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Where will Albert Pujols end up? …

Albert Pujols,

Albert Pujols hit home run Nos. 499 and 500 last night, as you know by now. He’s the 26th member of the 500-home run club, the third-youngest player to reach the milestone and the first to hit 499 and 500 in the same game. And he called his shot, too. Pujols’ homers came in a win, and he got the balls back from a couple of classy Angels fans. Perhaps the best part is that it comes as he’s proving to the world that he’s got a lot of game left, with a Major League-leading eight home runs to go along with a .274/.337/.619 slash line.

Pujols is signed for eight more years (including this one), through 2021. Here’s a look at where he’d finish up, if he plays through that contract, given certain home-run averages …

30-homer average: 732
25-homer average: 692
20-homer average: 652
15-homer average: 612

That’s pretty impressive, that Pujols could average a mere 15 homers for the life of his contract and still become only the ninth player ever to reach the 600-homer milestone. To catch Willie Mays‘ 660, he’d have to average 21 homers from 2014-21; to catch Babe Ruth‘s 714, he’d have to average nearly 28 homers; to catch Hank Aaron‘s 755, he’d have to average nearly 33 homers; to catch Barry Bonds‘ 762, he’d have to average nearly 34 homers.

But the most impressive thing about Pujols is that he isn’t defined by the home run.

He’s simply been a great hitter.

Consider: Pujols is only the ninth member of the 500-home run club with a career batting average of at least .300. And only three members have a higher one than Pujols’ current .321 clip — Ted Williams (.344), Babe Ruth (.342) and Jimmie Foxx (.325).

Yes, the general public has soured a bit on 500 homers, with Pujols becoming the 10th new member of the club in the last 15 years. But power numbers have gone down considerably in recent years, thanks in large part to tougher testing for performance-enhancing substances, and the 500-homer club — almost like the 300-win club, but not as drastic — could go a long time without a new member.

Here’s a look at the active home run leaders, beyond Alex Rodriguez (654) and Pujols, with their ages in parenthesis …

Adam Dunn (34): 444
Jason Giambi (43): 438
David Ortiz (38): 435
Paul Konerko (38): 434
Alfonso Soriano (38): 410
Adrian Beltre (35): 376
Carlos Beltran (37): 363
Aramis Ramirez (36): 357
Mark Teixeira (34): 341
Torii Hunter (38): 317

Besides maybe Dunn — and that’s still a big “maybe” — I don’t see anyone on that list who stands a chance at reaching 500. We may have to wait on the likes of Miguel Cabrera (367 at age 31) or Prince Fielder (287 at 29), or perhaps even Mike Trout (67 at 22) or Giancarlo Stanton (123 at 24).

And after Pujols — if he gets there — when’s the next time we’ll see 600?

“When you look at how great he’s been for the last 14 years, and you start averaging out what that meant to hit 500 home runs, it’s just an incredible feat,” Raul Ibanez said of Pujols. “Combine that with the lifetime batting average, the on-base percentage, it’s just extraordinary.”

Alden

Ernesto Frieri and the long ball …

Ernesto FrieriIt’s early — early enough for sample sizes to be very, very deceiving — but Ernesto Frieri‘s home-run rate has more than tripled.

Nats shortstop Ian Desmond led off the ninth inning of a three-run Angels lead on Monday night with a homer to left center — a 462-foot bomb that was the second longest in Nationals Park history — that went for Frieri’s fourth home run allowed in 8 1/3 innings. His home-runs-per-nine-innings rate is now 4.32, after being a relatively high 1.32 from 2012-13 (the Major League average was 0.99 in that span).

But Angels manager Mike Scioscia sees a silver lining.

“I think it’s pretty clear with Ernie that the balls that have been hit out of the park have been mistakes,” Scioscia said. “It’s not like he’s making good pitches and they’re hitting home runs.”

The ball Desmond hit out on Monday was an 0-1 fastball that was supposed to be low and away but ran middle-in. The one Mariners first baseman Justin Smoak hit out on April 2 was an 0-2 fastball that wasn’t quite high enough. The one Corey Hart followed up with immediately thereafter was a 3-2, chest-high fastball — a pitch that was supposed to be low and away. And the one A’s catcher John Jaso crushed to win the game on April 14 was a 1-2 fastball that grooved right down the middle.

“If they’re hitting good pitches, and they’re hitting them out of the park, and it’s where you’re trying to go with pitches,” Scioscia said, “I think you have a lot more work to do than if it’s a matter of you making a few more mistakes than you used to and they haven’t missed them.”

Yes, Frieri (5.40 ERA, 2-for-3 in saves) has missed his location with all four of the homers. But they’ve all come on his go-to fastball, a pitch hitters were supposed to have a harder time squaring up now that he’s added a changeup and slider.

The lineups for the second of a three-game series …

Angels (9-10)

J.B. Shuck, RF
Mike Trout, CF
Albert Pujols, 1B
Raul Ibanez, LF
Howie Kendrick, 2B
Erick Aybar, SS
David Freese, 3B
Chris Iannetta, C
Tyler Skaggs, SP

Nationals (11-9)

Denard Span, CF
Danny Espinosa, 2B
Jayson Werth, RF
Anthony Rendon, 3B
Ian Desmond, SS
Bryce Harper, LF
Tyler Moore, 1B
Sandy Leon, C
Taylor Jordan SP

Alden

Harper, Trout together again …

troutdc

Mike Trout and Bryce Harper will play against one another in a regular-season game today for the first time on Monday, the start of a three-game Interleague series between the Angels and Nationals in Washington, D.C. Before first pitch, Trout took part in a press conference to talk about his link to the Nats’ star outfielder. Here’s what he had to say …

Any family here?

Yeah, actually I do. Baltimore’s closer, but this is the most tickets I’ve ever left today (15).

How do you handle the comparisons, be it with Harper or Miguel Cabrera?

It’s not like we really compete against each other. We’re both trying to get hits, obviously. For me, if I try to do too much, that’s when I get in trouble. I’m just trying to win ballgames.

Appreciate interest fans have for this matchup?

Yeah, it’s good. We have some young talent in the league, [Manny] Machado, Harper, me. I can name a bunch of guys. To be a part about it, and playing on the same day in the same city, it’s pretty cool. It’s good for the fans.

Talking to him near the batting cage?

Yeah. It was the first time I’ve seen him in a while. It was just pretty cool to see him. We were just talking about some stuff; talking baseball.

Is it distracting to play close to home?

Sometimes it gets a little overwhelming because you want to see everybody and talk to everybody. But sometimes it’s tough. You have a lot of things to do, and you have to prepare for the game, obviously. But it’s cool when you’re in the outfield and stuff, or you’re on deck and you see some friends you haven’t seen in a while. I think it’s pretty cool.

Is it strange to also be linked to Cabrera?

I’m just trying to have good years, and it just so happened that at the end of my first two we were 1-2 in MVP. Just being linked with him makes me feel good. He’s a great player, obviously. Just being compared with him and other guys, that makes you feel good.

Do you like being compared to Harper ever since you both entered the league?

I kind of figured it. Ever since we were in the Fall League. … People are always going to get compared. It’s pretty cool being compared, not just Harper but the Hall of Fame guys like [Mickey] Mantle, guys like growing up, you watched them play. Guys that I haven’t seen play because I was born in ’91.

Ever catch yourself peeking at Harper’s stats?

Not really. I’m a guy that looks up friends. … All the guys. After the game, go on the MLB app or whatever and check out some highlights when I have a little downtime in the hotel.

What was your relationship like with Harper during the 2011 Arizona Fall League?

There was a lot of hype, but we were terrible. It’s just one of those things. I’m sure if you gave us that team again the year after that, we would’ve done better. There was just a lot of great players coming in from other organizations and playing on one team. … I made a lot of new friends there. It was cool.

What about Harper’s game impresses you?

He plays the game hard. He’s max-effort every time — besides that lack of hustle the other day. That’s the way they have it over there. If you don’t obey the rules, you’re going to pay the price. … I talked to him about it; he [knows] what he did wrong. We’re both trying to have fun and win ballgames.

Do you and Harper keep in touch during the season?

We’re not texting each other saying, ‘Keep your front side open’ or anything like that. If he does something good — like the other day, I shot him a text just messing around like, ‘A couple of guys in the clubhouse are wondering if you got jammed on that ball you hit down the line, the one that went in the third deck.’ Just small talk. Nothing crazy.

Alden

Some notes from the Angels’ 11-6 win …

Albert Pujols hit his 497th home run, Howie Kendrick went deep twice, five players had multiple extra-base hits and Jered Weaver bounced back with six innings of one-run ball — but John McDonald somehow stole the show, diving to his left and somehow completing a throw while tumbling, then ending the game on a heads-up, unassisted double play.

Here are some other side notes from Friday night’s win, with some numbers courtesy of the Angels’ PR department …

  • Pujols still doesn’t want to get into his chase for 500 homers. A reporter tried to ask him post game, and he cut off the question mid-sentence saying, “I’m not talking about it.”
  •  This was only Kendrick’s 13th career start at designated hitter. He said he hit in the cage twice during the game, but mainly likes to sit in the dugout “because it feels like you’re in the game.”
  • Ian Stewart fell a homer shy of the cycle, and was in the hole when the Angels made their last out on offense. And he wanted that at-bat. “Oh, I wanted it as much as any at-bat I’ve ever had,” Stewart said. “I think I would’ve tried for it, I guess. Just being honest. Depending on the score, of course.”
  • Josh Wall, the reason Ernesto Frieri even pitched the ninth inning, is the first Angel to be charged with five or more earned runs since Donnie Wall (no relation) on April 22, 2002, against the Mariners. He’s only the 13th pitcher (and first Angel) in the last 100 years to do that in his first game with a team.
  • The Angels’ 27 homers are the most through 16 games in team history.

Alden

Freese scratched for series opener in Detroit …

David FreeseAngels third baseman David Freese was scratched from the Angels’ lineup on Friday, hours before the series opener against the Tigers from Comerica Park. Freese is experiencing tightness in his right quad, an injury Angels manager Mike Scioscia doesn’t deem serious.

The 30-year-old enters the Angels’ nine-game, three-city road trip with the third-lowest OPS among qualifiers (.414) and has struck out 15 times in 13 games.

“We’re going to monitor it and see if he’ll be available today, maybe, to do something, but right now we don’t want to start him,” Scioscia said. “It doesn’t look serious right now.”

Earlier today, the Angels optioned left-hander (and former Tiger) Jose Alvarez to Triple-A Salt Lake and brought up power right-hander Josh Wall. Scioscia said the Angels “want Jose Alvarez to go down there and get stretched out, because he is in our depth chart as a starter, and Josh is throwing the ball well. It’s a nice power right-handed arm and we’ll see where he fits in.”

Here are the lineups …

Angels (7-8)

Collin Cowgill, RF
Mike Trout, CF
Albert Pujols, 1B
Howie Kendrick, DH
Chris Iannetta, C
Erick Aybar, SS
J.B. Shuck, LF
John McDonald, 2B
Ian Stewart, 3B

SP: RH Jered Weaver (0-2, 5.79 ERA)

Tigers (7-5)

Ian Kinsler, 2B
Torii Hunter, RF
Miguel Cabrera, 1B
Victor Martinez, DH
Austin Jackson, CF
Don Kelly, 3B
Alex Avila, C
Andrew Romine, SS
Rajai Davis, LF

LH: Drew Smyly (1-0, 0.00 ERA)

Alden

Angels lose Calhoun to an ankle injury …

Angels right fielder and leadoff man Kole Calhoun twisted his right ankle after crossing first base on an 11th-inning groundout on Tuesday night and is headed to the 15-day disabled list, where he’ll join cleanup-hitting left fielder Josh Hamilton.

Leading off the bottom of the 11th of an eventual 10-9 loss to the A’s, Calhoun hit a grounder to second base and crossed first base just fine. But he caught his right foot on a soft spot just beyond the bag and had to be helped off the field.

“I just rolled it and it hurt real bad,” said Calhoun, who was on crutches postgame. “It’s just a freak thing, you know?”

Calhoun went 3-for-6 with a two-run homer and a key ninth-inning double as the Angels suffered back-to-back losses to their division rivals, and was 7-for-15 in his last three games.

In Triple-A Salt Lake, the Angels have left-handed-hitting outfielders Matt Long (.270 batting average so far this season) and Brennan Boesch (.250) they can call up. Each would have to be added to the 40-man roster, which is currently full. The Angels could also try to acquire versatile outfielder Sam Fuld, who was designated for assignment by the A’s on Saturday.

Asked about Angels manager Mike Scioscia saying he’ll be going on the DL, Calhoun said: ““It’s disappointing. Nothing’s solidified right now, but we’ll see what happens.”

Alden

Baylor could be back with team by April 28 …

Don BaylorAngels hitting coach Don Baylor is currently in physical therapy and manager Mike Scioscia is hopeful that he can rejoin the team when it returns from a three-city road trip, for the April 28 series opener against the Indians.

It’ll still be a while before Baylor can be in the dugout during games, and even longer before he can travel with the team. But Baylor, who suffered a fractured right femur while catching the ceremonial first pitch thrown by Vladimir Guerrero on Opening Day, can at least work with hitters and attend pregame hitters before home games in about 13 days.

“Don’s a tough guy,” Scioscia said. “He’s anxious to get back. We’ve texted a lot. He’s in touch with [hitting coaches] Dave [Hansen] and Paul [Sorrento] on a daily basis. He’s still keeping tabs on everything that’s going on.”

Baylor was discharged from UCI Medical Center on April 4, three days post-op. Based on his initial prognosis, the 64-year-old is still at least three weeks away from being able to put weight on his right side, so he’d probably be getting around on a walker upon returning to Angel Stadium.

Scioscia said he doesn’t “anticipate Don back in full force for a while.”

“Even being here and being in the dugout, getting involved; I’m not sure when that’s going to be.”

Some other pregame notes from Jackie Robinson Day …

  • Scioscia did not back off from his statements (and Howie Kendrick‘s) from Monday night regarding the bang-bang play at first base in the ninth inning: “We said it last night and we looked at it again yesterday. I don’t know what angle they were looking at, but the way it’s explained to us is the ball has to hit the back of a fielder’s mitt before you stop the play to see where the runner’s foot is. And Howie’s foot is clearly on the bag before that ball hits the back of [Daric] Barton’s mitt.
  • Asked if he believes David Freese, dropped to seventh after striking out twice in each of his last two games, is putting added pressure on himself, Scioscia said: “We’ve had those conversations with David and we monitored them very quickly. He’s very calm on the baseball field and I think he understands that he can play better than he did last year. Coming to a new team, there might be an element of that. But I think he’s very comfortable with the teammates, he’s very comfortable with what his role was on the club, and hopefully he’ll start to hit stride and get the big hits that he’s capable of getting.”
  • It appears, though it’s unofficial yet, that Dane De La Rosa was reaclled from Triple-A Salt Lake so that he could be placed on the 15-day disabled list. Scioscia said the injury “is not significant” and that De La Rosa will continue in his throwing program. … Sean Burnett is playing catch again today and is expected to go to Arizona to throw off a mound in a few days. … And yes, Ernesto Frieri is still the closer.

Athletics (9-4)

John Jaso, C
Jed Lowrie, SS
Josh Donaldson, 3B
Brandon Moss, 1B
Yoenis Cespedes, LF
Alberto Callaspo, DH
Josh Reddick, RF
Craig Gentry, CF
Eric Sogard, 2B

SP: RH Dan Straily (1-1, 2.77 ERA)

Angels (6-7)

Kole Calhoun, RF
Mike Trout, CF
Albert Pujols, 1B
Raul Ibanez, DH
Howie Kendrick, 2B
J.B. Shuck, LF
David Freese, 3B
Chris Iannetta, C
Erick Aybar, SS

SP: RH Garrett Richards (2-0, 0.75 ERA)

Alden

An encouraging outing for Hector Santiago …

Hector SantiagoHector Santiago‘s Angels career started off 0-2, with eight earned runs in 9 1/3 innings through two starts against the Mariners.

He needed a change.

So he took the mound against the A’s on Monday with his socks up high for the first time.

“You gotta change it up sometimes,” Santiago said, trying to crack a smile despite a crushing 3-2 loss. “Actually, it was kind of scary, because the last two times I did that with the White Sox it didn’t go so well.”

The more tangible difference was that Santiago had much better command in the opener of a three-game series, while pitching seven innings of one-run ball in what ended up being a no-decision because of John Jaso‘s two-run, ninth-inning homer off Ernesto Frieri. Against an A’s team that came in ranked third in the American League in walks, Santiago — with his career walk rate at 4.6 — didn’t issue a free pass until the seventh inning and didn’t allow much hard contact besides Yoenis Cespedes‘ fourth-inning solo homer.

Santiago felt “more in control of myself,” and that was particularly obvious while working out of jams in the sixth and seventh.

The Angels’ defense extended Santiago’s inning in the sixth, when Erick Aybar had a tough time reading Craig Gentry’s liner off the bat and Albert Pujols threw high of second on an ensuing pickoff. But Santiago got Jed Lowrie to line out and struck out Josh Donaldson for his third punchout. The A’s put runners on first and second with one out in the seventh, but Santiago induced a flyout of Nick Punto and came back from down 3-0 to get Josh Reddick to pop out behind the plate.

This was the kind of outing the 26-year-old left-hander badly needed.

“Definitely; there’s no doubt,” Santiago said after lowering his ERA from 7.71 to 4.96. “Coming into today I was like, ‘I need some positive [momentum] moving forward. [First start of the season], I was antsy, man. I had a lot of adrenaline going. First game as an Angel. Last game I think I was just like, ‘OK, forget about it and let’s attack. Let’s go at ‘em, let’s go as hard as I can as long as I can.’ Today I was like, ‘Let’s attack, but let’s be under control.’ I took a little bit from each of those first two games and made it work in this game.”

And for next game, the high socks will return.

“Oh, there’s no doubt,” Santiago said. “I’m going to stick with it until it tells me not to. … I love the look, you know. I love the look for sure. And sometimes you just have to mix it up.”

Alden

Hamilton can start swinging again by Friday …

joshAngels outfielder Josh Hamilton was back at the ballpark for the first time on Monday, three days after undergoing surgery on his left thumb that’s expected to keep him out 6-8 weeks.

Hamilton will have his stitches removed on Friday, while also getting the hard cast around his left thumb replaced with a removable splint. He can’t do any rehab with his finger until May 2, but he can start running, lifting, swinging off a tee with his bottom hand — the most important hand for a hitter — and “doing all the things I need to do to keep in shape” when he gets the stitches removed on Friday.

Hamilton, who got back to about 240 pounds over the offseason, isn’t concerned about losing muscle during his rehab, saying: “It’s only a week, and then I’ll get my stitches out and I’ll be able to start doing leg workouts and body workouts. You can do a lot of stuff without gripping a barbell, so I don’t see that being a problem.”

He won’t travel with the team in its upcoming three-city trip through Detroit, Washington and New York, and the Angels are planning to have Hamilton go to Arizona to do some baseball activities while they’re in Toronto from May 9-11.

“I’m not going to put a time frame on it,” Hamilton said of his recovery. “I’m just going to do what I need to do as far as listening to the doctor as far as keeping it stable for the first two or three weeks, and then after that, once they tell me it’s healed, I’ll start doing rehab and being aggressive with it.”

Hamilton suffered a complete tear of the ulnar collateral ligament and also a torn capsule when he banged his left thumb into first base during a headfirst slide in the seventh inning at Safeco Field on Wednesday. It was a major loss for an Angels lineup that could be without its cleanup hitter and main power supply from the left slide until June. And it’s a major blow to Hamilton, who was named co-American League Player of the Week to start the season and was batting .444/.545/.741 through his first 33 plate appearances.

“I felt like my old self – my 2010, ’11, ’12 self,” Hamilton said in a press conference prior to the series opener against the A’s from Angel Stadium. “That’s why it’s my bummer, but there’s no reason why I can’t come back and still feel like that.”

Hamilton said he “reassessed” his headfirst slide as soon as he saw the replay, and in hindsight understands shouldn’t have done it. Asked if he’ll avoid sliding headfirst into first base moving forward, Hamilton, who has done it several times throughout his career, said: “I ain’t gonna make any promises.”

“What I’ve learned is no matter what you do, if something goes bad, you’re going to catch criticism,” Hamilton said. “When it goes good, no big deal. It just helps you guys write about a bunch of other stuff, so, you’re welcome.”

Some pregame notes …

  • Sean Burnett is with the team at home and was planning to play catch on Monday, after being shut down after his simulated game in Arizona on April 5. Burnett said he had some swelling around his left elbow that has since subsided. Nobody really knew the cause of it, but the lefty reliever plans to get off a mound again in a couple of days and doesn’t believe he’ll have to undergo surgery again.
  • David Freese (.458 OPS) started the season batting ahead of Howie Kendrick (.621), but over Freese’s last two starts — he sat on Sunday — Angels manager Mike Scioscia has flipped his two right-handed hitters. Asked what’s wrong with Freese, Scioscia said: “I think he’s trying to get comfortable in the box. There are some things I think he wants to get comfortable with in his stance to find some things and let him get to pitches easier. He’s working hard with Dave Hansen and Paul Sorrento on that. I think he just needs at-bats right now. But this guy’s going to hit. David’s going to hit.”
  • Kole Calhoun batted ninth on Saturday and fifth on Sunday, but he was right back in the leadoff spot against a right-hander on Monday, after his first multi-hit game of the season. My sense is Scioscia will hit Calhoun there against righties and Collin Cowgill at leadoff against lefties, at least for now.
  • On Dane De La Rosa, back in Triple-A after his velocity was surprisingly low in his 2014 debut on Saturday, Scioscia said he’s “getting evaluated on some medical things and having some tests.” “He feels good, he says he feels healthy, so I think you just want to explore why some of his velo is down,” Scioscia added. “Once he’s ready, I know he’s going to get right back on the horse. And Dane De La Rosa is going to be a big part of our bullpen. It’s just going to take a little more time.”

Athletics (8-4)

Craig Gentry, CF
Jed Lowrie, SS
Josh Donaldson, 3B
Yoenis Cespedes, LF
Derek Norris, C
Alberto Callaspo, DH
Nick Punto, 2B
Josh Reddick, RF
Daric Barton, 1B

SP: RHP Jesse Chavez (0-0, 1.38 ERA)

Angels (6-6)

Calhoun, RF
Mike Trout, CF
Albert Pujols, 1B
Raul Ibanez, DH
Kendrick, 2B
Freese, 3B
J.B. Shuck, LF
Hank Conger, C
Erick Aybar, SS

SP: LHP Hector Santiago (0-2, 7.71 ERA)

Alden

Hamilton (left thumb) likely to be out 6-8 weeks

Angels outfielder Josh Hamilton, one of the hottest hitters in baseball, is expected to have surgery on his left thumb that could put him on the shelf until June.

An MRI on Hamilton’s left thumb, which he injured while sliding headfirst into first base in the seventh inning at Safeco Field on Tuesday, revealed that he suffered a complete tear of the ulnar collateral ligament along with a torn capsule.

Hamilton has already been told by the Angels’ medical staff that he will likely undergo surgery, which carries an estimated recovery time of 6-8 weeks, but it won’t be official until he meets with Dr. Steven Shin on Friday.

With Hamilton headed for the disabled list, outfielder J.B. Shuck has been recalled from Triple-A Salt Lake.

“The news sucks,” Hamilton said prior to Wednesday’s game against the Mariners. “Any time you play and you’re playing hard and you’re having fun, the last thing you want to do is do something that’s going to cost you to miss time and maybe hurts your team in the long run. If I could see a future, obviously I wouldn’t do it. But in the moment, when my mind and my body tells me to do something and react some way, I’ve always done it. That’s what I do. I can’t change that.”

Hamilton – delayed earlier in Spring Training with a strained left calf – was finally starting to display the tools that made him a five-time All-Star in Texas, entering Tuesday’s game with a .500 batting average, a couple of homers and a team-leading six walks.

But he banged his left thumb up against the first-base bag while trying to beat out a slow roller to shortstop, had a hard time throwing in the outfield, didn’t feel good while taking dry swings in the batting cage and asked Angels manager Mike Scioscia to pinch-hit for him with two on and none out in the ninth inning of an eventual 5-3 loss.

This is the first time he’s injured his thumb.

“When I got in the dugout, it didn’t feel like anything different than I’ve had before in terms of a jammed finger. When I went out to the outfield and gripped the ball and threw the first three 30 feet to the left of where I was aiming, that was an indication something might be wrong.”

Hamilton is confident he can pick up where he left off because the thumb injury allows him to continue to work out and even swing the bat one-handed. Injuring the left thumb, as opposed to the right thumb, is more ideal for a left-handed hitter, Hamilton noted.

“I don’t plan on being as far behind as people think I’ll be,” Hamilton said. “Everyone thought I’d be far behind in Spring Training without as many at-bats. It’ll be good.”

With Hamilton gone, I expect Collin Cowgill (RHH) and Shuck (LHH) to platoon at left field and leadoff, with Kole Calhoun sliding down in the order to give the middle of the lineup more pop. But I’ll know more when Scioscia talks pregame. Here are today’s lineups …

Angels (3-5)

Cowgill, LF
Mike Trout, CF
Albert Pujols, DH
David Freese, 3B
Howie Kendrick, 2B
Calhoun, RF
Chris Iannetta, C
Ian Stewart, 1B
Erick Aybar, SS

SP: RH Garrett Richards (1-0, 1.80 ERA)

Mariners (5-2)

Abraham Almonte, CF
Brad Miller, SS
Robinson Cano, 2B
Justin Smoak, 1B
Corey Hart, DH
Kyle Seager, 3B
Logan Morrison, RF
Dustin Ackley, LF
Mike Zunino, C

SP: LH Roenis Elias (0-0, 1.80 ERA)

Alden

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