monday, and now, barring a surprising, last-minute addition, it looks like their Opening Day payroll is pretty much set.

Let’s take a look at what we’ve got for 2015, with information provided by Cot’s Contracts

Josh Hamilton: $25.4M
Albert Pujols: $24M
C.J. Wilson: $18.5M
Jered Weaver: $18.2M
Erick Aybar: $8.75M
Huston Street: $7M
David Freese: $6.425M
Mike Trout: $6,083,333
Chris Iannetta: $5.525M
Joe Smith: $5.25M
Joyce: $4.75M
Garrett Richards: $3.2M
Hector Santiago: $2.29M
Fernando Salas: $1.37M
Cesar Ramos: $1.312M
Vinnie Pestano: $1.15M
Collin Cowgill: $995,000
Drew Butera: $987,500

That’s $141,187,833 for 18 players (and $86,100,000 for four). When adding the Major League minimum ($500,000) to seven more in order to make a full roster, that gives the Angels a 2015 Opening Day payroll of about $144,687,833 (not exact because a lot of players get slightly more than the minimum). That’s third-highest in club history, but about $10 million less than last year.

Here’s a look at previous Opening Day payrolls dating back to 2000 …

2000: $55,800,000
2001: $47,735,167
2002: $61,721,667
2003: $79,031,667
2004: $100,534,667
2005: $97,725,322
2006: $103,472,000
2007: $109,251,333
2008: $119,216,333
2009: $113,709,000
2010: $121,113,867
2011: $141,755,666
2012: $151,381,000
2013: $137,271,250
2014: $154,546,500

As I’ve explained before, though, the Competitive Balance Tax payroll (the average annual value of all 40-man roster contracts, plus benefits and bonuses) is what typically matters most to the Angels, who want to stay below the luxury-tax threshold of $189 million.

Since signing Pujols and Wilson in December 2011, the Angels have been painstakingly close to that line, a reality that has at times impacted their ability to make necessary, late-season additions.

Heading into this season, they have some flexibility, and a source said they plan to use it if necessary.

As it stands, the Angels’ CBT payroll sits at roughly $174 million (you can’t get the exact figure until the end of the season). That’s a $15 million difference, some of which the Angels can use to upgrade the rotation, or second base, or anything else that may come up in the first half.

July could be a very interesting month this year.

Alden

The Angels and next winter’s free-agent starters …

David PriceBarring a drastic, last-minute change in strategy, the Angels will not pursue James Shields, just like they didn’t pursue Max Scherzer and they didn’t pursue Jon Lester. They bowed out of the free-agent market for starting pitchers this winter — the free-agent market in general, actually — because they already have a top-heavy payroll and they didn’t deem another splurge practical.

What about next winter?

The next free-agent crop of starters is a doozy. David Price, Johnny Cueto, Jordan Zimmermann, Jeff Samardzija, Hisashi Iwakuma, Mat Latos and Doug Fister are all slated to headline one of the deepest groups we’ve ever seen. Will the Angels be a player in that market, with David Freese, Chris Iannetta, Matt Joyce and Huston Street all in line to come off the books? (They’d like to extend Street.)

Maybe — but probably not.

“I wouldn’t say no, and at this point I wouldn’t say yes,” Angels general manager Jerry Dipoto said when asked about going after the top starters in next year’s market. “One of the things we like a lot about the way the team is currently built is the level of depth we have among starting pitchers. While we do have the potential departure of some free agents, we’re looking at a projected payroll number next year that’s similar to the one we’re operating at now.”

It’s true. Despite the potential departures, Mike Trout‘s salary will go from $6.08 million to $16.08 million; Josh Hamilton‘s will go from $25.4 million to $32.4 million; incremental jumps will come for Albert Pujols, C.J. Wilson and Jered Weaver; and natural arbitration hikes will follow.

The Angels’ projected Opening Day payroll is $145 million for 2015, third-highest in team history but $9 million smaller than last year (which means there’s room for in-season upgrades). For 2016, their Competitive Balance Tax payroll (which takes the average annual value of all 40-man-roster contracts, plus benefits and bonuses, and is used by Major League Baseball to determine which teams exceed the $189 million tax threshold) is already almost $120 million for just seven players

More importantly, the Angels will have every current starter back — Weaver, Wilson, Garrett Richards, Matt Shoemaker, Hector Santiago, Nick Tropeano and Andrew Heaney — plus Tyler Skaggs, who should be fully recovered from Tommy John surgery.

But Weaver and Wilson will be heading into the final year before free agency. And look at what the Nationals just did. They didn’t need starting pitching, but they signed Scherzer because he was available now and because Zimmermann and Fister will be free agents at season’s end. Now they can comfortably trade Zimmermann or Fister (or perhaps Stephen Strasburg), or hold onto all of them and have the ultimate rotation, 2011 Phillies style.

Can the Angels do something similar?

I wouldn’t rule it out, but I also wouldn’t count on it.

“While I won’t say we have expectation that most or any of [the Angels’ starters] are going to be the quality of David Price, understanding that we need to continue to grow the foundation, at some point you have to provide those guys with the innings to grow,” Dipoto said. “Next year, we’re looking at the same group of starting pitchers; we won’t lose control of anyone. We like our group and like their upside.”

Alden

The Angels and the Hall of Fame …

Vladimir GuerreroNine Hall of Famers have played for the Angels at some point in their careers — sometimes for pretty long stretches — but none have gone into Cooperstown with an Angels hat. Nolan Ryan pitched in Anaheim for eight years, from 1972-79, but went in with a Rangers cap. Rod Carew spent his last seven seasons with the Angels, from 1979-85, but went in as a member of the Twins. Reggie Jackson spent five of his twilight years here, from 1982-86, but alas, he’s a Yankee.

So basically the Angels have zero representation in the Hall of Fame. Seven other current teams are in the same boat, but that can change soon for the D-backs (Randy Johnson), Mariners (Johnson, Edgar Martinez, Ken Griffey Jr.) and Astros (Craig Biggio, Jeff Bagwell). The others are the Rockies, Marlins, Rays and Nationals, four teams that didn’t exist as recently as 1992.

The Angels have had some very notable representation on the ballot. Darin Erstand, Troy Percival and Tim Salmon have recently received token Hall of Fame votes, but have dropped off the ballot because they didn’t get the required five-percent support. Jim Edmonds, Troy Glaus, Garret Anderson, David Eckstein and Bengie Molina will debut in the next ballot, but four of them probably don’t have a shot and the other (Edmonds) would probably go in as a member of the Cardinals if elected.

I recently wrote about why Bobby Grich may have deserved more love from Hall of Fame voters, and how he could’ve been the first Angels representative in the Hall, but it looks like he’ll never get in.

At some point, though, the Angels will have their Hall of Famer.

Question is: Who?

Maybe it’s Vladimir Guerrero, whom Pedro Martinez vouched for recently, but Guerrero — eligible for the 2017 class — spent his first eight years with the now-defunct Montreal Expos.

Maybe it’s Albert Pujols, who should definitely be a first-ballot Hall of Famer but will have always put up his greatest numbers in St. Louis.

Maybe it’s Mike Scisocia, who’s building a Hall of Fame resume as a manager.

Or maybe it’s Mike Trout, who is on a path to becoming one of the greatest players in baseball history but, you know, is only 23 years old.

Class of 2035?

Vote below on who you think it will be and share your thoughts in the comments section.

Alden

Dipoto: ‘We haven’t discussed C.J. Wilson at all’ …

C.J. Wilson was a late entry into the starting-pitching market, but general manager Jerry Dipoto said the Angels aren’t shopping the veteran left-hander, or have even received calls on him.

“We haven’t discussed C.J. Wilson at all,” Dipoto said from his suite at the Manchester Grand Hyatt in San Diego on Monday, Day 1 of the Winter Meetings.

“We had one club within the week of the end of the World Series ask if we would consider moving C.J. and that was the only discussion. That discussion lasted all of 10 minutes. We moved on; never revisited it.”

Jon Heyman of CBSSports.com reported on Sunday that the Angels are shopping Wilson and industry sources told MLB.com on Monday that a few teams checked in on Wilson, but were only interested if the Angels ate some of the money still owed to him.

Wilson is coming off his worst season as a starting pitcher, is owed $38 million over the last two years of his contract and can block a trade to eight different teams this offseason. Those factors, not to mention what’s still a robust starting-pitching market, make it very difficult to move him.

For the Angels, it would only make sense to move Wilson if it freed up enough payroll space so they can then sign a top-tier free-agent starter. Considering they’re less than $10 million below the luxury-tax threshold, which continues to act as their spending limit, that would probably require a team to take on all of Wilson’s remaining salary.

Nobody’s lining up to do that, and Dipoto stressed he has a lot of confidence in a bounceback year.

“He had a bad second half,” Dipoto said. “Wasn’t a great one. He’ll come back, and he’ll find a way to refocus himself. He wasn’t great in the second half of 2012. In 2013, he couldn’t have been better post to post. He was outstanding.”

Some other notes from today’s session with Dipoto …

  • Dipoto is still looking to find a backup infielder, but the only free agent he’s interested in is Gordon Beckham. Dipoto said Beckham’s interest in a return is “fair,” but he’ll probably want to test the market to see if he can get an everyday job somewhere. If not Beckham, Dipoto would seek a trade, and would likely use his excess of right-handed relief pitching — Kevin Jepsen, Fernando Salas, Vinnie Pestano, etc. — to acquire it.
  • The Angels could have some news on Cuban middle infielder Roberto Baldoquin on Tuesday. They’ve been waiting for the 22-year-old to obtain his visa from the Dominican Republic so he can take his physical and sign the deal.
  • Dipoto would also like to add some depth at backup catcher, and will look to free agency in hopes of acquiring someone on a Minor League deal.
  • As far as Major League free agents? “Right now, we’re not engaged with any free agents, and we haven’t been engaged with any free agents. And right now, as we sit here today, our intention is to avoid that. We have a shorter list of needs. We’re open to any kind of creative suggestions in terms of trades, but we’re not openly shopping players. We’re not engaged with any team on a specific discussion regarding any of our primary players, including those who I’ve heard have been heavy on the Twitter wire.”
  • The Angels are waiting to finalize a Minor League deal with a lefty reliever.
  • This is a normal offseason for Josh Hamilton, who spent last winter trying to regain weight while working with a functional-movement coach. “Nothing special or significant,” Dipoto said. “He’s a pro. He’ll come in, he’ll work, he’ll be ready to play. Josh, I know he left on a sour note, but I have no doubt that Josh went home and he’s getting himself prepared to play baseball. It’s what he does.”
  • Dipoto also made it sound like he isn’t all that interested in trading any of his infielders.
  • Is the DH spot resolved? “Yes. Our game plan going in was to use the DH position to rotate position players through. … The primary bulk of DH at-bats will go to Cron, but this [the acquisition of Marc Krauss] gives us another alternative, someone who can compete for at-bats, gives us another in-season alternative.”

Alden

Mike Trout wins AL MVP Award …

Mike Trout has often been considered the best all-around player in the game, and now the Angels’ center fielder has the trophy to help back that claim.

Trout was named the American League’s Most Valuable Player on Thursday, an honor that became a foregone conclusion after yet another superb season. Trout got all 30 first-place votes by the Baseball Writers’ Association of America, becoming the youngest unanimous MVP in Major League history. His 420 points easily the topped the two fellow finalists, with Tigers designated hitter Victor Martinez getting 229 points and Indians outfielder Michael Brantley amassing 185 points.

“It’s unbelievable, just to think about it,” Trout told MLB Network via satellite from his parents’ house in New Jersey. “If you would’ve told me this before, when the season started, I would’ve just laughed at you. This is an unbelievable feeling. It’s awesome.”

Trout joins Vladimir Guerrero (2004) and Don Baylor (1979) as the only AL MVP Award winners in Angels history and is the 17th player to win it unanimously, with Frank Robinson doing it twice and Albert Pujols – with the Cardinals in 2009 – being the latest.

“So exciting to see another AL MVP wearing the Angels’ uniform,” said Guerrero, who, like Trout, wore No. 27. “I also want to thank Mike for wearing my favorite number.”

“It may be his first MVP,” Baylor added, “but it won’t be his last.”

Trout, who didn’t turn 23 until this past Aug. 7, now has a unanimous MVP Award to join his unanimous AL Rookie of the Year Award selection three years earlier. He is the fifth-youngest MVP in history and the youngest since Cal Ripken Jr. in 1983 — a year in which the former Orioles shortstop didn’t turn 23 until Aug. 24.

Trout led the Majors in Wins Above Replacement (WAR) for the third straight season with a score of 7.8, according to FanGraphs.com. He posted a .287/.377/.561 slash line, hit a career-high 36 homers, led the AL in RBIs (111) and runs scored (115), and paced the Majors in total bases (338) and extra-base hits (84). In the process, he became the first player in baseball history with at least 300 runs, 75 homers and 75 steals in his first 400 games.

“Mike has had an incredible start to his career,” Angels manager Mike Scioscia said in a statement. “His play this year totally embodies what an MVP is all about. His terrific performance, along with his selfless style of play, has made him a tremendous leader on this team.”

Trout is the fourth AL player to finish in the top two of MVP ballots three or more straight years, joining Mickey Mantle (1960-62), Yogi Berra (1953-56) and Hal Newhouser (1944-46). The three-time All-Star and Silver Slugger Award winner is also the sixth player to win All-Star Game MVP and regular-season MVP in the same season.

“The sky is the limit for Mike,” Angels left fielder Josh Hamilton said.

“Mike respects the game and plays it the right way,” Pujols said. “It’s a privilege to have him as a teammate and a friend.”

Trout burst onto the scene with an improbable rookie season in 2012 (.326 average, .963 OPS, 30 homers, 49 steals, 10.1 WAR) and avoided a sophomore slump with a similarly impressive 2013 season (.323 average, .988 OPS, 27 homers, 33 steals, 10.5 WAR). But he lost out to Miguel Cabrera, who posted better power numbers for division-champion Tigers teams (including the Triple Crown in ’12) but produced a lower WAR.

This season, Trout led the AL with 184 strikeouts, stole a relatively low 16 bases, reached base less frequently — a .416 on-base percentage from 2012-13; a .377 on-base percentage in 2014 — and had a minus-9.8 Ultimate Zone Rating in center field. But the power numbers increased, no other players particularly stood out, and the Angels led the Majors with 98 wins during the regular season.

Unlike the last two years, there was no debate this time around.

“Mike Trout has been an all-around force over the past three seasons,” Angels general manager Jerry Dipoto said. “This honor is well deserved and further affirms his position as the premier player in the game.”

Alden

Stories, Twitter handles leading up to the ALDS …

Royals Angels Baseball

The American League Division Series is finally here, and we’ve had a lot of content leading up to it. So, I thought it’d be a good idea to organize it all in one spot, in case you missed anything along the way and would like to give something a read …

Angels

A look at Mike Trout’s likely MVP season and who he’s evolving to as a hitter
On Jered Weaver — his success without velocity and why he may be at his best right now
Odds are against Josh Hamilton in the ALDS, and maybe that’s what finally gets him going
How “Win For GRich” became a rallying cry for the Angels this season
Q&A with Jerry Dipoto, on Mike Scioscia, ALDS chances and keeping the Angels relevant
Good friends Erick Aybar and Albert Pujols, guiding each other through their 30s
Five reasons the Angels won the American League West
Five reasons the Angels can win the World Series
A look at how the Angels were constructed
A look at the Angels’ postseason history
Finally, Mike Trout gets to play in the postseason
The Angels have a plan to counter a questionable rotation
The Angels’ 2014 season, by the numbers

ALDS

A preview for Game 1
Position-by-position breakdown of the ALDS
Royals-Angels Did You Know
Three Keys for the Angels to beat the Royals in the ALDS
Tale Of The Tape for Game 1
Angels face a big challenge taming the Royals’ running game
Will rust affect the Angels in the ALDS?

We have a great crew for the ALDS, and below are their Twitter handles …

Bill Hill (series editor)
Dick Kaegel (Royals beat reporter)
Lyle Spencer (columnist)
Phil Rogers (columnist)
Matthew DeFranks (Angels in Anaheim)
T.R. Sullivan (Royals)
AJ Cassavell (Royals in Anaheim)
Jesse Sanchez (covering both clubs)
Jackson Alexander (Royals in Kansas City)

Alden

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