Angels to enter 2015 with financial flexibility …

accountantThe Angels avoided arbitration with Matt Joyce earlier on Monday, and now, barring a surprising, last-minute addition, it looks like their Opening Day payroll is pretty much set.

Let’s take a look at what we’ve got for 2015, with information provided by Cot’s Contracts

Josh Hamilton: $25.4M
Albert Pujols: $24M
C.J. Wilson: $18.5M
Jered Weaver: $18.2M
Erick Aybar: $8.75M
Huston Street: $7M
David Freese: $6.425M
Mike Trout: $6,083,333
Chris Iannetta: $5.525M
Joe Smith: $5.25M
Joyce: $4.75M
Garrett Richards: $3.2M
Hector Santiago: $2.29M
Fernando Salas: $1.37M
Cesar Ramos: $1.312M
Vinnie Pestano: $1.15M
Collin Cowgill: $995,000
Drew Butera: $987,500

That’s $141,187,833 for 18 players (and $86,100,000 for four). When adding the Major League minimum ($500,000) to seven more in order to make a full roster, that gives the Angels a 2015 Opening Day payroll of about $144,687,833 (not exact because a lot of players get slightly more than the minimum). That’s third-highest in club history, but about $10 million less than last year.

Here’s a look at previous Opening Day payrolls dating back to 2000 …

2000: $55,800,000
2001: $47,735,167
2002: $61,721,667
2003: $79,031,667
2004: $100,534,667
2005: $97,725,322
2006: $103,472,000
2007: $109,251,333
2008: $119,216,333
2009: $113,709,000
2010: $121,113,867
2011: $141,755,666
2012: $151,381,000
2013: $137,271,250
2014: $154,546,500

As I’ve explained before, though, the Competitive Balance Tax payroll (the average annual value of all 40-man roster contracts, plus benefits and bonuses) is what typically matters most to the Angels, who want to stay below the luxury-tax threshold of $189 million.

Since signing Pujols and Wilson in December 2011, the Angels have been painstakingly close to that line, a reality that has at times impacted their ability to make necessary, late-season additions.

Heading into this season, they have some flexibility, and a source said they plan to use it if necessary.

As it stands, the Angels’ CBT payroll sits at roughly $174 million (you can’t get the exact figure until the end of the season). That’s a $15 million difference, some of which the Angels can use to upgrade the rotation, or second base, or anything else that may come up in the first half.

July could be a very interesting month this year.

Alden

13 Comments

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Pray Hamilton gets hot and trade him. Eat money and call it a day. Same goes for CJ Wilson. They have good young pitching and Weave will stick around. They just need to make smarter cost cutting moves. Halos needed power and overpaid. CJ Cron could help some clubs. Hopefully the halos can make some smart moves and tweak the roster. The bullpen and bench got thinner.

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why isn’t Kole Calhoun on the list???

Because he isn’t arbitration eligible yet and will therefore make the Major League minimum.

improve rotation or get swept in playoffs….

The rotation is improved. They lost two playoff games in extra innings and without Richards. Shoemaker gets 12 more starts. Wilson will bounce back. Weaver is Weaver. And Tropeano and Heaney give the Angels an upgrade in the 5th slot and depth if a pitcher gets hurt. The revamped bullpen will be together for the whole season. Last year they blew 12 leads in the first half– won’t happen this year.

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How much money will there be able to spend next year incase they want to sign a pitcher or other players and give extensions.

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